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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Dayton, OH
    Posts
    69

    Jett, Lithia, Ruby Comparison?

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    I am pretty sure I am in need of a more T-shaped saddle than the pear shapes I have been trying out. I get sore toward the inside of my sit bones. I measured a few different ways and keep coming up right around 127mm center-to-center. (More than the pear shape, could it be that I'm just going too wide on saddles? Yesterday I picked up a Selle Italia Diva that is 152mm wide. Still feeling the inside soreness after just a mile on this one.)

    I want to try a T-shaped saddle, but can't really find a place that compares the Specialized Jett, Lithia, and Ruby. I'm *guessing* it's mostly a padding difference? I'm going to stop by my local dealer on my way in to work, so maybe I can lay hands on one, hopefully two, but I won't hold my breath.

    Anyone know off the top of their head about these saddles?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    For the Diva, a lot of people have problems with the inside edges of their sit-bones falling into the cutout in the rear. This causes pain in that region. (Me included).

    The 3 saddles you mentioned are not identical in overall shape, but they are close. I use the Ruby, or men's version--the Toupe. (Used a Ruby for over a year, when it wore out, switched to a Toupe. No difference. That particular Ruby was from a few years ago, and was used when I got it). The Toupe is essentially the same, but easier to find. Plus, Specialized has many versions of the Toupe, including the expert, which is more padded than the higher end, more expensive versions, but not nearly as padded as the Jett. The Ruby has more padding than the higher end Toupes, may be about the same as the Toupe Expert series. But, the Exert costs less, because it is not the highest men's Toupe. Nice, hugh?

    Lithia is quite padded. Not sure I'd want to use it on a road bike, but some people do.

    Depending on your outside measurement, I'd try either a 143 or 155. In fact, I'd honestly look at the Toupe Expert before the Ruby, very similar overall, but the Toupe Expert costs less. I have it on my cyclocross road bike, which is a little more upright than my regular road bike. Also like slightly more padding to go over obstacles, this is still a minimally padded saddle, though. If you order direct from Specialized, you can send back within 30 days.

    Toupe Plus Expert $100.00 (middle amount of padding in this group of 3).

    Toupe Comp $75.00 Actually, this is the one on my Cross bike. Not very padded, but more than other Toupes I've tried. Probably has the most padding of these 3

    Toupe Comp Gel. $75.00 Again, essentially the same as the above. Padding thickness may be slightly less. Than the other two. It looks more minimal in that area, plus, it has cro-mo rails (compared to titanium on the 100 dollar model, but weighs only a few grams more, whereas, the other 75 dollar model has cro-mo rails (heavier), and weighs about 20 grams more, that is how I'm judging. 100 dollar model probably is in the middle padding-wise


    Women's Ruby. Essentially the same as the two above that were $75.00, but it goes for $130.00 This Ruby looks different than the one I had. My Ruby looked the same as the Toupes. It's possible this Ruby is less T-shaped than the Toupes, but I'm not sure. They do change, from year to year. Seems like when they changed it, people on TE mentioned it was less T-shaped than before.

    I haven't used the Jett, but it may be quite similar to the men's Avatar. Haven't used the Lithia, either. I imagine a saddle with less padding will chafe less, but that is more dependent on overall shape. Still, shape being equal, for me, more padding tends to chafe and compress into soft tissue.

    If Specialized doesn't work, you may look into the Bontrager Affinity saddles.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 08-10-2013 at 07:56 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    I've ridden a Jett and a Lithia, never a Ruby. The main difference is the padding. But I *did* sit differently on the two saddles, just because of the level of padding. So when I switched from the Lithia to the Jett, I had to make some minor fit tweaks.

    Neither one was T-shaped enough for me in the 155 mm width, in a road position. The Jett is great in an upright position on my hybrid. I'm happy on my SI Turbomatic now.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    I tried a Turbomatic, and even though my sitbone center to center should have technically made this saddle workable, my bones landed on the rear seams behind the cutout. Very painful. I also think the domed shape made it a tad narrow. There are only 2 women on this forum that I know of who use it. A lot tried a year ago or so, but tends to work better for guys. (That's not to say it won't work. But odds are...).
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    240
    I just bought a Lithia Gel today, mainly for the width (168) and just put it on my road bike. I only took a quick spin around the block, but it felt ok so far. I am switching from a Terry Butterfly, which, after riding it for 2 years, i think is too narrow. The Lithia is quite padded, but so is the Terry Bfly, which is why I decided to try this one before the Oura (which is what the sales guy recommended).

    I've tried the Jett and did not like, but everyone is different

    Muirenn, do you ride on a 168mm saddle? I thought there was someone on the forum that did, but can't remember if it was you. I was just going to ask for suggestions in that wider width. (sorry, don't mean to hijack OP's tread)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    No, I'm on a 155. The Oura and Lithia are completely different, though. Why did he recommend it? It's more for the drops, and climbing. I would try the Ruby/Toupe before the Oura. (One of the more padded versions of the Toupe, actually). Unless you need to go in the drops a lot. Even then, going straight to that saddle from a Terry might be difficult. (No idea what kind of riding you do).
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    240
    I ride in a pretty relaxed position, rarely in the drops. Core strength is pretty weak, and I have not been riding a lot this year.

    I think he showed me the Oura, because there weren't too many 168's in stock. I was really hesitant because it was so different from the Terry. I really went in looking for a Lithia but there weren't any 168's on the main display rack, so i was going to give the Oura a try, but my inner voice was telling me it would not work, lol. I was wandering around the store and found a Lithia 168 in a smaller saddle display rack.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    240
    Doesn't look like the Ruby's/ Toupes come in 168mm except for the Ruby Pro, which I don't think would be right for me either.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,466
    Good choice to listen to yourself.

    Even the Romin, the mens version of the Oura, is now available in 168's. Weird! I think the reason is that you have to size up in this saddle, unless you are leaning all the way forward. Really not a good upright saddle. You could check out all the saddles on Specialized website, not just the women's. Look for the correct size. I think they are more unisex than most brands.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    240
    Yes, I made a list last night of the possible 168's from Specialized Romin EVO Comp Gel was on there, thought I didn't realize it was the equivelant of the Oura. I don't think he had the Romin in 168 though.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    240
    And interesting that you mention you have to size up in the Oura/Romin. The 168 Oura looked small to me! But it also appeared kind of domed? I dunno...it just didn't look right to me at all, lol.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Turbomatic ... tends to work better for guys.
    Interesting - I didn't know that. I think a lot of the reason it does work for me, besides the pronounced T-shape, is the doming, that makes the cut-out effectively much more generous than it appears in a photo. Maybe it works better for guys and old freakin' ladies, both of whom have a whole lot of loose soft tissue down there.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Dayton, OH
    Posts
    69
    Thanks for all the info! Picked up a Toupe Expert, but it was $130!! I feel like I got taken on that one. Will try it out tonight.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,847
    Do you definitely need a saddle with a cutout? I tried a Lithia once and it was very painful, for the reason Muirenn cited. My sit bones were on the edge of the cutout.

    T-shaped saddles without cutouts include the Selle San Marco Aspide Glamour and the Bontrager Affiity WSD. The Aspide Glamour is 155 mm wide and very firm. I found it uncomfortable because I needed more padding. I'm currently using a Bontrager Affinity WSD RXL saddle, which is not perfect but is very good for me. The Affinity comes in three widths and three levels of padding -- R (most padded), RL (mid-level padding) and RXL (least padded but still not as firm as the Aspide Glamour). I tried all three versions and liked the RXL best -- the others had too much padding in the nose for me, which caused some problems with numbness. However I offered both the R and RL to a friend and she preferred the R, so it may not be too padded for some people. Bontrager offers a 30-day comfort guarantee. One note about the RXL - due to the shape of the rails, you may need a different seatpost clamp, but that can be easily obtained from either Bontrager or any LBS that sells their products, and it would also be returnable if you try the saddle and decide you don't like it.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Dayton, OH
    Posts
    69
    I don't think I need a cutout, no. I originally thought it would just be better in case I did. I know that's not true for everyone. Years ago I had a Terry Liberator with a cutout and it seemed to be okay, but I guess my body has changed with time. Ha! Thanks for the suggestions!

 

 

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