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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
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    1,039

    Hysterectomy! OMG!!!

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    After a few years of not understanding what was wrong with my body and experiencing extreme back pain I finally have an answer. It appears that my uterus is really good at growing fibroids. In fact one is actually larger than my uterus. I have 5 total. Four are on the outside of my uterus and 1 is inside and suspected of causing my devastatingly heavy periods. I have also been using an IUD for about 6 years. The ultrasound showed my IUD at the bottom of my uterus about to be expelled but actually stuck in my internal fibroid. IUD removal was less than pleasant I just don't even want to talk about that Anyways I'm 39, don't have kids and am not planning any. I have never had surgery before so this is hella scary right now. My energy levels are soooooo low too it's completely frustrating. Riding my bike is a challenge b/c the fibroids are actually shoving everything up against my diaphragm so I can't breath well. The fatigue I thought was anemia but now it seems to be persisting much longer. My doctor says I must have a very high pain tolerance. Maybe that's it and I hit my pain threshold? The large fibroid is pressing on nerves which makes me have a lot of back and abdominal pain. I feel like I am pregnant and if you look close you can actually see my stomach poofed out larger on one side than the other. Painting my toenails and breathing cannot happen simultaneously anymore. It seems these things have grown really quickly over the last 2 months.

    I'm just scared and well... scared. Any insights on what to expect following surgery? Suggestions before surgery? I'm a rookie at this surgery bit and very freaked out about it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    IL/FL
    Posts
    3,863
    Your circumstances sound almost exactly like my wife's, she tells everyone "best surgery EVER", she wished she'd done it sooner. It took her about six weeks to recover but the constant exhaustion, pain, endless heavy periods, were over immediately.

    As far as what expect, you will need some help around the house for the first week or so, it's a big surgery and you will be weak and very sleepy. She slept a LOT the first three weeks but also made sure she moved some every day, as the weeks went by she started very gently exercising, by the six week mark she went back to work and while that made her tired at first she settled in quickly.

    You will feel much better once you get through this, my honey says it gave her her life back.

    Electra Townie 7D

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,957
    So sorry to hear this, but it will be a relief after it is done. I had a full hysterectomy (including ovaries) in 2008 and while there was a recovery period it wasn't near as bad as I was afraid it would be. I felt much better in certain ways, though of course I had to back off on my activities for a period of time, rested, walked slowly, etc. until I was cleared to do more.

    There is also another forum that might be useful to you, HysterSisters. They have been around for years and was very helpful to me both pre-and-post op, how to deal with surgical menopause, etc. Lots of good resources and forums. They still send me emails on the anniversary of my surgery and on my birthdays. I just looked at it and while it appears to have more advertising than it once did, at the core it appears to still have the same resources. Look past the ads and fancy videos if they distract you, it is worth it. I can't express how helpful this site was to me when I was going through it.

    Wishing you the best, and please keep us posted. Feel free to PM me if you like.

  4. #4
    Jolt is offline Dodging the potholes...
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    1,677
    It sounds like having the surgery would ultimately make your quality of life much better, once you get through the recovery period. Do you know if they would be doing it laparoscopically or vaginally vs. open? That will make a difference in how much recovery there is.
    Last edited by Jolt; 08-20-2015 at 04:32 AM.
    2011 Surly LHT
    1995 Trek 830

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,856
    Quote Originally Posted by Jolt View Post
    It sounds like having the surgery would ultimately make your quality of life much better, once you get through the recovery period. Do you know if they would be doing it laparoscopically or vaginally vs. open? That will make a difference in how much recovery there is.
    I was thinking the same thing.

    Speaking from my own experience with totally different surgery as well as some friends' recent experiences -- do what you can in advance to make things easier while you're recovering. For example you might want to stock up on paper plates, cups, bowls and plastic utensils so that you won't have to worry about washing dishes. Also stock upon whatever non-perishable or freezable foods you will want. Bear in mind that your appetite might be a bit off due to the side effects of pain relievers, so you might want to get some foods that you like when your stomach doesn't feel great. For example crackers, ginger ale, chicken soup, pasta.

    If your home has more than one floor, you might want to arrange things so you can live on one level for a week or so rather than having to go up and down stairs.

    It certainly sounds like things will be much better after the surgery. Good luck!

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
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    Gone but not forgotten:
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,940
    I had a similar situation 10 years ago. I only had one tumor, but it was so large it pushed out of my uterus and nestled in my bowel causing all kinds of problems. The post surgery was not plesant, BUT I was up and back to it in 8 weeks.The most, most important thing is that you respect the incision. DO NOT go against the post surgery orders. Don't go up and down stairs too much, don't lift anything. You will need help for sure. A few days post I started walking, to the corner, then around the corner, then down the block. It helped a lot.

    You will feel SO much better when it is over. And really it is the first week that is tough. You can ask us anything, don't hold back.

    Oh and get some colace for after surgery, the first time you have to "go" it can be painful with the incision. The pain meds post surgery can be very constipating and you DO NOT want that with a belly incision.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN
    Posts
    1,039
    Thanks you guys, it really helps getting real life feedback. My surgical incision will be similar to a C section but not quite as large. Since the one fibroid is so big they couldn't do it laparoscopically. I can't believe this is happening right now. I just graduated school in May so I've been job hunting all this time. I have been through a few interviews and have two good offers and then this. I thought this was gonna be an easy laparoscope surgery removal of 1 fibroid on the inside of my uterus initially. It wasn't until my doctor got a hold of the full ultrasound report that she saw all the extra fibroids. This is awful timing. I'm having to push back start dates, explain this to potential employers and even reconsidered how difficult each job may be due to recovery time for this. As scared as I am, I really just want this to be over with so I can start recovering. I'm excited to hear many good post op results. Sounds like the first week will be rough. It is a good thing my BF is a PT and he's staying home with me that week. I love him so much.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,957
    Hang in there, and while I'm sorry to read they can't do it laparscoply I AM glad your getting this addressed now. I've had two surgeries in that area, both methods. Don't hesitate to contact me if I can help, I didn't move THAT far away! It's great that he is able to stay home and help!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,856
    Congrats on the graduate degree!!

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Best wishes for a smooth surgery, quick healing and a minimum of complications with the new job. (((((WindingRoad)))))
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,144
    Congrats on the graduation and the job! You will get through the surgery.
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    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    543
    Good luck WindingRoad, surgery IS scary. When I was facing a possible hysterectomy, I happened upon this site called HysterSisters (www.hystersisters.com) which was VERY helpful and supportive. It's set up similar to TE, a forum you can ask questions and get personal help. My main worry back then was how soon could I get back on my bike... I ended up not having surgery after all and menopause shortly solved the problems I was having, so all's well that ends well I guess, but everyone else said the same they are saying here, and no one regretted having the surgery after they recovered. Best of luck, and healing wishes your way.
    "Don't go too fast, but I go pretty far"

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saskatoon, Sask.
    Posts
    345
    I do wish they'd stop calling this surgery "hysterectomy". This goes back to Victorian times when the womb was thought to be the source of female "hysteria".
    Would it be so hard to just call it a uterectomy, which is what it is.
    Queen of the sea beasts

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    (actually it's the other way around. Hysteria is the inappropriate word, not hysterectomy, which just means removing the uterus. If you wanted to go with the Latin roots it would be uteramotio or something similar ... for whatever reason, surgical terms tend to use the Greek roots ...)
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    california
    Posts
    1,204
    hoping you feel well informed and at peace with the surgery Windingroad!!! and that it all goes well

    Quote Originally Posted by nuliajuk View Post
    I do wish they'd stop calling this surgery "hysterectomy". This goes back to Victorian times when the womb was thought to be the source of female "hysteria".
    Would it be so hard to just call it a uterectomy, which is what it is.
    agree on using the term uterectomy instead!!

    The ancient Egyptians and then the Greeks thought a womans 'hysterical' disorders were caused by the uterus moving around in the body and then we had medieval european christians saying it was demonic possession and then the Victorians gave us a choice between hysterectomies for hysterical disorders or being committed to an insane asylum. thankfully medical science has evolved.
    ‘The negative feelings we all have can be addictive…just as the positive…it’s up to
    us to decide which ones we want to choose and feed”… Pema Chodron

 

 

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