Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 29
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    18

    New here, and trying to pick a "pregnant" bike!

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    So I am a HORRIBLE decision maker! I decided I wanted a bike when my husband started riding a lot. I have five kids who all ride bikes around the rural area where we live as well. I am almost three months pregnant and decided to buy a bike I can ride until it's fall and too cold and I'm too big.

    I thought first I wanted a cruiser. So I rode a bunch, and it turns out I don't like them. Then I moved on to a comfort hybrid. I liked those a lot- especially a 2013 Raleigh Venture 4.0- http://archive.raleighusa.com/archiv...enture-4-0-13/

    Today I rode (among many other things) a Venture 3.0 and a Venture 4.0. I pulled up a comparison on their website- not sure if it will link or not, but here is what I found- http://www.raleighusa.com/compare-bikes?bikeid=1308 If I go with one of those, is the 4.0 worth the extra $150? I don't know enough about components to really get it, you know? And my husband is still a relative beginner- he had a friend help him choose his bike.

    Are there comparable bikes I should try?

    The master plan is to have this baby, and then if I have any remaining sanity as the mother of six, buy a flat bar road bike (Jamis Coda Sport? Trek FX 7.2? I don't have to decide that one for awhile!) so I can ride bike paths with my husband, and keep whatever I buy to ride now to ride around the roads/ farms at home with the kids. Husband even said he wants the same type bike to ride with us.

    (Gosh that sounds like we are going to purchase a lot of bikes in the near future...)

    Thanks so much for any help! I have read this forum for weeks and learned so much- everybody is so nice here!

    Melissa

  2. #2
    Jolt is offline Dodging the potholes...
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Southern Maine
    Posts
    1,677
    What about an older, non-suspension mountain bike? You could put a riser bar on to be more upright and accommodate that growing belly. Or, if you wanted to spring for something newer/nicer, a Surly Troll with a riser stem/bar. Slick tires can be put on for street riding. Good luck, and congratulations on the coming new addition! Six kids--wow! I give you props for being able to manage such a big family and stay sane, not sure I would be able to do that.
    2011 Surly LHT
    1995 Trek 830

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    18
    I haven't even looked at mountain bikes. Would they be preferable because they lack the suspension? It might be worth considering because some of the roads we ride around here are gravel. My two oldest girls have mountain bikes (not super nice ones but they ride them everywhere.)

    I love the look of the Troll, but I think I'd rather spend less on a bike now and more on a bike I can ride with my husband after things get back to normal around here. It will be good to ride something in the meantime to get my riding skills dusted off and the muscles I've neglected toned up a little.

    I just want to find something easy and comfortable to cruise the neighborhood, but nice enough that I won't be frustrated riding. I'm willing to consider all suggestions- I really am a beginner. I am feeling a small time crunch however, since my days of being able to comfortably ride in the immediate future are dwindling...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    How about an Electra Townie? That way, if you tip to the side, you can more easily catch yourself by putting your foot on the ground. The Electra has 'flat foot' technology, so the position allows you to extend your legs to the front, while being closer to the ground. Other bikes are designed to position the rider much higher.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    18
    I tried the Townies and while it was really fun to ride, it felt a bit heavy and bulky to me. (My husband absolutely LOVED the Townies- I wouldn't be surprised to see him choose one for himself for his "putter around" bike!) Which made me sad because they are SOOOO cute! I am having a very difficult time separating my desire for a bike I love the look of and a bike that "feels" right. (Why do girl bikes not come in more colors, by the way? And NOT purple? Granted, color is not a deal breaker, but it sure might make me happy!)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Okay, there are some other bikes with forward pedal (flat foot) technology, though. Like the Trek Pure. (I'll google and get back to you).

    Edit: okay, this page talks about forward-crank. If you scroll down, it lists quite a few models available. I just think it's safer. Especially if you are not used to riding. Falling off a bike is not a good idea.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 07-23-2014 at 06:10 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    18
    I just looked at the Trek Pure Lowstep and it is super cute! I'll have to track that down and try it. I'm assuming it's advantage over the Raleigh is the lack of a suspension system? (And if I'm totally wrong, please correct me!)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Forward crank or forward pedal. This means that instead of making the bike seat high from the ground to achieve the proper leg extension, the legs extend to the front, and the seat is lower. This means your feet can touch the ground while seated. For most bikes, the feet don't quite touch while seated. (You see a lot of recreational cyclists with the seats too low). If you don't have the proper leg extension, back pain and leg pain can result. The forward pedal, where you sit as though you are on a recliner rather than as if you were on a kitchen stool, solves this. More comfortable, and feels more secure. Especially for a new cyclist, or for someone with an interest in avoiding falling. (Uh, like you. ).

    Oh, the women's Electra Townie's are available in purple, and are made with step-through frames. Were you looking at the men's versions? They are quite a lot beefier.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 07-23-2014 at 07:08 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    18
    I see! (I actually rode the Townie in orange- my favorite! Purple is probably my least favorite color, but it seems like the only color besides grey or black that most girl bikes come in is purple. I just don't think I could buy a purple bike...)

    So it's more about the sitting position, then. That makes a lot of sense. I definitely don't want to be falling. I am reasonably tall, too, at 5'8", so it's a long fall if I go down!

    Thanks so much for the explanation- that definitely gives me more to go on!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    18
    What about something like the Giant Cypress DX (http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/...w/18812/76155/) I rode it at one of the first dealerships, which is where the guy helping me suggested the Raleigh Venture 4.0 instead, saying that it had better components and would be more fun to ride. I like the Cypress (although I vaguely remember liking the trigger gear shifter thing on the Venture a lot better than the grip shifts on the Cypress, which probably had as much to do with me not understanding exactly how they worked as anything- I've improved with my weeks of test riding...)

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    I'm 5'7". At that height, I would avoid womens because they flex a lot, men's are more sturdy. The Cypress looks like it would flex a lot. More energy is expended flexing the bike that could be better directed at easy peddling. It's gets worse the larger (and often heavier) the person is. I need sturdy frames to increase power transer, thereby decreasing effort. You might want to avoid step-through frames. So, perhaps look at the mens models?
    Last edited by Muirenn; 07-23-2014 at 07:14 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    18
    Easy peddling is a priority for me. If a men's bike will make it easier, I can definitely look that direction. I rode a men's Giant bike (can't remember the model) yesterday and it was pretty comfortable. I just keep coming back to how comfy I was on the Venture bikes. But it could be as simple as switching out the seat for a girls version that fits better, too.

    Did I mention I hate making decisions?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    257
    Can you borrow a bike from a friend instead of buying? It sounds like you want to use it for 4 months, then upgrade to a different bike after delivery. I wouldn't put much money into a bike for that short of a time frame. Go cheap and put the money you save into the post-baby bike.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Rowland Hts, CA
    Posts
    473
    Quote Originally Posted by roo4 View Post
    Can you borrow a bike from a friend instead of buying? It sounds like you want to use it for 4 months, then upgrade to a different bike after delivery. I wouldn't put much money into a bike for that short of a time frame. Go cheap and put the money you save into the post-baby bike.
    I completely agree with roo4. I don't think it is worth money to buy a bike for 4 months only.
    2014 Liv Lust
    2013 Specialized Fate Expert with carbon wheelset (sold)
    2012 Specialized Amira Elite
    2010 Santa Cruz Juliana with R kit and Crampon pedals (sold)

    2011 Specialized Ariel Sport,suspension post,Serfas Rx Women's Microfiber saddle (sold)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    18
    Borrowing would be awesome, but I have no friends who bike. I'm in a super small town and rural area, which is awesome for riding around on roads, but not so great for finding friends who want to do what I want to do. I can see that I might like to still have the bike after the baby so I can take it camping with the kids and ride back and forth to grandma's house (which is gravel part way.) My husband thinks he would like a comfort/ cruiser style bike for the same thing.

    I just can't figure out a way to get one bike that does everything I want. That's why I was thinking maybe a two bike system would be nice.


    Although honestly, I am looking again at the Trek FX 7.2 and wondering if I might not just want that bike...
    Last edited by merrysmom; 07-23-2014 at 09:02 AM.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •