Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    127

    Best commuting jackets for winter?

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    I have a new job downtown and am going to be biking 2 miles to the subway -- hopefully throughout the winter! I'm looking for something...

    1) Warm enough to keep me comfortable biking 2 miles in 20-degree temps
    2) Short enough that I don't get tangled getting on/off bike and on/off seat
    3) Attractive enough for me to look professional at work

    I've looked at the jackets on the Terry site, but nothing quite fits the bill. What jacket do you like for winter bike commuting?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,446
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    2,051
    I use layers. Part of the challenge for me is not sweating. It's easiest if I don't have to change clothes when I get to work, but I haven't found a great solution, so in the extreme temps (extremely cold & extremely hot), I end up wearing different clothes for my short commute and changing when I get to work.

    When the temps are in the 20's (F), I wear a merino wool undershirt, a light windbreaker, and my goretex rain coat (Phantom). The wind breaker & rain coat are cycling specific so they are the right shape. They don't get tangled, and they don't leave a cold bare gap on my back when I'm leaning over the handlebar. However, a non-cycling specific light jacket & outer shell to block the wind would probably do fine.

    It seems like not much clothes but it is enough for me at that temp. The balaclava, gloves, wool socks, and long johns or leggings under my jeans or slacks complete the rest of it. And a thick layer of vaseline on the part of my face that isn't covered by the balaclava.

    I'm not sure what you mean about the jacket being work-professional. I take my jackets off when I get to work. The one thing that does cause me problems is if I need to go over to the other building on a cold day. What works for biking in the cold isn't nearly warm enough to walk 3 blocks. Sometimes I just sprint. However I have enough coats that I should probably just leave one in the office.
    2009 Trek 7.2FX WSD, brooks Champion Flyer S, commuter bike

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,192
    My commute involves walking down the stairs but my DD commutes in Portland and I just bought her an O2 Calhoun Jacket - this is a rain jacket but it has the pit zips so hopefully will be breathing better than the mountain hardware she uses now. Nice long back to cover the "tail" although she also has fenders. It is a nice bright yellow - Be seen. She layers underneath the jacket as needed

    A positive of the 2 mile to the subway. you may be able to ride without getting to hot and sweaty and you have time on the train to regroup

    I think leaving another jacket at work is the perfect answer for off the bike needs.
    Sky King
    ____________________
    Gilles Berthoud "Bernard"
    Surly ECR "Eazi"
    Empowering the Bicycle Traveler
    biketouringnews.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Between the Blue Ridge and the Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    5,226
    Honestly, for a two-mile commute, you might as well just ride your bike in your regular clothes and regular jacket/coat. That's what upright Dutch-type bikes are so good for.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    2,051
    Quote Originally Posted by tulip View Post
    Honestly, for a two-mile commute, you might as well just ride your bike in your regular clothes and regular jacket/coat. That's what upright Dutch-type bikes are so good for.
    It depends on what the hills are like in her area. Even for a short commuter a serious hill can either work up too much sweat for the regular jacket/coat, or if it's a downhill the regular jacket & coat might not be up to it. Well, even my fairly flat 2 mile commuter before we moved, at 20F temps, I preferred to have my cycling specific clothes. The gaps (wrist waist, ankles) that regular clothes invariably leave are just awful at that temp.
    2009 Trek 7.2FX WSD, brooks Champion Flyer S, commuter bike

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,981
    If one lives in an area with snowy slush, etc., then I would tend not to cycle in my office clothing. I just can't afford time and more money to wear out my office clothing vs. cycling clothing (which tends to be sturdier materials anyway).

    Best cycle commuting jacket for me: high visbility colours so that I can cycle safely in the dark, pit/underarm zippers if I need it, a jacket that's thick enough for days when the temperature drops well below freezing, plus a jacket that does not have back air vent. Those jackets are just too cold for me in the winter. (Fine in spring summer.)
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,135
    I'm about the layers, too. I just put on two jackets.
    If it's *seriously* cold (which is going to be a different temp for different people) I get on the trainer for six minutes before going out. Then I don't even have that "cold before you get warm" thing, tho' if you're at the subway in 10-15 minutes you're not going to get *that* cold.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    2,051
    Quote Originally Posted by Geonz View Post
    I'm about the layers, too. I just put on two jackets.
    If it's *seriously* cold (which is going to be a different temp for different people) I get on the trainer for six minutes before going out. Then I don't even have that "cold before you get warm" thing, tho' if you're at the subway in 10-15 minutes you're not going to get *that* cold.
    I do jumping jacks. But for 20-30F, that's not usually necessary. That's for <20F, for me.
    2009 Trek 7.2FX WSD, brooks Champion Flyer S, commuter bike

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,135
    Used to be that for me... but it's snuck down to 10... tho' last winter wasn't that cold for that long so it might have snuck back up. However, the bike I had on the trainer is the one that got spirited away...

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1
    I'd look for a softshell jacket as they tend to look a little better off the bike and will keep you warmer (don't really need to worry much about overdressing on short commutes!). If being cold is an issue, start from your core and invest in some good baselayers!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    lost in my own thoughts
    Posts
    302
    North Face softshell jacket Men's Cut as it's longer and covers more, in my opinion. Chrome Stock Cobra underneath. Balaclava. Good gloves. I have a pair of thick Craft brand gloves that are amazing. Adidas Samba soccer shoes (stiff indoor soccer insole makes them nice for short bike rides). Then whatever else you're wearing.

    Just a regular softshell style jacket (many generic brands are available. Or, I used to ride in my old M65 Army surplus Field Jacket before I got all snooty. LOL!) Those work well because they are like wind-repellant and water repellant with an insulating layer inside.
    "Things look different from the seat of a bike carrying a sleeping bag with a cold beer tucked inside." ~Jim Malusa
    2009 Trek 520-Brooks B-17 Special in Antique Brown
    2010 Surly Long Haul Trucker-Brooks B-17 Standard in Black
    1983 Fuji Espree Single Speed-Brooks B17 British Racing Green

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    2,024
    I have a different problem. Where I live its chilly on the ride in, 40s, but warm on the ride home (60s-70s). So I started using the cannondale morpheus jacket. What I like about it is that the sleeves come off with magnets for the commute home, and it is screaming yellow which is good for visibility and its waterproof too. But its just a shell, although you could layer it over an ibex sweater in a colder climate.
    Last edited by Triskeliongirl; 02-28-2013 at 10:20 AM.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •