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  1. #1
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    Question spin class conversion to mph?

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    if you were logging miles for your spin class, how many miles would you estimate for a one hour advanced spin class?

    It's hard to figure what all that high cadence (100-120) plus intermediate cadence (75-90) adds up to. what's the conversion of cadence to mph?
    Cheers!

    Cindy

    Team Luna Chix

  2. #2
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    Personally, I count indoor rides as time not mileage. I'm not going anywhere after all. That's why when you look at my bike journal, you don't see the many hours I've put in with Coach Troy lately.

    However, if I were to count it, I'd go with whatever pace I know I could sustain for an hour on the flat.

    V.
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  3. #3
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    Jul 2003
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    I'm with V. on this one. I only count mileage on my bike on the road. And I log any indoor training in hours.

    Based on other discussions, there do seem to be quite a few folks here who count their "miles" on their indoor trainer though, and I think Veronica's idea for estimating miles is a good one.

    --- Denise
    Last edited by DeniseGoldberg; 01-11-2006 at 04:29 AM.
    www.denisegoldberg.com

    • Click here for links to journals and photo galleries from my travels on two wheels and two feet.
    • Random thoughts and experiences in my blog at denisegoldberg.blogspot.com


    "To truly find yourself you should play hide and seek alone."
    (quote courtesy of an unknown fortune cookie writer)

  4. #4
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    I do log my spin class as mileage. I figure for a tough class with lots of speed work, equates to about 20 miles. Keep in mind there are no stop lights or signs or other road hazards so 20 miles is probably conservative. If there is lots of "hill climbing" then I lower the mileage to around 15 miles. In addition, if I continue to ride after class, which I often do, I lower the mileage 'cause I'm not working as hard. For 2 hours, I usually give myself 35 miles. I figure I can easily do 35 miles in two hours on the road when there are no lights or signs.
    BCIpam - Nature Girl

  5. #5
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    Bar Harbor, Maine
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    I think Veronica's idea for estimating miles for a spin class is sound. I record both hours and estimated distances for spin classes reckon that an hour in a fairly intense spin class for me is about 20-24 miles.
    "It never gets easier, you just go faster." -- Greg LeMond

  6. #6
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    If you really wanted to calculate this, CindySue... you would also have to take into account the gearing you were in... plus cadence... I think it would become quite problematic.

    It is probably best to record it as minutes/hours ridden at 'x' resistence...

    Otherwise, if they don't have some kind of speedo on the bikes in your class, can you just take your speedo along and attach the magnet to your spin bike for the session?


    Courage does not always roar. Sometimes, it is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying,
    "I will try again tomorrow".


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by RoadRaven
    can you just take your speedo along and attach the magnet to your spin bike for the session?[/COLOR]
    guess I could, but it's not that big of a deal. My estimates are in line with the ones above, but I might just follow the lead of those who just log hours and not miles.....

    it's raining today. I should be at the gym at least. Started cleaning out some old books and stuff for charity.....
    Cheers!

    Cindy

    Team Luna Chix

  8. #8
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    We put a speed sensor on my rear wheel today. Forty-six minutes of The Uphill Grind Spinervals DVD and I went 11.5 miles, average of 15 MPH.

    Don't forget to take into account all the rest intervals and warm up and cool down that are in a spin class. During the actual sets I was averaging 17 - 18 mph - with a high of 37.8!

    We put the sensor on to get an idea of my power output. There's a chart on Kurt Kinetic site you can use to convert speed to watts. We wanted to check it in a controlled environment. It's not a perfect match because there is more resistance when you're riding outside.


    Veronica
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    53
    I'm beginning to realize I'm a slug. Do you guys seriously average 20-25 mph when you ride outside for an hour or more? My average is only 13 mph - although that does include riding around town, I still seriously doubt I'm doing much more than 20-25 mph when I ride on a straight, flat piece of road, and I wouldn' t be surprised to find out I sometimes dip to 5 mph going uphill (not that I can look at my cyclocomputer when I'm going uphill - too exhausting!). Yikes. I'm depressed

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by anne_77
    I'm beginning to realize I'm a slug. Do you guys seriously average 20-25 mph when you ride outside for an hour or more? My average is only 13 mph...
    Anne -
    If you're a slug I guess I am too! I also average between 13 and 14 mph. Many years ago I used to beat myself up over my speed and try to change it, but I finally learned that is the speed my body likes. I am more of an endurance rider; in fact I can happily ride at my 13-14mph pace for hours and hours and...

    Feeling good about yourself and your riding is important. I personally do not feel that riding at a slower pace than others is necessarily something that should make you feel bad. If getting faster is something you want to do, I'm sure there are some folks here who can give you some pointers.

    Happy riding at whatever pace is right for you!

    --- Denise
    www.denisegoldberg.com

    • Click here for links to journals and photo galleries from my travels on two wheels and two feet.
    • Random thoughts and experiences in my blog at denisegoldberg.blogspot.com


    "To truly find yourself you should play hide and seek alone."
    (quote courtesy of an unknown fortune cookie writer)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by anne_77
    I'm beginning to realize I'm a slug. Do you guys seriously average 20-25 mph when you ride outside for an hour or more? My average is only 13 mph - although that does include riding around town, I still seriously doubt I'm doing much more than 20-25 mph when I ride on a straight, flat piece of road, and I wouldn' t be surprised to find out I sometimes dip to 5 mph going uphill (not that I can look at my cyclocomputer when I'm going uphill - too exhausting!). Yikes. I'm depressed
    It's fairly easy, with an intense workout - to average 20 - 25 miles per hour even on the road. That does come with experience. Keep working at it. Use "fart lek" (sp?) training. Next time out for a ride, between light poles, ride as hard as you can, all out, then between the next two ride easy rest, and then ride hard again. Do that for 10 minutes for a week. 20 minutes the next etc. You'll be surprised how easy, especially on flat roads, you can ride at 18 - 20 mph without problem. Also keep in mind its easy to average 20 mph in a spin class where there are no stop lights, signs or cars. Road is alittle different.

    Now hills, yes, I still drop down, sometimes to 5 mphs, but I am working on
    that!
    BCIpam - Nature Girl

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcipam
    It's fairly easy, with an intense workout - to average 20 - 25 miles per hour even on the road. ...
    I think you need to calibarate your speedometer or you're talking about averaging these speeds over short distances. Otherwise,maybe you should be competing with the pros since the slowest guy on the 34 mile ITT at the Tour this year averaged 23 MPH. Our national champion, Christine Thorburn won with an average time of 26.4 mph over 15 miles.

    On a flat road with no wind it takes 122 watts of power to go 14 mph. To go to 20 mph it takes 250 watts, not what I would call an easy transistion.

    It can be very demotivating to a new rider when an elite rider says something this difficult, should be easy. Anyone who can perform at this level has obviously worked hard and long to get there.

    Veronica
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  13. #13
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    On a recovery ride, I average about 22-24km/hour (thats 13-14 mph)

    On a training ride I average about 30-31km/hour (thats just under 19 mph)

    During a TT I average about 32-34 km/hour (20-21mph)

    While my recovery rides and training rides will not increase by much, I expect to increase my race speed in a TT by 4km over the next 12-18 months (rembering that the higher the speed, the more power output required for each extra kilometre or mile).

    When I am on my trainer, I try and emulate the resistance and gears to reflect whichever ride I am "imitating".

    We are currently looking at getting a "proper" spin bike for at home, rather than the road bike on a trainer we currently have. If we do that, I would also like to pop a power output metre on it to more accurately read my effort and progress.


    Courage does not always roar. Sometimes, it is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying,
    "I will try again tomorrow".


  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Veronica
    I think you need to calibarate your speedometer or you're talking about averaging these speeds over short distances. Otherwise,maybe you should be competing with the pros since the slowest guy on the 34 mile ITT at the Tour this year averaged 23 MPH. Our national champion, Christine Thorburn won with an average time of 26.4 mph over 15 miles.

    On a flat road with no wind it takes 122 watts of power to go 14 mph. To go to 20 mph it takes 250 watts, not what I would call an easy transistion.

    It can be very demotivating to a new rider when an elite rider says something this difficult, should be easy. Anyone who can perform at this level has obviously worked hard and long to get there.

    Veronica
    Keep in mind there are distinct differences with road and spin riding. I can, on a flat road, with little wind resistance, average 20 mph. I am a strong rider. But if I'm doing a longer ride, something over 30 miles, I slow it down, averaging between 16 - 18 otherwise I would clearly burn out.

    This is where spin class is different. There is a time limit. I can, knowing I'm riding only an hour or so, ride "balls out" and push hard. I normally do not ride with the same intensely on the road that I ride in spin class. I'm usually a dripping wet, sweat ball after spin class. Not so, after a road ride.

    Yes I am an experienced ride and have raced in my past. But I'm hardly elite. I didn't mean it was easy to ride fast. It is, however, if the rider trains properly, devotes time to riding and training and is motivated to ride that fast, not hard to do. I know of fairly new riders who can acheive this level of fitness in a short time. Also big difference between 20 mph and 26. I can get to 20 but 26 is a big effort for me.

    And again we are talking about a spin class which doesn't deal with road friction, gravity, stop lights, traffic, directional changes etc. TT are seldom conducted under those circumstances. There is usually some if not alot of elevation gain, plus directional changes, road friction etc. Also I'm at a high level in spin class. I can usually ride harder than the instructors. I expect a newbie spinner doesn't do 20 mph they may be more like 10. Everyone has to make their own judgments.
    BCIpam - Nature Girl

  15. #15
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    Are you counting warm up, cool down and rest intervals in that hour? I guess you don't do one legged drills either.

    This morning's workout was Spinervals Ultra Core Conditioning. It alternates between one legged drills/ off the bike core work and high cadence spins/ core work. In 66 minutes you're off the bike for about 20 minutes and there is a warm up and cool down period. My speed sensor gives me 9.4 miles for this type of workout.

    V.
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

 

 

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