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Thread: Bike overnights

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Nebraska
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    Bike overnights

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    About a week ago, I suddenly decided on an overnight camping trip to a local (23 miles from my front door) state park. The stars, (weather, work, all that) seemed to be aligned.

    All was well until I was called in to work for a few hours on the appointed day. How do they always know when I have other plans?

    Anyway, long story short, by the time I was ready to pull out, DH was home from work and it was getting a little late to take off. I did anyway. DH rode with me for a while to our local burger joint. I passed on eating a burger with him, as I was starting to feel pressed for time, but I was glad he could join me for a while.

    I really enjoyed the ride down to the park, however quickly the sun was heading toward the horizon. It was almost full dark by the time I got there, and I had the challenge of setting up a brand-new, first time out of the box tent. Hey, setting up a new tent by the light of a flashlight clenched in your teeth is fun!

    Dinner was a bagel with cream cheese and smoked salmon, veggies, & trail mix for dessert. And tea, always tea. If it weren't for my tea, I would have left the stove at home.

    I didn't need the rain fly, it was a beautiful star-lit night, so after dinner, I went to bed, enjoyed the stars for a while and slept.

    Breakfast was another no-cook-except-for-tea affair. I enjoyed the campsite for a while, then headed home. All in all it was a great little trip.

    Some highlights:

    Except for emergency gear, I used everything I took. I was glad not to have to use my tire kit, pump, emergency blanket, etc.

    The Kindle is a great companion on a bike trip.

    I'm really glad tent technology has progressed since the canvas umbrella tents that fit in the trunks of most '60s-era American cars. My brand-new tent was a breeze to set up.

    My sleeping bag is actually a quilt plus a silk sleep sack. This system works very well for me.

    The drivers on the highway were super polite, waiting, then pulling over into the other lane to pass me.

    Nebraska hills, on the other hand. . . but, hey, I can stay upright on that bike at ~2 mph.

    I still love my big, heavy, slow long wheel base recumbent for travel. It just works.
    Give big space to the festive dog that make sport in the roadway. Avoid entanglement with your wheel spoke.
    (Sign in Japan)

    1978 Raleigh Gran Prix
    2003 EZ Sport AX

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    where the wind comes sweeping down the plain
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    Yay! Sounds like a great sub 24 hour trip! I'm glad you still went, even tho daylight was running out. Sounds fabulous!!
    Did you take any pictures?


    We don't have many state parks nearby, or I would do more S24O's. The only recreation park close by is about 17 miles away, the rest (state parks and lake recreaction areas) are 50+. That's a bit too much for a fully-loaded overnight trip.
    I would love to do more overnights, especially in the summer when I'm off and DH can't get away.

    What's your next adventure?
    Check out my running blog: www.turtlepacing.blogspot.com

    Cervelo P2C (tri bike)
    Bianchi Eros (commuter/touring road bike)

    1983 Motobecane mixte (commuter/errand bike)
    Cannondale F5 mountain bike

  3. #3
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    Feb 2006
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    DE
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    I really love this idea. I think my tent is too big/heavy but for a short ride maybe it would work. What kind of camp stove are you carrying on these trips? Carrying my 40 yrs old Coleman 2-burner stove is out of the question!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Nebraska
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    No photos, sorry. It was kind of dark, you see...

    My stove is a cute little foldable thing that Sterno sells. After I burned the Sterno it came with, I put alcohol in the Sterno can and use that. It works pretty well and is light. Of course, I'll not be attempting a Thanksgiving dinner on that setup, but for my tea it is perfect.

    As for my next adventure, I think I'll take DH down there some time. Some things are just meant to be shared, like the chores and the weight of the tent.

    Beyond that, I really have no idea.
    Give big space to the festive dog that make sport in the roadway. Avoid entanglement with your wheel spoke.
    (Sign in Japan)

    1978 Raleigh Gran Prix
    2003 EZ Sport AX

  5. #5
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    Jan 2006
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    Massachusetts
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    What a wonderful little trip. And FYI, I've made Thanksgiving dinner on a tiny alcohol stove several times. Or I should say, the backpacking version of TG dinner. Stove-top stuffing, instant brown rice, canned turkey, and dried cranberries, all cooked together in one pot. Well, it tastes good when you're hungry enough.

    Quote Originally Posted by MomOnBike View Post
    My stove is a cute little foldable thing that Sterno sells. After I burned the Sterno it came with, I put alcohol in the Sterno can and use that. It works pretty well and is light. Of course, I'll not be attempting a Thanksgiving dinner on that setup, but for my tea it is perfect.
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
    1980 Columbus Frame with 1970 Campy parts
    1954 Raleigh 3-speed/Brooks B72

  6. #6
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    Apr 2006
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    Maine
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    Congradulations on your trip!!

    Withm, I just finished a self contained trip, and used a Jetboil stove. It's easy to use, and the mug that the water boils in can double as a dish to either drink out of use as a dish for the meal that you just cooked. I've used it for many backpacking trips, and really like it.

    Sorry to hijack the thread, simply wanted to answer a question.








    http://chasecyclery.blogspot.com

  7. #7
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    Boise Idaho
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    Love sub24 tours. Sounds like a perfect one too!
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ridebikeme View Post
    Congradulations on your trip!!

    Withm, I just finished a self contained trip, and used a Jetboil stove. It's easy to use, and the mug that the water boils in can double as a dish to either drink out of use as a dish for the meal that you just cooked. I've used it for many backpacking trips, and really like it.
    I've been looking at the Jetboil stoves online for some time but have not bought one yet. To do even 1-day overnights would mean getting a new tent and stove and to spend that much money on something that I might never do again, or do infrequently, seems a bit much.

    Of course I could just drive to the State Park with all my gear, and my bike to ride once I get there.... I could ride home, sleep in my own bed, ride back to the park and gather my gear and drive home again. LOL!

  9. #9
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    Maine
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    Yes, you're right that it is indeed expensive for us to have all of the toys. Is there anyone that you could borrow some of the gear from until you get your own? Any shops in your area where you can rent some of it? EMS comes to mind...

    Deb, your Thanksgiving meal sounds great... where were you when I was on the road a couple of weeks ago? LOL



    http://chasecyclery.blogspot.com

  10. #10
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    Well, there are cheap ways to go, such as sleeping under a tarp (preferrably after bug season), and building your own alcohol stove, though that takes some investment in learning. Maybe hosteling is alot easier and just as much fun. Substitute cheap hotels if there are no hostels in your area.
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
    1980 Columbus Frame with 1970 Campy parts
    1954 Raleigh 3-speed/Brooks B72

  11. #11
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    DE
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    Quote Originally Posted by ridebikeme View Post
    Yes, you're right that it is indeed expensive for us to have all of the toys. Is there anyone that you could borrow some of the gear from until you get your own? Any shops in your area where you can rent some of it? EMS comes to mind...

    http://chasecyclery.blogspot.com
    Sigh.... Seems I HAVE all the toys, but they just aren't the RIGHT toys for bike touring. I really like my tent but it probably weighs 7-8 pounds, my sleeping bag is probably OK, really need a new foam pad but it will do for now. But it's "heavy" too. And then there's the stove... I could easily spend $500 on this stuff but that money would be better spent to replace my 8 yr old computer that crashes daily.

    The nearest EMS is probably 100 miles. There is Gander Mt maybe 50 miles but their selection is more towards big car/truck camping, family sized tents, stand-up stoves, etc. Definitely not the "less is more" style of camping.

  12. #12
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    Jun 2004
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    Nebraska
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    DebW sez:

    And FYI, I've made Thanksgiving dinner on a tiny alcohol stove several times.
    But, but, but what about the butterhorn rolls? No way is it Thanksgiving dinner without the butterhorns.

    And as for budgets, I've been checking http://www.steepandcheap.com/ for bargains for years now. I made the quilt, as well. Making your own, buying cheap and in dribs and drabs is one way to keep the budget from (obviously) busting.
    Give big space to the festive dog that make sport in the roadway. Avoid entanglement with your wheel spoke.
    (Sign in Japan)

    1978 Raleigh Gran Prix
    2003 EZ Sport AX

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    where the wind comes sweeping down the plain
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    Quote Originally Posted by withm View Post
    Sigh.... Seems I HAVE all the toys, but they just aren't the RIGHT toys for bike touring. I really like my tent but it probably weighs 7-8 pounds, my sleeping bag is probably OK, really need a new foam pad but it will do for now. But it's "heavy" too. And then there's the stove... I could easily spend $500 on this stuff but that money would be better spent to replace my 8 yr old computer that crashes daily.
    I have a friend that I do backpacking trips and bike tours with. Her tent is huge and is about 8lbs. Her sleeping bag takes up nearly the whole rear rack (a Coleman from Walmart) and is heavy, and her stove is ancient. She still does it. I don't know how, but she does.

    Can you find things on eBay or some other kind of website. Used stuff is great. When I first started backpacking and bike touring I bought a used tent (about 5 lbs) and a stove (an older Jeboil version). Got both for under $50. Have upgraded since then...spent a little more than $50 this time...
    I recently bought a new Jetboil that I love. That thing is like magic- and so lightweight.
    Check out my running blog: www.turtlepacing.blogspot.com

    Cervelo P2C (tri bike)
    Bianchi Eros (commuter/touring road bike)

    1983 Motobecane mixte (commuter/errand bike)
    Cannondale F5 mountain bike

 

 

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