Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 28
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    355

    visited the LBS today: bike is too small :(

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    I took my bike into the shop today for a tune-up and discussed bike fit with them. I can't seem to get the adjustment right. My butt starts killing me around mile 5 and one of my knees by mile 7.

    Come to find out, she measured the crankshaft and says my bike is too short for me. I bought it like new but used and the lady was about an inch shorter than me.

    She said the crank is 14.5 and she would suggest 16 for me. I know nothing about this but have been reading bike fit articles for a bit. They seem to discuss the height of the frame more than the crankshaft.

    I also found out that they sell used bikes there. I am thinking about buying a road bike with the drops and gifting my current bike to a girl I mentor. Shes a preteen and about three or four inches shorter than I am.

    One good thing about the LBS, I found a jersey there I think I might buy. It's on sale for 60$ and has the xxl ladies size. It even has a zip pocket on the rear along with the other pockets.

    A little disapointed in the bike fit issue.
    2013: Riding a Dolce sport compact for fun and a vintage Jetter with cargo rack for commuting

    www.bike-sby.org: A network of concerned cyclists working to make our city more bicycle friendly.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Lakewood, Co
    Posts
    1,068
    I'm confused. You said she measured the crank and said the bike is too short. Is the frame too short or are the cranks too short?

    The crank is only 1 thing a fitter will look at and it can be changed to a longer one, but what about the size of the frame? How does it fit? If there are major fit issues then definitely you'll want to see a good fitter and get a new bike. If the frame fits with minor adjustments then switching the crank is not a big deal.

    How much will it cost to fit the bike vs buying a new one?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    perpetual traveler
    Posts
    1,302
    The measurements you are giving do not sound like crank size measurement but frame measurements.
    Trek Madone 4.7 WSD
    Cannondale Quick4
    1969 Schwinn Collegiate, original owner
    Terry Classic


    Richard Feynman: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.”

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,375
    Quote Originally Posted by goldfinch View Post
    The measurements you are giving do not sound like crank size measurement but frame measurements.
    Yes, crank measurements are mm - ie 170 mm. They generally run 165, 170, 175 for DF bikes. It's extremely rare to hear about 145s, so I can't imagine that's what she meant.
    I'm thinking frame size.
    The height of the previous owner may have as much/more to do with leg and or torso length. (My SO rides a smaller bike than me, but he's 1" taller - he's all torso and I'm all leg).
    My photoblog
    http://dragons-fly-peacefully.blogspot.com/
    Bacchetta Giro (recumbent commuter)
    Bacchetta Corsa (recumbent "fast" bike)
    Greespeed X3 (recumbent "just for fun" trike)
    Strada Velomobile
    I will never buy another bike!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    True, but the OP is complaining of butt and knees, which doesn't sound like a frame fit issue. Knee pain could very well be crank length. Butt is likely to be either saddle or conditioning. But frame size issues usually manifest in the upper body...
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    355
    When pick up my bike, I'll get them to clarify. I might just deal with it instead of refitting it, depends on the costs. I really want a road bike. I'll have to drive to the next town to see a second LBS.

    When I get it back I'll measure the frame.

    Ps I think both are too short.I'm 5'6.5 with a short waist. I think my inseam is longer than usual for my height-33" last time I checked.
    Last edited by lovelygamer; 06-10-2012 at 05:42 AM.
    2013: Riding a Dolce sport compact for fun and a vintage Jetter with cargo rack for commuting

    www.bike-sby.org: A network of concerned cyclists working to make our city more bicycle friendly.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    216
    14.5 (I'm presuming centimeter) cranks are pretty short and would likely only be found on a child's bike or recumbent unless the person had some physical restrictions. I'm 5' tall with a 25" inseam and have flexibility issues and I ride with cranks this short.
    Bike Friday Petite Crusoe
    Terry Trixie
    Gary Fisher beater bike

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    perpetual traveler
    Posts
    1,302
    Quote Originally Posted by Sylvia View Post
    14.5 (I'm presuming centimeter) cranks are pretty short and would likely only be found on a child's bike or recumbent unless the person had some physical restrictions. I'm 5' tall with a 25" inseam and have flexibility issues and I ride with cranks this short.
    Unlikely that a budget hybrid would have 145 cranks.
    Trek Madone 4.7 WSD
    Cannondale Quick4
    1969 Schwinn Collegiate, original owner
    Terry Classic


    Richard Feynman: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.”

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    California
    Posts
    216
    Quote Originally Posted by goldfinch View Post
    Unlikely that a budget hybrid would have 145 cranks.
    For a full size hybrid, I agree, although the previous owner could have added them, if for example, a junior cyclist were using this bike. 145mm crank arms in 74/130BCD triples can be found fairly inexpensively.
    Bike Friday Petite Crusoe
    Terry Trixie
    Gary Fisher beater bike

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    perpetual traveler
    Posts
    1,302
    Quote Originally Posted by Sylvia View Post
    For a full size hybrid, I agree, although the previous owner could have added them, if for example, a junior cyclist were using this bike. 145mm crank arms in 74/130BCD triples can be found fairly inexpensively.

    Sure, it just seems odd given the kind of bike it is.

    Either way, it will be interesting to hear the skinny from the bike shop.
    Trek Madone 4.7 WSD
    Cannondale Quick4
    1969 Schwinn Collegiate, original owner
    Terry Classic


    Richard Feynman: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.”

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    355
    I"m kind of hoping when I pick it back up the other owner is there. Truthfully, I didn't much care for the lady that checked us in. I have lots of questions. I asked for a fit-and she pretty much blew me off. I'm going to ask again when I pick it up. Being that the bike is too short, the handlebars need to be raised and I don't do well at mechanical stuff. I can raise the seat.

    Why do the LBS's seem to be so hard to deal with? As a new customer, they should be happy to be making my money. I think they probably already make tons being as they are the only shop in town.

    Hoping to hear from them today.
    2013: Riding a Dolce sport compact for fun and a vintage Jetter with cargo rack for commuting

    www.bike-sby.org: A network of concerned cyclists working to make our city more bicycle friendly.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,132
    You didn't buy the bike you're currently riding at that shop, right? Well, that might explain part of her irritation. A lot of shops do offer formal fittings--regardless of where you bought the bike--for a fee. Otherwise, most shops only offer a gratuitous fittings for bikes purchased at that shop. That doesn't mean you can't ask this LBS for help with fit, but you might not get the warmest reception.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Mrs. KnottedYet
    Posts
    8,983
    Ask if someone there is certified/trained to do a fit. Not all shop owners or employees are certified and if they are not it may not be worth any price. Find a certified fitter nearby.

    I was ready to throw my first road bike into the bay. I took it to my LBS which was not where I bought it. He saw the bars were to wide for me. $30-35 later for new Dedo women specific bars and it felt like a new bike. That wasn't even a fit. He just saw me ride in.

    The right LBS or LBS employee can do a lot with very little.

    Quote Originally Posted by lovelygamer View Post
    Why do the LBS's seem to be so hard to deal with? As a new customer, they should be happy to be making my money. I think they probably already make tons being as they are the only shop in town.
    Sadly there's not a lot of money in the cycling industry. Some shops do very well such as my favorite Bay Area shop. But I think that has more to do with his capturing a high end bike market and good solid business practices such as a low inventory. It's a tiny space and he does not keep much on hand. Yet they can get anything you want or need quickly or that he needs to complete the job.

    Most shops have a lot of bikes and inventory on the floor and yet do not get a lot of money back. They also have to compete with everything from online deals, box stores to Craigs and eBay. I don't think owners go into this industry for the money. It's more about the love of cycling and cyclists.

    Cycling is a very customer service focused sport. As you can see if a bike and even parts of it are not fit to the rider you can hardly suffer through a few miles. I think this is why we must support our LBS, work with them and buy from them when we can. Without good LBS service it's not much fun.
    Last edited by Trek420; 06-11-2012 at 07:29 AM.
    Custom Road bike ~ Mondonico Futura Legero
    Found on the road ~ Motobecane Mixte
    N+1 new bike ~ Salsa Vaya
    Commuter ~ Soma Buena Vista Mixte

    http://madeinusareviews.blogspot.com/

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Lakewood, Co
    Posts
    1,068
    A fitting (not sizing) will cost in the neighborhood of $100-$250. Some shops charge for everything they do. One shop here charges $80 for cleat alignment.

    The cost of going to a fit school for training is not inexpensive. The shop, or fitter has to recoup their expenses so they will not offer the service to everyone who walks in the door, especially if the bike was not bought from their shop.

    My fitter will make changes on my Serotta for free, I bought the bike from him, but charges me a nominal fee to work on the bikes that I didn't buy from him.

    Many shops will include a fitting if you buy a bike from them that is over a certain price range.

    Shops often will make saddle adjustments, etc. but that is not a fitting.

    Here's tons of information from the Master bike fitters Association http://masterbikefitters.com/how-to-buy-a-new-bike
    Last edited by Kathi; 06-11-2012 at 07:25 AM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    355
    Thanks Ladies. I did buy the bike from a private user but I would have happily paid for the fitting service. The are charging 40$ for a tune-up which I don't feel is too much.

    I'm not going to judge them after one visit. I know there are many factors that go into everything. Maybe they were exceptionally busy. I do recall seeing three college kids in the rear, turning wrenches.

    I think I am just going to raise the handlebar and seat until I can figure something else out. I will speak to them about proper measurements for a road bike, in case the right one comes along.
    2013: Riding a Dolce sport compact for fun and a vintage Jetter with cargo rack for commuting

    www.bike-sby.org: A network of concerned cyclists working to make our city more bicycle friendly.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •