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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    The Red Stick
    Posts
    1,439

    FishJr school issue resolved

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    Well - the 4K vs 5K issue resolved itself. Imagine that. It turns out the schools don't like to bump 4 year olds up into kindergarten, so there was no issue to be had.

    This was a bit of a blessing in disguise. We found a fantastic place for both of the fishlets. It's a learning center. We visited for an hour or so and were quite impressed! The 4yr olds are able to read by the end of the school year and are currently learning vowel sounds, continents, math, science, french, etc. FishJr's current class is learning the letter B this week. Gee - see the difference? They consider this major prep for Kindergarten.

    The 2 year olds are learning to count to 10, french, shapes, colors, weather, etc. These little guys also get lots of playtime. It looked like a great environment. Very cool place!

    So - problem solved.
    *******************
    Elizabee (age 5) at the doctor's office: "I can smell sickness in here...I smell the germs"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Sillycon Valley, California
    Posts
    4,869
    Fantastic fish! I love that they are being taught French!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    3,473
    Boy, does that sound cool. When I was little my mom was in school at SUNY Buffalo. We went to the campus school and took French starting in 1st grade. You learn the music of "la langue" early and it really helps. Shoot, I'D like to go to FishJr's new school.
    "My predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved;I have been given much and I have given something in return...Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and an adventure." O. Sacks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    The Red Stick
    Posts
    1,439
    In some of the public schools in south louisiana they even teach french by immersion for part of the day. The majority of the french that I remember is from what I learned in elementary school. Scary, isn't it?
    *******************
    Elizabee (age 5) at the doctor's office: "I can smell sickness in here...I smell the germs"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    1,485
    I'm so glad it worked out for you! We had a lot of indecision with where to put our 4 year old, but now are very happy with the pre-K program she's in. It sounds quite similar to the program FishJr. is in.

    Good news! I hope everyone has a great year!
    fides quaerens intellectum (faith seeking understanding) - St. Anselm of Canterbury

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,824
    I am very happy everything worked out so well. It sounds as though FishJr will be quuite happy with her new school.
    Jennifer

    “Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.”
    -Mahatma Gandhi

    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act but a habit."
    -Aristotle

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    1,047
    Nice to hear that the fingerling found a good school!

  8. #8
    Kitsune06 Guest
    This is probably a cultural thing, so pardon my ignorance...
    I see French being taught a lot, but in a growing number of places now, one is required (or practically required) to know Spanish relatively well.
    I assume as both being Romance (is that right?) languages, they shouldn't be too far apart, but where is the practical value of French except in Quebec and parts of Louisiana?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    9,351
    Yep, they are both romance languages. Since fish is in LA, I expect that's why it's French being taught. I hope you'll be able to stay there long enough that she can become quite fluent. I so wish I could speak two languages.

    I actually encourage all my students who are bilingual to learn to read and write in their native language. One of my students this year speaks Polish and goes to Polish school on Saturdays. I told him I was envious.

    I'm glad you found such a great solution.

    V.
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Kelowna, BC, Canada
    Posts
    2,737
    Glad it all worked out Fish - the Learning Center sounds wonderful!

    Both of my girls went through school in French Immersion. They were english speaking only at home but started K in 100% French. Didn't start learning to read and write in English until Grade 3. They both LOVED it and were really mad that I didn't put my son in FI as well. Of course, up here it's one of the official languages so it can be useful....

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    The middle of North America
    Posts
    776
    Hooray! Life is so much easier when you find a good educational fit!


    Quote Originally Posted by Kitsune06
    I see French being taught a lot, but in a growing number of places now, one is required (or practically required) to know Spanish relatively well.
    I assume as both being Romance (is that right?) languages, they shouldn't be too far apart, but where is the practical value of French except in Quebec and parts of Louisiana?

    Our school teaches French, Spanish, German and Latin

    Learning any language no matter what it is helps brain development and appreciation and acceptance of cultures different from our own.
    A vast majority of our English words are based on French due to early English nobility only speaking French when in court.

    We often get students whose parents have been stationed in Okinawa, Japan and it is really cool to see how the kids pick up the language and culture

    If I had another chance to guide my child into a language class I would encourage Arabic, Japanese, or Chinese!


    It's about the journey and being in the moment, not about the destination

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Israel (Middle East)
    Posts
    1,200
    DS#1 (now 19) speaks, reads and writes Hebrew, English and Arabic. DS#2 looks like he is going the same way. DD is only fluent in the first two but at first-language level.
    It is intellectual developement certainly, but it is also a social thing in that you have different ways of interpreting The World.
    Makes for a wonderful sense of humour too!

    All you need is love...la-dee-da-dee-da...all you need is love!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    860
    Quote Originally Posted by Kitsune06
    This is probably a cultural thing, so pardon my ignorance...
    I see French being taught a lot, but in a growing number of places now, one is required (or practically required) to know Spanish relatively well.
    I assume as both being Romance (is that right?) languages, they shouldn't be too far apart, but where is the practical value of French except in Quebec and parts of Louisiana?

    Hey Kitsune,

    Valid question. I think some of it is a hold over of when French was a dominent international language. It was one of THE languages to know if one wanted to communicate in the international arena (see Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, etc.) It also had much to do with how many people in the world spoke it due to colonization.

    Though Spanish is dominent here in California, not sure how dominent it is elsewhere in the country. So yes, it's practical for domestic communication.

    However, I think as the EU grows French may become an international language again since the EU Parliment meets in Belgium. I think French is still spoken in many parts of world due to the left overs of colonization.

    Chinese and Japanese are also becoming popular here in NOrthern California due to our proximity to the Pacific Rim, the # of people from these cultures who have immigrated here from those countries and also due to how much business we conduct with Pacific Rim countries.

    People more versed in international relations can speak to this better as opposed to a hack like me.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    127
    French and English are actually the two official languages of NATO also.

    I think it's great to teach really young children a second language - it's so much easier for them to learn - I have known quite a few Americans who send their children to local schools both here and in Germany and their children become fluent quite quickly. I wish it were that easy for me!!

  15. #15
    Kitsune06 Guest
    I'm just saying that in regions like Cali, Oregon, the entire SW, Florida and big chunks of the midwest, I've always seen good reason to teach Spanish as a 2nd language, with others optional, just because *so* many people speak it, and there are definite cultural and communication barriers. Where I work, not one of our officers (our Supervisor, yes, but he's rarely about) speaks Spanish, some barely know enough to relate basic needs/locations with our all-hispanic, barely-english-speaking janitorial staff/many of our employees. That leads to some pretty scary communication breakdowns. I can pick out words here and there, and have expanded my vocabulary a good bit from the time I was hired, but even then...

 

 

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