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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    32

    Bone soreness at inner edge of pelvic bone

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    Have been reading the tips, but not seeing my difficulty here. I don't chafe so I don't use chamois cream, but my bones get sore. in order to get my sit bones anywhere near my saddle, I have to sit up very straight on the saddle as tall as I can. I have moved my seat forward a ridiculous amount. Did 60 miles the other day and my discomfort is not in my butt where my sit bones are, but in the very inside edge of my pelvis, right next to delicates. I ride on a Terry Cite X gel and was told that maybe I need a wider saddle, but it's already the widest Terry offers. What gives? I also have the nose tilted up a bit as I have to keep hiking myself back on my seat after sliding forward. Nowhere around my home to get a proper fitting. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    That's a huge, cushy saddle. It's likely causing the area in question to be compromised.

    I think you should try something more minimal, like maybe a Specialized Ruby saddle, and see how that goes (They have a 30 day return policy). It would be hard to diagnose what is wrong because every part of your current saddle has the opportunity to aggravate you and compress tissue and muscle against bone. Measure your sitbones before buying anything else, regardless.

    Maybe something like this? (It's available in several sizes).

    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/ftb...ns-ruby-expert

    I used a Ruby for about 4 years, now I use a Romin. (A more cutout-aggressive version of the Ruby). The Romin is considered mens, the Ruby womens, but Specialized saddles tend to be unisex. You just have to select the correct width.

    Also, have you had a good bike fitting so that you know if the saddle is placed correctly for you fore and aft? It sounds like your saddle is too far back.

    Edit: just realized about the bike fitting issue. Can you move the saddle forward?
    Last edited by Muirenn; 10-03-2014 at 10:55 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    Here, read this on saddle comfort and fit.

    http://biketouringnews.com/component...-bike-touring/
    Last edited by Muirenn; 10-03-2014 at 11:05 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    And it wouldn't hurt to read this on bike fit.

    http://www.bikefit.com/s-13-road-bikes.aspx
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,846
    I'm wondering if the rails on that saddle just aren't long enough for proper placement on your bike.

    What type of bike do you have and how wide are your sit bones? If you need to measure them, there's a thread that tells you how.

    http://forums.teamestrogen.com/showthread.php?t=39475

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Weir, TX
    Posts
    403
    Quote Originally Posted by Awsmile View Post
    was told that maybe I need a wider saddle, but it's already the widest Terry offers. What gives?
    You probably do need a wider saddle. Unfortunately, a common pattern is that the wider the saddle, the more it is padded, and often it's the padding that causes problems in areas other than the sit bones, or they just flat out don't work well for road bike riding position. I've tried almost all of the Terry models and none of them work for me at all - my sit bones are literally hanging over the sides, which makes for a VERY uncomfy ride.

    If you haven't had your sit bones measured, start there - you can DIY it or have someone at a shop do it, but until you do you won't know what you are looking for in your next saddle. By DIY measurements I was able to figure that my sit bones were about 165mm - then a few years ago I happened to get a pelvic x-ray and I got a printed copy of it and I was able to actually measure my sit bones on the x-ray... I am 168mm.

    I have to date, found exactly two saddles that have worked for me. The now discontinued brooks B68 (I own 3), and the Selle SMP TRK - I really like the design of that saddle a lot (the cut-out is awesome), but it's too padded and I don't like the plastic covering (it's slippery when sweaty), however all of the lesser padded leather-covered SMP saddles are too narrow. I have tried a few other saddles that were okay on my sit bones, but the overall shape of the saddle caused other problems - typically they were too pear shaped for me. The "T" shape of the brooks works very well for me.
    '08 Felt FW40 w/ Brooks b68's'
    '77 Takara Mixte (errand bike) w/ Brooks b68's'

    Measure your sitbones! Mine: 6 5/8" (168mm)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,846
    The Cite X is 175 mm wide.

    http://www.terrybicycles.com/Saddles...X-Gel-Saddle_2

    Another possibility is a problem with the cutout -- too much pressure on the edges.

    But the first thing is to find out how wide a saddle the OP needs.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    4,713
    Quote Originally Posted by Awsmile View Post
    Have been reading the tips, but not seeing my difficulty here. I don't chafe so I don't use chamois cream, but my bones get sore. in order to get my sit bones anywhere near my saddle, I have to sit up very straight on the saddle as tall as I can. I have moved my seat forward a ridiculous amount. Did 60 miles the other day and my discomfort is not in my butt where my sit bones are, but in the very inside edge of my pelvis, right next to delicates. I ride on a Terry Cite X gel and was told that maybe I need a wider saddle, but it's already the widest Terry offers. What gives? I also have the nose tilted up a bit as I have to keep hiking myself back on my seat after sliding forward. Nowhere around my home to get a proper fitting. Any thoughts?
    Ah, I know that feeling. You mentioned you keep sliding forward and you have moved the saddle forward. It sounds like you might be riding a saddle that's too "pear-shaped" for you (given how wide the Cite X is, I wouldn't be surprised), and the pedaling motion is pushing you forward onto the narrower part of the saddle, so that you're putting pressure on the bone forward of your sitbones. Measuring your sitbones can't hurt to make sure that you don't need a wider saddle.
    At least I don't leave slime trails.
    http://wholecog.wordpress.com/

    2009 Giant Avail 3 |Specialized Jett 143

    2013 Charge Filter Apex| Specialized Jett 143
    1996(?) Giant Iguana 630|Specialized Riva


    Saving for the next one...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    Quote Originally Posted by Owlie View Post
    Ah, I know that feeling. You mentioned you keep sliding forward and you have moved the saddle forward. It sounds like you might be riding a saddle that's too "pear-shaped" for you (given how wide the Cite X is, I wouldn't be surprised), and the pedaling motion is pushing you forward onto the narrower part of the saddle, so that you're putting pressure on the bone forward of your sitbones. Measuring your sitbones can't hurt to make sure that you don't need a wider saddle.
    I wondered about the pear-shaped issue, too. But it's hard to say from the description. It could be just the padding that is causing irritation.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    32

    measuring sit bones

    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    That's a huge, cushy saddle. It's likely causing the area in question to be compromised.

    I think you should try something more minimal, like maybe a Specialized Ruby saddle, and see how that goes (They have a 30 day return policy). It would be hard to diagnose what is wrong because every part of your current saddle has the opportunity to aggravate you and compress tissue and muscle against bone. Measure your sitbones before buying anything else, regardless.

    Maybe something like this? (It's available in several sizes).

    http://www.specialized.com/us/en/ftb...ns-ruby-expert

    I used a Ruby for about 4 years, now I use a Romin. (A more cutout-aggressive version of the Ruby). The Romin is considered mens, the Ruby womens, but Specialized saddles tend to be unisex. You just have to select the correct width.

    Also, have you had a good bike fitting so that you know if the saddle is placed correctly for you fore and aft? It sounds like your saddle is too far back.

    Edit: just realized about the bike fitting issue. Can you move the saddle forward?
    Thanks for the help from all of you who replied. Now you'll know what a newbie I really am - I haven't found anything on exactly HOW to measure my sitbones. Another thread said she'd tried flour, playdoh, and feet straight up in the air. Sounds a little wonky... Can you direct me to a good discussion of how to measure? I should also mention that I'm 62 and the estrogen is long, long gone, so my delicates are a good bit more delicate by the time I hit 50 miles than some of my younger rider friends! Thanks for any help. I'm loving this new sport but have so much to learn.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,083
    Plenty of people don't know how :-) Someone else will be able to direct you to a description, but for starters - try just sitting on a hard chair or on your hands, rocking back and forth until you can clearly feel your sit bones. They sort of protrude down like a lumpy knob when you sit on a hard surface. It's good to get an idea of what they feel like before you start rolling around on your back :-D

    I think I measured the distance between mine by rocking around on top of a sheet of paper on top of a yoga mat. But you can also do it by lying on your back, feeling with your hands and using a measuring tape, with help from a hubby or friend. Some bike shops have these squishy pillow things that take the imprint. It's not a very exact science, so I'd recommend you measure several times.

    Many people find a harder saddle that fits well is more comfortable than a soft saddle. Sounds counter-intuitive, but having support exactly where you need it and nowhere else is a good thing.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    Quote Originally Posted by Awsmile View Post
    Thanks for the help from all of you who replied. Now you'll know what a newbie I really am - I haven't found anything on exactly HOW to measure my sitbones. Another thread said she'd tried flour, playdoh, and feet straight up in the air. Sounds a little wonky... Can you direct me to a good discussion of how to measure? I should also mention that I'm 62 and the estrogen is long, long gone, so my delicates are a good bit more delicate by the time I hit 50 miles than some of my younger rider friends! Thanks for any help. I'm loving this new sport but have so much to learn.
    Tah Dah! (From Sky King's Website. I'm too lazy to retype. Actually, I'm doing tons of homework. So. ).

    Measure your sit bones:

    We could get all fancy and purchase memory foam or drop some dollars on a fancy gel seat specifically designed to measure sit bones and assist in determining the proper saddle width but we hate to spend money when things at hand will work just as well.

    Three inexpensive options for measuring Sit Bones:

    The Flour method

    Take a gallon size zip lock bag, fill with enough flour for about a two inch flour cushion when the bag is lying on a flat surface. Place this bag on a hard flat surface – table or chair (we use a piano bench) Sit on the bag (preferably bare skin), mimic your bike position. Now stand up without disturbing the bag. Those two dimples/impressions in the flour are from your sit bones.

    The Play Dough method

    To make your dough:

    One part salt, two parts flour, mix with water until it’s right for modeling.

    Roll about an inch thick, cover with aluminum foil to keep it from being sticky, place dough w/ foil on a low bench, once again sit on dough (bare skin is best) and lean forward to approximate riding position since the sitbones become more narrow as you lean forward. Remove foil and allow to dry a little. The bones impression will become white first.

    The Measurement

    Take a millimeter tape measure and measure the impressions, recording your findings.

    1. The inside edge to inside edge

    2. Center of depression to center of depression, if easier, place a marble in each depression and measure the marbles.

    3. Outside edge to outside edge

    Center-to-center measurement correlates with the spot on a saddle that bears the weight of the sit bones. The saddle “cheeks”.
    Outside to outside measurement is a consideration for some types of saddles, such as the Brooks that have metal rails, you do not want to have your sit bones resting on the metal rails. General rule of thumb – your saddle width should be about 2 centimeters wider than outside sit bone measurement. Again, you want your sit bones resting on the “checks” of the saddle and you want some wiggle room for movement as you are touring.
    Inside to inside may be necessary if you plan to use a saddle with a cut out, to ensure the sit bones clear any large center cutout in the saddle. The inside bones falling into the ‘moat’ so to speak, causes a lot of pain in the bones surrounding the “soft tissue” area. To clear the cutout, you need about 20 mm extra space in between the inside distance of the sit bones. So, if the cutout is 60 mm, your inside distance is 80, then you have just enough clearance.
    The Hand Method(s) of measuring

    Sit on your hands, and feel for the two bones of your butt. They feel like elbows poking down into your hands.

    Put the tip of your index fingers right under the part of the bones that is pushing hardest into the chair. (squish the very tip of your fingers between the chair and your sit bones)

    Lift your butt from the chair leaving your hands on the chair, and have your assistant measure the distance between your fingertips. This is pretty much your center-to-center.

    Then put your fingertips against the outsides of the bones. Push them right into the bones so they are on the outside of the bones. Lift your butt from the chair and have an assistant measure the distance between your fingertips. This is pretty much your outside.

    Some people have sit bones that angle a lot from front to back. The “sits” are heavy thickened portions of the rami area of the pelvis and can have unique personalities of their own. You can measure again on the forward part of the heavy “elbow” bit if you can feel that yours have a definite angle. The forward portion of the heavy thick part of the bone is what your weight rests on more when you are in a more aero position. DON’T measure the thin blade like portion that is in your crotch, that is the rami and you do not want a saddle there. Measure from your backside.

    Repeat your measurements a few times, average them out if you want.

    You can also get these measurements by lying on your back with your knees to your chest holding a measuring tape and poking around for landmarks.

    The Cutout


    Cut Out on a Brooks B17 Imperial
    Purchasing a saddle with a cut out can be beneficial if you have soft tissue pressure. An easy way to help determine if you might be a good candidate is to sit (commando or in thin underwear)on a very hard surface, feet flat on the floor, pedaling distance apart. Lean forward from the hips, keeping your back straight and place your elbows on your knees. If you soft tissue is feeling overly squished you may want to try a saddle with a cut out. Do some forum research, some people love them, other’s find the edges of the cut out equally irritating. Assuming you have a good bike fit and proper saddle height, consider adjusting the angle of your current saddle as well to see if that relieves soft tissue pressure.

    Length

    Years ago some saddle manufacturers started adding a short version to their line. Historically the short version came about for women riding in skirts and dresses, the longer nose would catch on the dress, making mounting and dismounting more challenging. Now a short version is more about personal comfort. Reading Forums and blog post about saddle fit there are numerous opinions about both. Sky King’s Fizik Vitesse Tri is a “woman’s” saddle but it isn’t any shorter in the nose than a Brooks Swallow.

    Conclusion
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    Is there any way for you to load up your bike and drive to a fitter in another town? That will make a huge difference in your comfort.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by sarahspins View Post
    By DIY measurements I was able to figure that my sit bones were about 165mm - then a few years ago I happened to get a pelvic x-ray and I got a printed copy of it and I was able to actually measure my sit bones on the x-ray... I am 168mm.

    I have to date, found exactly two saddles that have worked for me. The now discontinued brooks B68 (I own 3), and the Selle SMP TRK - I really like the design of that saddle a lot (the cut-out is awesome), but it's too padded and I don't like the plastic covering (it's slippery when sweaty), however all of the lesser padded leather-covered SMP saddles are too narrow. I have tried a few other saddles that were okay on my sit bones, but the overall shape of the saddle caused other problems - typically they were too pear shaped for me. The "T" shape of the brooks works very well for me.
    I know this is an old thread, but I'm gonna ask anyway - have you since found anything else that works? I think we must be sit-bone-twins, I'm the same measurement and the Selle SMP TRK is the only saddle I've found that works for me. I always want to keep trying though, in case perfection is still out there.

 

 

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