Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,982

    removing a bike lane

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    This is actually quite damaging for long term efforts in advocating and planning for bike lanes in a city that still has lots of resistant folks to any form of better cycling infrastructure.

    After our city installed a bike lane in the north end, less than a year later the city removed it....after a citizen petition,etc. Ridiculous when the local community originally wanted it!!

    Same for Toronto where a well used bike lane in downtown core was removed after it was there for a few years. Because of a decree by its buffoonish mayor who has done other strange, more foolish things there...

    Yes, well there are the die-hards who think that more people will want to cycle by simply having wider road lanes shared with cars. Yea, sure. That hasn't happened en masse in North America so we have to try other tactics.
    Last edited by shootingstar; 11-17-2012 at 07:07 AM.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    262
    I feel your pain. Where I live, bike lanes, along THE SAME ROAD will appear and disappear depending on the width of the road. So you may travel along a road for a few miles with a nice bike lane and then suddenly at the other side of an intersection, it's gone. Ten blocks later and it's there again. How can you call that "bike friendly"?? Different issue, but the core problem remains the same as what you are talking about. I have lived in Europe a few times in my adult life and do not see these issues, as cycling is part of everyday life. I think until that occurs in North America, we're going to continue to be frustrated as cyclists, especially those that commute in urban areas. Cycling is still not the norm. Sadly, it may never be.
    The bicycle has done more for the emancipation of women than anything else in the world. ~ Susan B. Anthony

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    On my bike
    Posts
    99
    In my area the bike lanes do not allow enough room to stay out of the door zone, usually have debris in them, and if the motorist on your left is turning right you may get hit. I think I would prefer sharrows indicating the cars and bikes are to share the lane.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,391
    I'm another who is not necessarily enamored with bike lanes. I often find them to be more dangerous and less preferable to using the normal lane for all of the reasons Megustalaplay states. They give the illusion of safety to newbies and may well encourage some people to ride.... but in the long run I don't know that they are a good thing, because they also encourage bad habits in both cyclists and drivers.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    What they said. Roads do need to be wide enough to allow safe passing of much slower road users (wheeled, motorized or not). Adding one teeny half-lane instead of widening the existing lanes causes more problems than it solves.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,556
    I do prefer to have sharrows on the pavement, though. I don't know if there are any studies on it, but I always feel like motorists are more respectful when they are there (and at least there's a reminder at regular intervals for cars to behave - whether they obey them or not).
    Most days in life don't stand out, But life's about those days that will...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    942
    I too prefer sharrows to bike lanes (at least the ones we have). But I worry that they can plant the thought in some drivers minds that only where there are sharrows should they expect to be sharing the lane with bikes, instead of almost all the time...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,982
    I respectfully disagree: I already live in a city (over 1 million) with many of streets that have wider car lanes and terrain that is flatter than ie. Vancouver. It definitely has not encouraged more cyclists to use such roads.

    And parents here in our sprawling prairie city, do not want to cycle with their children on such roads.

    For cycllng commuters into downtown since that's where I cycle daily, it is still very noticeable to me even in spring to fall, the majority cyclists commuting to work that I see are....men, not women. Over and over. And these are cyclists who use part of the route ...on a major bike path because that's where I am. Don't tell me that being in a 4 lane one way downtown street is safer during rush hr. It's not a good feeling. We have lots of such streets flowing one way to give cars the advantage of speed and efficiency.

    Have any of you biked in separated bike lanes? Lane that may have a concrete barrier on the road or a whole strip of boulevard planters? ...So far, conversation leads me to believe alot of people here don't live in cities with separated bike lanes? Or some of us just aren't mothers with children on bikes. (I'm not one but have cycled with nieces and nephews over time.)


    Now with cell phone use (despite laws in some jursidictions, such as mine) by drivers, I would say it's now even more dangerous. Compared to several decades ago.
    Last edited by shootingstar; 11-17-2012 at 04:33 PM.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    I rode a lot in Columbus when it had separated bike lanes. It's EXTREMELY dangerous. Everyone, without exception, was glad when they took them out. I thought you were just talking about paint markings. Separated bike lanes are a recipe for intersection collisions. Plus, since street sweepers can't even get into them, they fill up immediately with debris and broken glass and can't be cleaned except by hand, which obviously no one does.

    As far as children ... I agree that there's a need for more places for children to ride, but that's not on the roads, period, end of story. We don't allow children to ride motorcycles on the road. Maybe we need more trails for kids to ride their dirt bikes, maybe we need more parks for kids to ride bicycles, but children just don't need to be piloting vehicles on the road.
    Last edited by OakLeaf; 11-17-2012 at 04:34 PM.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,982
    I guess different jurisdictions have different problems. It may well be that Vancouver has less snow and hence, less gravel, sand piles around that its separated bike lanes don't have that problem.

    Oak, in Vancouver we live within l km. radius of 3 major on road separated bike lanes that run into the downtown core and do connect to some other painted bike lanes.

    Just because 1 city/area had 1 bad experience doesn't mean it's applicable to all areas of North America.

    Calgary does have enough snow where gravel, sand gather on the sides in bike lanes. Then the city does sweep it...later in spring. It has strong policy that it carries through to clear significant km. of its interconnected bike pathway systems during winter whenever there is a snowfall. I live near one of the major arteries, so I know. I will credit the municipality for this work.
    Last edited by shootingstar; 11-17-2012 at 04:43 PM.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Well, I give a lot of credit to places that have special machines narrow enough to sweep separated bike lanes, but I've never seen one. And I doubt that any place, in any country, that doesn't have that kind of machines now, is going to get them in this economy.

    But debris removal is only half of the equation, and the smaller half, IMO. There's no way to avoid intersection conflicts when there are separated lanes, and guess who always loses when there's an intersection conflict.

    I may only have been in my 20s at the time, I was old enough to be aware of all the long-time cycling advocates in Columbus's highly developed cycling community, advocating for the lane separators to be removed.
    Last edited by OakLeaf; 11-17-2012 at 05:19 PM.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Longmont, Colorado
    Posts
    23
    I'm extremely happy to have a Greenway multi-use path in my new home town, but I was confused as to why you couldn't access it from the bike lane. You have to know to get on the sidewalk early, stop and lift your bike over the curb, or simply ride on the sidewalk all the time. I prefer the bike lane, because people just don't check the sidewalk at intersections, often they do funny turns at roadways instead of continuing in a logical path, and in my old town they were littered with glass and had annoying dips constantly at driveways as well as mailboxes cemented into the middle of the concrete. Here the sidewalks are better, but I still prefer the predictable bike lane.

    I've never had a separated bike lane. I did enjoy the very wide roads in the town I moved from- I felt very safe and cars were almost always courteous and passed safely.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    41
    I understand your frustration with having the bike lanes removed, but I think they are the wrong approach. Why don't drivers' tests have questions that address the rights of cyclists on the road? I see plenty of ads on TV and billboards telling drivers to keep an eye open for motorcycles. We should have the same thing for bicycles. They could address the misconception that we should be riding on the shoulders, when the shoulders are so much more dangerous than the road.
    I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel...the picture of free, untrammelled womanhood--Susan B. Anthony

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    I'm willing to be open minded about the concept that bike lanes could work in some places ... but I'm (1) curious about the execution and (2) also afraid that those places might be used as examples by planners in other places where they would clearly be dangerous - as you're informally doing.

    So enlighten me on the two most common issues.

    (1) Proceeding straight through an intersection. How are the bike lane separators designed so that cyclists are clearly visible to vehicles that are turning right from the cyclists' left? How do vehicles intending to turn right from the cross street, onto the street where the cyclist is, pull up so that they can see the traffic running parallel to the bike lane, without interfering with the cyclists' ability to go straight?

    (2) Turning left. How, when and where does the cyclist exit the separator and weave their way over to the left traffic lane?
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    4,391
    A while back someone posted an example of how intersections would be handled with separated cycle tracks. Crosswalks were moved back and a ring of green zones were painted in front of them. There was a gap in the curbing at each crooks walk/ geen zone, but the corner itself was curbed. Cyclists were expected to travel around the long way - in essence creating a traffic circle, but just for the bikes.

    I prsonally thought it looked a bit nightmarish, as I view every intersection as a potential left/right hook and with that scenario the number of intersections is tripled......
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •