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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    15

    Wind + slow = bad thing

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    OK, I finally made it out to try some bikes this weekend. Didn't manage to find the one I was looking for but rode some Trek, Scott and Novara(?). The Novara was a 'Dutch Bike' with full metal fenders, rack, lights, etc. Love the look, but it seems too heavy for a 15 mile ride to work.

    The Treks at my local store were rather low end and didn't give much satisfaction though I did take a road bike out for a spin and that felt very light and lovely. The Scott Sub 45 was the most fun--despite being literally blown over by the wind twice.

    Yes, I have established that I am a total klutz. Crash #1: while trying to slowly turn a sharp corner to duck out of the wind behind a wall a 50 mph gust literally pushed me and the bike into a large landscaping rock--in full view of all shoppers, of course. Crash #2: While riding through the parking lot, happily trying to deduce the logic for the shifters I managed to dump the chain. While looking down trying to understand whether it was completely off I got slow, unintentionally turned sideways to the wind and went down again. This time there was a group of 8 cyclists out for a road trip to witness. D'Oh!

    Some days are better than others! But, my sense of humor survived and I did like the bike. The search will continue.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,135
    Do keep on keeping on!! I have had the bike blown out from under me as well...

    ... I assume you're basing the "too heavy" proclamation on riding? I have an extremely heavy genuine Dutch bike, but because it's so well engineered it rides like silk. ( Um, it's also flat as a pancake here, and I might feel differently if I had to haul it up inclines.) However, when it's windy or rainy, I *like* a heavy bike. It handles wind better and plows through the occasional flooding with more momentum, and the fenders etc. really are an asset since I really do ride in wahtever.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    15
    An interesting point about the weight. I have racked up a few km on actual Dutch bikes in the actual Dutch countryside and, yes, they can ride really well. My latest stint was near Oosterbeek--cycling up to the highest point in NL and in pretty hilly country. So they can do hills--or at least the Dutch can as I was walking for much of it!

    My concern about heavy is more around needing to occasionally get the thing 'under the bus'. We have bike racks on the buses around here but they are pretty much always full. So, plan B is that you get your bike into the luggage bays under the bus. Awkward enough if your bike is the only bike in the bay, downright painful when you are trying to layer multiple bikes which is usually the case.

    The idea of doing that with a heavy and fully decked out 'Dutch' bike is not appealing.

    So how did you come by your Dutch bike? Import?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,645
    I wouldn't get a heavy bike if I was going to have to be lifting it either. And my goodness, sounds like you were test riding your bike in EXTREME weather conditions. you've got guts, that's all i can say!
    WeLCOME TO TE!
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    209
    Crummy winds! Well, after you find the right bike and you have some good miles in, you will look back on that day and laugh even harder.

    Keep up the sense of humor and good luck with your search!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Great story; keep up the search, and welcome to TE!

    Let's see, light weight but that can take wind.

    A flatbar steel road bike with wider tires.

    But it always comes back to steel with me!
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    Posts
    10,952
    Steel is real, as some say, I love it myself. There are lighter weight steel bikes but they are costly and are generally custom.

    One advantage to a heavy steel bike in the wind is when you are in a cross wind - I find the additional weight of the bike really does help me in a strong cross wind. My touring bike weighs 35 pounds and I have taken it on very long rides - there are advantages to steel bikes.

    Good luck on your continued search!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,132
    Jamis offers some steel bikes that are neither terribly expensive nor terribly heavy.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Scroll down to 'Steel Performance' and 'Touring/Commuting:

    http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/thebikes/road/index.html
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,132
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Scroll down to 'Steel Performance' and 'Touring/Commuting:

    http://www.jamisbikes.com/usa/thebikes/road/index.html
    The Quest and Satellite are options, too.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    15
    Thanks, ladies!!!

    I'm liking those Jamis bikes and I appreciate the info on steel as well as the comments on crosswinds. Unfortunately, here 50 mph gusts are not that uncommon and I will be riding across the wind for the most part. I still like the idea of keeping the 'empty weight' of the bike under 30#s though due to the bus issue. The Jamis look like they qualify. Now to see if there is a dealer, and how much they cost...

    The advice is much appreciated!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    6,132
    Cool! I think you'll find Jamis to be reasonably price. I have the 2010 Aurora and my husband has the 2011. The 2011 is a really pretty color. The only things we didn't love right off the bat were the fender and brake pads. Those aren't too expensive to swap out, however. There are a number of other models that could work for you, too.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

 

 

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