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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    central Idaho mountains
    Posts
    53

    How to sit the saddle

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    My bike has a big comfortable saddle and my behind is also large
    The body position is fairly upright on the Specialized Crossroads Elite in the avatar. When I'm riding I become aware of sitting more on the butt flesh behind the sit bones than the sit bones themselves and wonder if this is correct. I can sort of rock forward a little to feel the pressure on the bones but don't maintain this position without staying aware.

    What is the best way to sit the saddle on such a bike?
    Shelley, Great Grandma Beginner
    1991 Specialized Hard Rock
    2012 Trek Superfly100 AL Elite

    Occasional blogging at: My Mountain Home

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    74
    On the sit bones.

    That is why it is so important that you have a saddle that is as wide as your sit bones.
    Existence is empty, but I am full of myself.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Columbia, MO
    Posts
    2,051
    I have heard that it's not how big the butt is but how wide the sitbones are that matters. You might actually need a narrower saddle.
    2009 Trek 7.2FX WSD, brooks Champion Flyer S, commuter bike

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,448
    Hmm. If you feel the flesh and not the bones, it could be that the saddle is too squishy, which compresses the muscle (and makes it harder to pedal). Have you measured your sit bones? The saddle should be as wide as your outside distance, but it's easier to get an accurate reading on the center to center measurement, and then add 20-40 mm, depending. (I think the average is around 30-35. This total should give an idea how wide you need. But I think the reason you feel flesh and not bone is that you need a nice, non-padded saddle.

    I suggest a Brooks, to be honest. They are very nice with such an upright bike. If you want a cutout, a B-68 Imperial. If no cutout, a B-68. And if you would like a sprung saddle, perhaps a B-67. Wallbikes has a 6 month guaranteed return policy.

    If you do decide to get one, stay away from the S or short models. Those have short rails, and less room to adjust fore and aft. Plus,you might end up resting too far forward on the saddle's nose, and end up sitting on the metal cantle plate beneath. No part of your bones should be in contact with the metal frame.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 07-19-2012 at 06:04 PM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    central Idaho mountains
    Posts
    53
    I'm looking into those saddle recommendations.

    Today I rode 22 miles and was very proud of myself as it was a first. I'm alternating my rides with paddling my new kayak to sort of balance things out as far as sore arms or sore knees!

    One of the "bike sons" was here and adjusted my handlebars lower so I won't sit so upright. I think that will help with how I sit so I'm going to try that for a few rides and see if it makes a big difference on the saddle.

    As soon as I get that kayak paid off I'll be shopping for a road bike! I'm 5'5" and weigh 190 so I better look for something sturdy. I've lost 14 lbs thus far and am hoping that this combination of biking and kayaking will be the path to better health.
    Shelley, Great Grandma Beginner
    1991 Specialized Hard Rock
    2012 Trek Superfly100 AL Elite

    Occasional blogging at: My Mountain Home

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,083
    Quote Originally Posted by sashadieken View Post
    I'm looking into those saddle recommendations.

    Today I rode 22 miles and was very proud of myself as it was a first. I'm alternating my rides with paddling my new kayak to sort of balance things out as far as sore arms or sore knees!
    That's an excellent idea, kayaking and cycling balance each other very well. I love alternating these. Sometimes I'll cover the same territory on land and in the water, and it's surprising how totally different the experience is.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,448
    Your knees hurt? The saddle position needs to be adjusted. Can you go to a local bike shop and ask them to help you adjust the saddle so your knees don't hurt? A full bike fitting is unusual on that type of bike, but it sounds like you would benefit.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,192
    Boy I hope the lowered handlebar adjustment doesn't create pressure points on the soft tissue. This isn't a road bike and doesn't sound like a road bike saddle. Don't be afraid to raise the bars back up if you get sore.

    If you are soon to be on a new bike does it make sense to invest in changing this bike or do you simply go bike shopping.
    Sky King
    ____________________
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    Surly ECR "Eazi"
    Empowering the Bicycle Traveler
    biketouringnews.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Mrs. KnottedYet
    Posts
    8,975
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Your knees hurt? The saddle position needs to be adjusted. Can you go to a local bike shop and ask them to help you adjust the saddle so your knees don't hurt? A full bike fitting is unusual on that type of bike, but it sounds like you would benefit.
    What we mean by the saddle position is the height. As you pedal when your feet are in the 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock position your lower leg (6 o'clock) should be straight but the knees are not locked. Your knee will have an ever so slight bend.

    This is also with the ball of the foot on the pedals, not the heel of the foot.

    What I see often especially new or returning riders is the seat is too low. This makes you feel more comfortable on starts and stops. And if you need that now that is fine!

    But this lower position increases strain on the knees. It sounds like you are doing more miles now.

    So I'd either take it to a shop and have them asses the fit.
    Custom Road bike ~ Mondonico Futura Legero
    Found on the road ~ Motobecane Mixte
    N+1 new bike ~ Salsa Vaya
    Commuter ~ Soma Buena Vista Mixte

    http://madeinusareviews.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    central Idaho mountains
    Posts
    53
    Yes, I raised the seat height myself about the middle of last week. I did check the leg position and it seems about right. The pain in my knees only lasted a few hours and is completely gone today, even after 2 hours in the kayak.

    I'm found out: yes, I'm a shopper! I love imagining myself on different bikes I feel like a new person with all sorts of possibilities in front of me, although I'd better be realistic at my age (65). It all started with clean eating, which I've been fine tuning over the last year. When I began to feel better and have less general pain it became easier to move around and our daily dog walks became more enjoyable. Then I started with the bike, and now the kayak.

    I can see myself on a mountain bike, which I haven't ridden for the last 10 years at least. I can imagine myself climbing another Oregon volcano, when the last one was about 10 years ago.

    The doctor is encouraging me to go on statins for high cholesterol, but one of the side effects is muscle pain and I can't afford that if I want to continue my activity. I lowered my number by 50 points in the last 3 months so I'm going to hold out for another 3 months and see what I can do!
    Last edited by sashadieken; 08-05-2012 at 08:19 PM. Reason: spelling
    Shelley, Great Grandma Beginner
    1991 Specialized Hard Rock
    2012 Trek Superfly100 AL Elite

    Occasional blogging at: My Mountain Home

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    central Idaho mountains
    Posts
    53
    Trek420 and Muirenn, I thought I'd raised the saddle enough last week but at your suggestions I decided to go higher today. So, adjusting it three times, I went up about an inch and now it feels great and no more sore knees! Thanks!
    Sky King, the lower handlebars felt good and didn't create any soft tissue problems.

    I suppose it's not unusual to start riding and want to try new equipment. I'm still entertaining that road bike idea
    Shelley, Great Grandma Beginner
    1991 Specialized Hard Rock
    2012 Trek Superfly100 AL Elite

    Occasional blogging at: My Mountain Home

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    perpetual traveler
    Posts
    1,302
    Quote Originally Posted by Trek420 View Post
    . . . take it to a shop and have them asses the fit.
    Sorry Trek, but this was funny!

    (Your advice was spot on).
    Trek Madone 4.7 WSD
    Cannondale Quick4
    1969 Schwinn Collegiate, original owner
    Terry Classic


    Richard Feynman: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.”

 

 

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