Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 37
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,957

    Tire changing/Wheel removal

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    A year ago I practiced changing a tire on my Trek - that was quite an ordeal. So much of an ordeal that it has taken me until today to practice the same thing on my LHT - a far easier experience

    The problem was that I wanted to practice on my rear tire, but I couldn't get the wheel off the bike

    I released the rear brake, the quick release, and the black "nut". Before I did any of this I shifted the rear cassette down to the smallest gear and made certain the chain was on the middle ring - and no matter how much I played with the quick release I could NOT get the wheel off the bike!!! I DID move the rear derailleur out of the way while trying to remove the wheel. I wound up practicing on the front tire.

    Any ideas on what might have been the problem? The wheel didn't even feel loose, and I almost unscrewed the black thing in the quick release off! And now I can't get my rear brakes to line up which leads me to believe that the wheel did shift and isn't in straight any more - though it looks fine. I am going to set it aside for tonight and revisit this tomorrow...
    Last edited by Catrin; 03-04-2011 at 06:55 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Did you let the air out of the tire? A lot of rear triangles don't have enough clearance to get the wheel out when the tire is pressurized.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,957
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    Did you let the air out of the tire? A lot of rear triangles don't have enough clearance to get the wheel out when the tire is pressurized.
    Really? I didn't know this & didn't think about it, thanks. I just wanted some practice on taking the rear wheel on and off. I've seen it done often enough, but didn't want my first time to be on the side of the road with a flat...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Between the Blue Ridge and the Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    5,226
    Sometimes you have to sharply strike the wheel to get it to come out of the dropouts. Putting the wheel back on will take some paying attention to aligning it so that it is centered. Keep at it. You'll get there. And GOOD FOR YOU for learning how to do change flats!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,957
    Quote Originally Posted by tulip View Post
    Sometimes you have to sharply strike the wheel to get it to come out of the dropouts. Putting the wheel back on will take some paying attention to aligning it so that it is centered. Keep at it. You'll get there. And GOOD FOR YOU for learning how to do change flats!
    I will work more with this tonight or tomorrow. The guys at my LBS today explained that this isn't an uncommon problem for the rear wheel - and my fitter told me that most flat tires are on the rear

    I have yet to have a flat tire, but given my general preferred style of riding when it happens I will be 30 miles from my apartment or car, no cell phone reception or no one that I can call, and it will be raining. I figure that I need to practice NOW

    I am very pleased at how easy a process it actually was to change my tube last night - the tires on my LHT are much easier to work with than the tires that were on my Trek, for sure. Now I just need to practice getting that rear wheel on and off - though I suspect that will be easier on the custom bike as it will be much lighter.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,617
    I always tell my customers to practice at home instead of learning this, like you say, 30 miles from home, in the rain.

    I find it much easier to remove the rear tire if I have the bike upside down. It's a bad habit that I always do it this way, but it's easier than laying the bike down with the crank on the ground. Less balancing and I can use one hand on the rear derailleur and the other to lift the wheel out.
    For 3 days, I get to part of a thousand other journeys.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,957
    Quote Originally Posted by Pedal Wench View Post
    I always tell my customers to practice at home instead of learning this, like you say, 30 miles from home, in the rain.

    I find it much easier to remove the rear tire if I have the bike upside down. It's a bad habit that I always do it this way, but it's easier than laying the bike down with the crank on the ground. Less balancing and I can use one hand on the rear derailleur and the other to lift the wheel out.
    I had it upside down, and did as you suggest here - one hand on RD and other trying to lift the wheel out but it wouldn't budge. I also think there might be some grit in the rear brake from my ride last weekend so I do need to get that wheel off so I can investigate better.

    Would it help to put my foot on the saddle or can I harm the rails that way? Selle Italia saddle if it matters - I do not know what the rails are made of.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,083
    Hmmm. as long as you don't stomp on the saddle, I'm pretty sure the rails will take your weight just fine. But I'm surprised you're needing that much force. Unless there's corrosion or rust or something in between a short yank should loosen most wheels (well, most wheels you just lift out, it's just the chain and derailleur gizmos that add sideways drag). I know you said you've loosened the QR, but it sounds to me like it's keeping the wheel snug. Just check once more, that you're absolutely sure it's open and loose, the same way as on the front wheel. Loosen/open the brakes (you'll see the brake pads moving away from the rim to give it clearance). Let air out of the tire and squeeze the tire with your fingers (you should see that the rim and tire will then easily be able to pass the brake pads).

    Have the chain on the smallest cog, and try pulling the derailleur back and forth with your hand (a bit greasy), see if you can actually pull the chain off the cog. The drag from the chain wrapped around the cog should be the only thing keeping the wheel a little "stuck". Give the wheel a little wiggle back and forth while you're doing this, and you should feel that it just sits loosely in the dropouts and can be lifted out once you maneuver the chain off the last cog.

    The problem with removing rear wheels is sort of that are a lot of small sticking points that need a little wiggling almost at the same time, but there shouldn't be any real force involved.

    Pardon the sermon
    Last edited by lph; 03-05-2011 at 01:21 PM.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,957
    I have fenders on my bike, I had thought about trying to do this without turning the bike upside down so I could hit the wheel to help it come out as my LBS suggested...but forgot about the fender...

    Once the beer gets out of my system I am going to try it later this evening. Not that I had too much beer or anything

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    9,351
    What seems to be the place it's getting hung up? The brakes or the hub?

    Veronica
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,957
    Quote Originally Posted by Veronica View Post
    What seems to be the place it's getting hung up? The brakes or the hub?

    Veronica
    The hub, LBS told me this isn't unusual and it can be difficult to remove... They suggested hitting the wheel, but of course the fender makes that rather difficult. I also had to really work with the rear brake tension to be able to loosen the rear brake (caliper).

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,957
    Woot! I DID it I got the rear wheel off, took it out completely and put it back in

    I know this is a very small thing, but it feels pretty good to me considering I couldn't do it yesterday. I just want to be comfortable enough with all of this in case I should have to do it someday on the side of a country road.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Between the Blue Ridge and the Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    5,226
    Excellent! Now do it 10 more times.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Personally I really don't advocate turning the bike upside down. Even nowadays when modern cable routing means the housings won't get bent or broken, it's still a lot of hassle, scuffage and extra dirt - and strength, too, if it's a heavier bike - for no real advantage.

    Gravity is a big help when you're getting the wheel back in and aligned. You may as well learn to work with it when you're getting the wheel out, too. You don't have to have the rear wheel off the ground for it to come out of the dropouts or the rear triangle. And if you find you need to give it a little nudge while you pull the stays apart, as you did today, you can use your foot.

    Anyway, great job getting it done. As Tulip said, each time you do it you can refine your technique.
    Last edited by OakLeaf; 03-05-2011 at 05:48 PM.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    1,365
    I was taught to do it once by a Trek representative making the rounds at the bike shop. She released the rear brake, loosened the quick release, put one arm over the frame and gripped the frame, the right hand on the tire, and lifted the bike up and pressed down with the right hand. Comes out no problem every time.
    I can do five more miles.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •