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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Bayside, New York
    Posts
    499

    Training for Century, need to know how to use HR Manitor

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    Hi all,

    I am pretty new to cycling, started last summer. This year my goal is to complete a century ride in August. It will be a flat ride with one long hill towards the end. Reading articles about centuries I came across the importance of HR manitors, so I went and bought one. So, I was wondering if any of you who use heart rate manitors can share the info on how you use them. In what % of MHR do you train, and actually try to ride the century in. Your info will be appreciated as always Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    82
    Good work on getting an HR monitor. It is a great training tool. Do you do spin classes at a gym by any chance? Sometimes the instructor will tell you how much time you should spent at what % of your maximum. I think the rough forumla for max heartrate is 226 minus your age. Do a search on the net and you should turn up some suggestions for building a training program. I've used my monitor for almost 2 years and love it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Marin County CA
    Posts
    5,958
    I agree - there are a lot of good books out there which can give you training programs. Most of your riding should be done at an endurance pace - I believe, but am not certain, that this is about your 80% of max level.

    I think Veronica trains with a HRM and when she gets back from her trip she can probably give some pointers. I gave up the HRM years ago and haven't looked back!
    Sarah

    When it's easy, ride hard; when it's hard, ride easy.


    2011 Volagi Liscio
    2010 Pegoretti Love #3 "Manovelo"
    2011 Mercian Vincitore Special
    2003 Eddy Merckx Team SC - stolen
    2001 Colnago Ovalmaster Stars and Stripes

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    North Central Florida
    Posts
    3,387

    Heart Rate Book

    "Sally Edwards' Heart Zone Training: Exercise Smart, Stay Fit and Live Longer"

    Sally Edwards has one of the more popular, in-depth HR training books out there.

    Nanci
    ***********
    "...I'm like the cycling version of the guy in Flowers for Algernon." Mike Magnuson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Bayside, New York
    Posts
    499
    Thank you all for responses... I do take cycling classes 3 times a week, one double class. What I noticed is that when my cycling instructor says she has 80% mhr, I usually have about 82-85%. Not sure if it's good or bad, maybe she has different resistance on her bike, maybe she is using her VO2 better, who knows.... I know that on my sprints i go to about 92-95% and that I think is pretty good according to some info i found on net. All in all , my average is about 75% for a cycling class.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    2,033
    Just note that even a double cycling class will hardly prepare you for a century. MY opinion.

    Long term endurance training in the 130-140 bpm range is the basis everyone should do. So I hear.
    It's a little secret you didn't know about us women. We're all closet Visigoths.

    2008 Roy Hinnen O2 - Selle SMP Glider
    2009 Cube Axial WLS - Selle SMP Glider
    2007 Gary Fisher HiFi Plus - Specialized Alias

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Bayside, New York
    Posts
    499
    I def. understand that, I am doing double classes just for the heck of it, plus the instructor is great and it's a shame to miss a class with her. On the other side i am trying to make up for the rides that i can't do outside during the week, On weekends i am planning to do long rides.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    82
    Quote Originally Posted by FreshNewbie
    I def. understand that, I am doing double classes just for the heck of it, plus the instructor is great and it's a shame to miss a class with her. On the other side i am trying to make up for the rides that i can't do outside during the week, On weekends i am planning to do long rides.
    While there may be no substitute for actual road miles, I've found that my endurance and climbing skills have improved since I've started spinning at the gym. I used to use my trainer at home and watch Spinervals DVDs, but I wasn't pushing myself as hard as I should have.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Bayside, New York
    Posts
    499
    I agree, on the first ride this season I didn't feel like i was out of shape, in fact i felt much stronger physically than last year. So, yes the classes do help a lot, esp if you combine them with yoga.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Marin County CA
    Posts
    5,958
    Spin classes are GREAT for maintaining fitness during the week. I can't build fitness with spin, because my rides all need to be much longer. But I work fulltime and 2 classes a week plus an occasional "hooky" ride here and there mean I don't lose fitness between my weekend epic rides.
    Sarah

    When it's easy, ride hard; when it's hard, ride easy.


    2011 Volagi Liscio
    2010 Pegoretti Love #3 "Manovelo"
    2011 Mercian Vincitore Special
    2003 Eddy Merckx Team SC - stolen
    2001 Colnago Ovalmaster Stars and Stripes

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    255

    How often to Spin?

    with the rain we've had, I've started taking a spinning class now and then, and I need to step it up. Would twice a week be to much, along with whatever training ride I can get in on the weekends?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Marin County CA
    Posts
    5,958
    Quote Originally Posted by shadon
    with the rain we've had, I've started taking a spinning class now and then, and I need to step it up. Would twice a week be to much, along with whatever training ride I can get in on the weekends?
    That shoud be fine.
    Sarah

    When it's easy, ride hard; when it's hard, ride easy.


    2011 Volagi Liscio
    2010 Pegoretti Love #3 "Manovelo"
    2011 Mercian Vincitore Special
    2003 Eddy Merckx Team SC - stolen
    2001 Colnago Ovalmaster Stars and Stripes

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Middle Earth
    Posts
    3,997
    I understand that 70-75% of max is a good zone to sit in, however, every now and again you should train at just a little higher and it will increase your body's ability to cope with the lactate that builds in your muscles.

    I think I have that right? Anyone?


    Courage does not always roar. Sometimes, it is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying,
    "I will try again tomorrow".


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bar Harbor, Maine
    Posts
    165
    Quote Originally Posted by RoadRaven
    I understand that 70-75% of max is a good zone to sit in, however, every now and again you should train at just a little higher and it will increase your body's ability to cope with the lactate that builds in your muscles.

    I think I have that right? Anyone?
    That is my understanding as well. Training at 70-75% of max is excellent for building and maintaining a base fitness level. But to increase your fitness you periodically need to push out of that zone so that your body can adapt to increased demands on your cardiovascular system. Combined with the hard work you also need to schedule in down time so that your body can rest and repair.

    Joe Friel (Cyclist's Training Bible) suggests a schedule for over 40 athletes that includes 2-3 weeks of training (with increasing intensity of training over those weeks) followed by a week of low intensity training to aid in recovery.

    This is my second year of following this training method and I'm definitely seeing significant improvements in my fitness.
    "It never gets easier, you just go faster." -- Greg LeMond

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    9,351
    My weekday training rides with Coach Troy I push myself to stay around 85% of my max HR or higher during each set. For me that means staying around 170 - 180 bpm. I typically do two videos back to back now. But I didn't start there.

    Maintaining such a high heart rate is harder to do when I ride outside. Outside is more fun, but from a training point of view, I get more from doing a video.

    My long weekend rides I try to keep my heart rate below 165 bpm - 80% of my max, even when climbing. I was pretty stoked that the last time I climbed Hamilton (5 miles, 7% average grade) I averaged 165 bpm. And on Sierra Rd. (3 miles, 10% average grade) I averaged 168. And that was 75 miles into the ride.

    V.
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

 

 

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