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Thread: Creatin.

  1. #1
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    Creatin.

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    Anyone take creatin? What's the feedback on this? I'm trying to get faster on the long, flat stretches because these are much harder for me than hill work. I just LOVE the hills because I'm good at them. But I want to be a good all-rounder. Any tips?
    Cheers girls, Yas.

  2. #2
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    I used it for a couple of years when I was weight lifing heavily (no pun intended ). It allowed me to recover quicker and work out longer, the "side-effect" was that I got HUGE muscles, it transports more fluid into the cells so you bulk a bit, as soon as the training intensity drops the bulk diminishes.

    Electra Townie 7D

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Queen
    I used it for a couple of years when I was weight lifing heavily (no pun intended ). It allowed me to recover quicker and work out longer, the "side-effect" was that I got HUGE muscles, it transports more fluid into the cells so you bulk a bit, as soon as the training intensity drops the bulk diminishes.
    Thanks for that. I'm hoping to bulk up a bit in the quads so I can push the long, flat stretches harder. So, in theory, if I take creatin & keep working these muscles (& drink lots of fluid) I should bulk here. I'll try it.

  4. #4
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    Let me start by saying I'm not a big fan of supplements(except standard multi-vitamins and calcium). We typically don't understand the long term impact of loading up on specific amino acids, minerals, etc. Most times the supposed benefits of taking supplements (by healthy individuals) are not subjected to rigorous scientific assessment.

    That said, there is a very nice treatment of Creatine at the following web site:

    http://www.sportsci.org/traintech/creatine/rbk.html

    The conclusion is that creatine may benefit performance and is probably pretty safe. What I really like about the site above is that they provide specific references for the claims/effects.

    -traveller
    "It never gets easier, you just go faster." -- Greg LeMond

  5. #5
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    What is Creatine/Creatin...



    Creatine occurs naturally in meat (including fish) and milk (I think maybe in eggs too?).

    In humans, over 95% of the total creatine is located in skeletal muscle.

    Creatine is biosynthesized in liver, kidney and pancreas... the daily use of creatine for a 70kg person is about 2g. It plays an important role in the regulation and balance of skeletal muscle energy metabolism and is essential in the provision and transfer of energy.

    The demand for creatine is bigger when muscles are working at high levels... like intense training or a cycle race when we push ourselves. I understand it is thought by researchers/scientists that having creatine available has an impact on the ammount of force your muscles are able to make available.

    My understanding is that atheletes use up creatine (or creatin) more than less atheletic people (like most things our bodys need to make them meatbolise/work at a higher level) so it is useful if you are making demands of your muscles at high levels/high intensities to be aware of this. Extra creatine can be useful to your body, or your muscles may feel tired or not function as well for 1 or a few days after a big event.

    I replace creatine in my body naturally... that is, after time trial training, or significant hill work, or a longer than usual ride at reasonable intensity, I eat steak, or a meal like mince and pasta.
    Red meat is an excellent, easily metabolised source of creatine. Vegetarians and vegans may have to resort to supplements, but many of us shouldn't need to.
    Last edited by RoadRaven; 11-18-2005 at 10:57 AM.


    Courage does not always roar. Sometimes, it is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying,
    "I will try again tomorrow".


  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yasmin
    Thanks for that. I'm hoping to bulk up a bit in the quads so I can push the long, flat stretches harder. So, in theory, if I take creatin & keep working these muscles (& drink lots of fluid) I should bulk here. I'll try it.
    I found that I cramped a lot less and had more stamina when I was using it and I appreciated that there seem to be no long term effects from it's use...it just did what I needed for as long as I needed.

    Electra Townie 7D

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by traveller_62
    Let me start by saying I'm not a big fan of supplements(except standard multi-vitamins and calcium). We typically don't understand the long term impact of loading up on specific amino acids, minerals, etc. Most times the supposed benefits of taking supplements (by healthy individuals) are not subjected to rigorous scientific assessment.

    That said, there is a very nice treatment of Creatine at the following web site:

    http://www.sportsci.org/traintech/creatine/rbk.html

    The conclusion is that creatine may benefit performance and is probably pretty safe. What I really like about the site above is that they provide specific references for the claims/effects.

    -traveller
    WOW! Thanks for that. That's awesome information. I've downloaded it & will read it carefully. Cheers.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Posts
    165
    Quote Originally Posted by RoadRaven


    Creatine occurs naturally in meat (including fish) and milk (I think maybe in eggs too?).

    In humans, over 95% of the total creatine is located in skeletal muscle.

    Creatine is biosynthesized in liver, kidney and pancreas... the daily use of creatine for a 70kg person is about 2g. It plays an important role in the regulation and balance of skeletal muscle energy metabolism and is essential in the provision and transfer of energy.

    The demand for creatine is bigger when muscles are working at high levels... like intense training or a cycle race when we push ourselves. I understand it is thought by researchers/scientists that having creatine available has an impact on the ammount of force your muscles are able to make available.

    My understanding is that atheletes use up creatine (or creatin) more than less atheletic people (like most things our bodys need to make them meatbolise/work at a higher level) so it is useful if you are making demands of your muscles at high levels/high intensities to be aware of this. Extra creatine can be useful to your body, or your muscles may feel tired or not function as well for 1 or a few days after a big event.

    I replace creatine in my body naturally... that is, after time trial training, or significant hill work, or a longer than usual ride at reasonable intensity, I eat steak, or a meal like mince and pasta.
    Red meat is an excellent, easily metabolised source of creatine. Vegetarians and vegans may have to resort to supplements, but many of us shouldn't need to.
    Thankyou too. I'm learning so much.

 

 

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