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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
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    Some women & cycling in India

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    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,101
    Interesting, Shooting Star. There seems to be a lot of barriers for women who want to ride, so I give her a lot of credit. There is a large Indian population in the town I used to live in, about a quarter of the kids who went to high school with my kids. From what I've observed and from what my kids told me, physical activity was not encouraged in their culture. When I think about it, I cannot think of any (men or women) people of Indian descent coming on any group rides or events I have led. Unusual, given the population numbers in my area.
    Obviously, this is just an observation on my part, and I hope it doesn't sound racist.
    Last edited by Crankin; 05-06-2016 at 04:36 AM.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    14,645
    I miss Kalidurga. Don't know whether she is Indian-American, or only her handle.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    I don't think it's racist, Crankin. Just evidence that there are differences amongst the various cultures and even within some cultures. I lived in suburban Chicago in a very mixed community with cultures of every kind, including a large percentage of Indians right in my own apartment complex. In the almost seven years I lived there, I honestly can't remember seeing an Indian on a bicycle. Hispanics, Russian, Vietnamese and so on, yes, but Indians, no. Keep in mind though, that there are distinct classes in Indian culture and most of the Indians in my area were the professional class. That may have had something to do with it. By the way, in my area, I bicycled so much I was known as the "bike lady" by all the cultures.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 05-06-2016 at 07:03 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,981
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    Interesting, Shooting Star. There seems to be a lot of barriers for women who want to ride, so I give her a lot of credit. There is a large Indian population in the town I used to live in, about a quarter of the kids who went to high school with my kids. From what I've observed and from what my kids told me, physical activity was not encouraged in their culture. When I think about it, I cannot think of any (men or women) people of Indian descent coming on any group rides or events I have led. Unusual, given the population numbers in my area.
    Obviously, this is just an observation on my part, and I hope it doesn't sound racist.
    This is unusual since this is the U.S. In terms of cycling mode share in the big Canadian cities where I've lived, it's only after 5 yrs. when local cycling builds regular momentum that to me, I notice more those of Asian descent and some blacks cycling either alone or going to cycling fun events. I'm not talking about hardcore training rides at all. To me, it tends to be assimilated folks like myself or with a stronger command of English language fluency.

    She has a great blog. You might her posts of interest since she is a psychiatrist.

    We forget that even among different cycling communities, it is perceived as a clique with its own language, etc. Not intentional but it can be initially off-putting/isolating to outsiders. It's important for enthusiasts like ourselves to make initial conscious effort. Yea, the spandex perception doesn't help.
    Last edited by shootingstar; 05-07-2016 at 07:41 AM.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    To be sure, the spandex thing does not help. Couldn't agree, more. Even in my own family, I get teased about it even after explaining the actual benefits of bike specific clothing. With my friends that are just casual bike riders, the only thing I insist on when they ride with me is to be visible and wear a helmet. I'll supply a hit viz vest or pull over for them to wear if they don't have anything and always have an extra helmet on hand, too.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    2,045
    There is at least one male Indian cyclist in the Saturday group ride I sometimes go on. The one I remember meeting is a physician....

    And can we count Owlie? She hasn't been posting much lately but I think one of her parents is from India.
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