Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 17

Thread: Messenger bags?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Boulder
    Posts
    930

    Messenger bags?

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    I've started riding in once or twice a week, hopefully I can up that if my work schedule allows. I used to store my clothes the night before in a locker at the gym at work. But I don't have a locker at my new job's gym, and unfortunately can't get one as there is a waiting list. I should be able to keep clothes in my desk, but honestly? I never remember to bring them in the day before, and plus sometimes I just wake up and am like, "I want to commute today!" so I have to wing it. Also, I like to pick my outfit based on how I am feeling that morning.

    So.

    I use a ratty old backpack. I'm already noting issues, particularly in this heat with a sweaty back (luckily not sweaty enough to go through and soak my work clothes). I saw a guy today that had one of those messenger bags. He was on a road bike (I ride my road bike to commute too) and all stretched out and he had this lovely little bag hanging out in the general vicinity of his butt. It looked compact and stable and I wished I had one so my back wouldn't be sweaty.

    Does anyone have any good (preferably inexpensive) recommendations here? Also, I've always wondered, how do you get the shoulder bag things to keep from sliding around to your side and getting you off balance? I don't understand how they always seem to perch there so happily on people's butts without sliding around like they probably would on me...

    K.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Between the Blue Ridge and the Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    5,226
    Personally, I prefer panniers because I don't like anything on my back. I do have a Timbuktu laptop messenger bag, however, that is actually pretty good--very stable and comfortable, if still hot on my back. I got it on sale for $35, usually they are about $70.

    Whatever bag you get, make sure it has a waist strap. That not only prevents the bag from sliding to the sides, but also places the weight on your hips and lower back, and not on your shoulders.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,135
    I coudl never figure out how to make bags keep from sliding all over the place, which could make me crash, so I use my camelbak with the big pockets and my handlebar bag when I'm on my Trek. (On the Xtracycle I just throw everything in the bags on the bike.)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    747
    I'm pretty happy with my Timbuk2 bags although it took me a while to find which size was best for my needs. I agree about the waist strap, it's essential. I also wear my bag with the strap really short when I ride, so that it doesn't rest on my butt so much as my lower back -- otherwise I find that it catches on the saddle if I have to dismount. (I usually commute on a Brooks saddle, and I don't seem to have that problem on my other bikes.)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Welsh but living in Munich, Germany
    Posts
    324
    I use a rucksack with a mesh back. The bag itself is held off your back, so there is plenty of air circulation.

    The back system is shown here: http://www.deuterusa.com/futac_system.html

    but I couldn't find the rucksack that I use on their webpage. Oh, and it's not nearly as cool looking as the timbuk2 bags!
    Bron

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    The boonies of New England
    Posts
    197
    I do bring my clothes in to work in advance... I pick a couple of my favorite outfits, and leave them at work. Then I have extra incentive - on those days I don't want to ride, I know I have to if I want to wear that great shirt!

    I wear a small Camelback and put my lunch in there (no water pouch) - yes, it's a little sweaty, but I don't like stuff around my waist. Besides - the Camelback is insulated, so my sandwich has a better chance of making it without overheating!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Chi-town
    Posts
    3,265
    Like tulip, I think panniers are wonderful. BUT. I don't have a rack on my Bianchi, as I do on the Larkspur. AND. I have to carry the bike + whatever's on it down a flight of stairs to the basement of the clinic, and back up at the end of the day. SO. I've taken to riding the much lighter Bianchi, and putting my stuff either in a backpack from Target ($12) or my medium Timbuk2 ($60). Of the two, I'd say the backpack is the most comfortable! Of course! The Timbuk2 holds more, however, and looks cooler. Depends how cool I want to think I am, I guess! The stability strap on the Timbuk2 keeps it secure against my back. I sweat under both of them.
    Run like a dachshund! Ride like a superhero! Swim like a three-legged cat!
    TE Bianchi Girls Rock

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    178
    I toss my lunch and coveralls in a backpack. Sure it's hot and heavy, but I think of how amazing I'll feel on rides -without- the backpack.

    Leaving clothes at work is not an option--I was only issued one pair of coveralls and believe you me, they need a washing daily.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    806
    I have 2 Timbuk2 messenger bags, the medium and the small. The medium is what I use most often when I commute. You can fit a small body in there. They're not exactly cheap if you get them off their website, but I've seen them on sale at places like Performance and REI.
    "Only the meek get pinched, the bold survive"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    124
    Timbuk2 bags get my vote as well. The stability strap for the back works well and, the bag also has little reflective straps for close to dusk rides. Yes, they're a bit on the expensive side ($60 for small), but, I considered it an investment as it's relatively indestructible and it may be the last bag I purchase. Okay, so I might want a fun color later on, but it's incredibly durable and well worth the money.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,135
    So... these "stability straps" - they would keep the thing from sliding around? How's that work? Boobage is an issue for me... it's gotta be on one side or the other, or between 'em and that always seems to put things in the wrong place. (Kinda like suspenders, which I always thought were cute in theory...)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, NM
    Posts
    3,099
    I don't know how it would feel to have the weight on one side instead of evenly distributed across my back. I prefer to use a backpack, I got the Traverse Pack from REI and it has a "channel" down the center of the pack that allows airflow. I have a friend that uses panniers but I've ridden with those and the bike always felt back-end heavy.
    Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, champagne in one hand, strawberries in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming: "Yeah Baby! What a Ride!"

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    TE HQ, Hillsboro, OR
    Posts
    1,899
    I've used a Timbuk2 bag for quite some time. I like it quite alot, and agree that the "stability strap" or "3rd leg" is essential to keep it from spinning around. The wide variety of colors that the bags come in are one of the reasons we carry them

    But....... to be perfectly honest..... in March, I was given a Chrome messenger bag at the National Bike Summit. (Chrome was a sponsor) That bag sat in my living room until about 2 months ago, when I decided to give it a try to see how it compared. Wow. I love, love, love it. I love it so much I don't think I'll go back to using my Timbuk2 bag. The Chrome has a great padded main strap, a well place stability strap (no more boobage issues!) and is really well balanced. It's impossible for it to spin, due to how the straps are arranged. The downside is that it's drab grey. Not much to look at, but very functional.

    So, at Interbike in September, I'm going to mosey on over to the Chrome folks and see what they have to offer. Maybe we'll become a Chrome retailer.

    Susan
    Susan Otcenas
    TeamEstrogen.com
    See our newest cycling jerseys
    1-877-310-4592

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    oklahoma
    Posts
    271
    Chrome bags are the best. I never use my Timbuck 2 at least on the bike when commuting now that I have a Chrome. I hope you do carry them they are a great product.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    41
    I've been using a backpack by Arc'Teryx--it's their smallest size and has funky formed mesh panel so it allows lots of airflow between your back and the pack and really keeps things comfy (I ride 17 miles each way). Nice shoulder and waist straps, too--and good weatherproof zippers. The one day/week I do drive I bring exchange towels/pants and supplies, but the small pack is good for a change of clothes, a bit of food, and wallet and nefarious cell phone... I also bring a change of bike clothes--the a.m. ride is usually knickers and l.s. top, afternoons shorts and sleeveless.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •