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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Dallas
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    Hybrids and Distance

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    My husband and I are considering doing the LIVESTRONG ride in Austin. If we do, we know we can do the 10-mile, but I'd love to do the 40. But I have read some comments about road vs. mtn bikes, etc., that are beginning to make me wonder -- can you ride distances on a hybrid upright, or are the distance rides really for road bikes?

    “Hey, clearly failure doesn’t deter me!”

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    8,548
    Quote Originally Posted by pooks
    My husband and I are considering doing the LIVESTRONG ride in Austin. If we do, we know we can do the 10-mile, but I'd love to do the 40. But I have read some comments about road vs. mtn bikes, etc., that are beginning to make me wonder -- can you ride distances on a hybrid upright, or are the distance rides really for road bikes?
    I rode Seattle to Portland, OR (200 miles in two days) on a Raleigh hybrid bike.
    No problems! (well, that is, with the bike itself... a little more training would
    have been smart for me!)
    Mimi Team TE BIANCHISTA
    for six tanks of gas you could have bought a bike.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    2,210
    Sure you can! 40 miles is definitely within reach!

    I have a friend with a hybrid and I've taken her on 15-30 mile rides before (I have a road bike), and I could probaby push her farther if we rode longer distances regularly. She rides at a little slower pace and can't push up hills as efficiently, but I'm sure she could go the distance. She might not be happy with me afterward, but I know she could do it

    Really, I'm not sure there's a limit to how far you can go, as long as you train. Sure, some things might be easier or better for longer distances on a road bike, but it's going to come down to training either way.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,135
    I've ridden several centuries on my hybrids; I just did a week-long tour on one, riding between 55 and 105 miles on my riding days (I volunteered 2 days). I do have slightly smaller tires than the standard - but basically, get out there and ride on it and get in shape and yes, you can do it.
    People who ride a lot of distance get tired of going more slowly and doing more work. THis is a special event. You will, I am sure, find a lot of other hybrids and mountain bikes riding right along with you.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Tustin, CA
    Posts
    1,308
    Although road bikes are best for doing distance on roads (duh!) a century can be done on a hybrid or mountain bike. I've seen (and am always amazed) people doing it. One recommendation is make sure you change out the tires or even the wheels. I would try and get 700 V 25 or 28's on the bikes to lessen road friction. Keep in mind if riding a bike with wider tires, you are doing 3 times the work as a bike with narrow tires. In my first century I rode almost the whole way with two guys on beach cruisers. They were having a good time (and obviously being silly), I struggled on my nice road bike.
    BCIpam - Nature Girl

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,135
    Oh, and as a very rough rule of thumb, you can ride more in a special event than everyday (because of rest stops and food and all that). We "decided" in our group that it's about three times as far. SO... If you can do 12 or 15 comfortably, and not be worn out the next day, then go for the 40. If five or six is what you're happy with... stick with the ten. You don't want to be so miserable that it takes three weeks before you want to get back on a bike.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Sf Bay Area
    Posts
    456
    Yes, I rode the 35-mile Wine Country bike ride on my hybrid. I knew I was working harder than everyone on road bikes, but that made me feel even better. It took me longer and even though I now have a new road bike, I will never give up my hybrid. No wonder my muscles have bulked up over all the years . . . probably from working harder?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Posts
    1,935
    My first century was on hybird. My road bike was in the shop, and we made some wrong turns, and before we knew it...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,391
    You sure can - have you seen the STP thread? Its a big ride out here 200 miles, 2 days - plenty of hybrids and mt. bikes do it. So do unicycles, big wheels and other alternate pedal power machines. Go for it - you'll have fun.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,375

    narrow tires

    Depending on the bike, and your comfort level, the only thing I might suggest is different tires. Slicks might have less rolling resistance on the road. If you've got knobbies or semi-slicks, going to slicks might make the ride a little easier.
    But, you'll be fine, just have a good time.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Dallas
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    Oh thanks. Now I just need to train!

    About slicks and other tires -- do they hold up to the road as well? Are you more likely to get punctures?

    “Hey, clearly failure doesn’t deter me!”

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    1,104
    Pooks - you an' me, we're beginners together this year, both graduated from our couches to hybrids, and riding upright. I've gotten so it's not hard at all to ride ten miles in an evening -- granted, an hour passes, but it's a very pleasant hour! I try to do this a few times a week, and then on the weekends, I'm finding that a 25 - 35 mile ride isn't outrageous! (Earl and I both kind of prefer to keep riding: when we stop, the sweat catches up to us!)

    Keep the gears easy, do that spin thing instead of that mashing thing, and you'll find that miles add up surprisingly fast!

    I've been hearing about the slicks too, and thinking they'd be a good idea. Earl's response was you're going to train hard, get strong and learn to like dirt. That's why you've got knobby tires. I told him that "my ladies in the forum" say that they make you go faster, so I want 'em. I think that flats may indeed be more problem, though! Specialized makes a nice armadillo (that's their tough, flat resistant tire line) slick for us fat tire people -- I think it's a bit narrower, but not like those wee things the roadies run!

    When is your 40 mile ride? I'm nowhere near you, but I could ride it with you from here!

    Karen in Boise

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,375

    yes

    Quote Originally Posted by pooks
    Oh thanks. Now I just need to train!

    About slicks and other tires -- do they hold up to the road as well? Are you more likely to get punctures?
    I was hoping someone else would answer this - be aware that these answers are what I think and someone may indicate I'm wrong.

    On the paved road, slicks will last longer than knobbies - knobbies are made for dirt, on the road they are not as grippy (I'm sure that's the technical term) and the knobs wear down. If you've got thorns and road debri, get slicks with some sort of belt, or add goop or something to them. I am very happy with my Conti Gatorskins and Conti GP 4000 (for my "race" bike), they are both holding up to the tackweed we have around here fairly well. I have tire liners in the gatorskins. I have heard lots of good things about the armadillos, but they don't come in the right size for my wheels.
    Slicks will (probably) not be faster on dirt, they aren't made to grip dirt. They will also not be as sturdy.
    So, if you ride on pavement, get slicks. If you ride on dirt, get knobbies. If you ride on both, try semi-slicks.
    Before I got bent, I had a MTB and 2 wheelsets. One was set up with big knobbies for off-road and one with narrow slicks for pavement. Worked pretty well, since I was too lazy to change tires, and it's easy to just swap out the whole wheel.
    Be aware, if you decide to buy some slicks, that there are more than enough wheel/tire sizes to confuse you forever, and get tires that will fit your rims.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    380
    I used to do the NY/NJ MS30 ride and one year did the MS60 on my hybrid. DH and I did a cycling tour of Italy on hybrids. You can certainly do distances on a hybrid and quite comfortably as well.
    Brina

    "Truth goes through three stages: first it is ridiculed; then violently opposed; finally, it’s accepted as being self-evident." Schopenhauer

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Dallas
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    1,532
    Karen -- the livestrong ride we're considering doing is in Austin in October. Fly on down! That would REALLY give me a reason to have to train harder. LOL

    “Hey, clearly failure doesn’t deter me!”

 

 

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