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  1. #1
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    Nov 2009
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    Grip vs Triggers

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    I didn't realize that grip shifters are available for all of the top levels of SRAM. What are the advantages? Might they be a little easier on my hands, or is that simply a matter of adjustment? Just curious if someone has experience with them.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Flagstaff AZ
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    I've used grip shift and triggers as you call them; it really depends on what you like the best and what you are used to. I've ridden both enough that I can ride either. Actually one bike has triggers one old bike has grip shift. Grip shift works better for me because I have problems with my thumb joints so pushing with my thumb is painful.

    If I were completely honest, I think that I like grip shift best, but like I said, I use both and as long as the bike is shifting well and maintained well, it doesn't really matter that much.

    I've had bike shops tell me that grip shift takes more maintenance, i.e. fine tuning to keep it shifting well. Don't know if that is really true or not.

    spoke

  3. #3
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    Nov 2009
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    Indianapolis, Indiana
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    Sometimes I do have problems with my thumbs...perhaps this would be a good thing for me to check into. I need to test-ride a bike with SRAM off the trainer anyway, so it sounds like a good idea that I also test one with grips. I wonder how different the handlebar set-up would be? hmmmm thanks!

    Edited - I guess I should call them "twister" rather than grip shifters.
    Last edited by Catrin; 02-01-2011 at 02:11 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Twister shifters are actually less maintenance than triggers - there's less to break. Twisters are also friction shifting, which means you can trim the front derailleur and have less issues with cross training.

    I know I used to hate them on my cheap bikes from however long ago, shifting was hard and hurt my hands - but I imagine that quality grip shifters don't require that much effort.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    1,375
    Can't stand twist shifters. They are hard on my wrists, I have to move my hands away from a comfortable position on the HB to use them, and they are extra hard to use with sweaty hands.
    Just another point of view
    I have paul thumbies on 1 bike (replacement for twisties, but I honestly don't have the bike yet, so don't know what I think of them), rapid fires on another (replacement for the twisties when I couldn't take it any more), and bar ends on my last bike. I like the bar ends the best. None of these are mt bikes, I don't ride them anymore, I'm too old and boring now. But, I had rapid fires on my Mt bike and loved them over the twisties they replaced.
    On a mt bike, I'd go with rapid fires (do they still make them?).
    Last edited by TsPoet; 02-01-2011 at 02:54 PM.
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  6. #6
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    Nov 2009
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    Indianapolis, Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cataboo View Post
    Twister shifters are actually less maintenance than triggers - there's less to break. Twisters are also friction shifting, which means you can trim the front derailleur and have less issues with cross training.

    I know I used to hate them on my cheap bikes from however long ago, shifting was hard and hurt my hands - but I imagine that quality grip shifters don't require that much effort.
    I did not know they are friction shifters, that is something to keep in mind. Then again, my long experience with friction shifting were those terrible bar-ends on my Surly before I converted her to indexed triggers. Nothing that a good test ride won't help me decide...thanks for the information!

    I do appreciate all of the different perspectives - I do LIKE triggers - so I will really have to like the twisters to change.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Looking at all the love there that's sleeping
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    I have Grip Shift on my mtb, and triggers on my commuter.

    I really like the Grip Shifts. I find them to be more intuitive than triggers, easier to slam through multiple gear changes, and generally easier to deal with. No straining reaching thumbs. I do NOT find I mis-shift or shift accidentally when I have a death-grip on the bars in scary sections. (not that I ever mtb in "scary" sections anymore!)

    The downside is when you ride 2 bikes with different shifters...I tend to get all be-fuddled, trying to learn how to shift again.

    But, maybe that's just me.
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  8. #8
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    Nov 2009
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    Please forgive if this is a silly question, but I am trying to picture how twisters are installed - at the end of the bars? I can't think of any other way they could be, but what do I know? If they are indeed at the end of the bar, then that would free up room on the bar...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    I only have one bike with grip shifters, which I'm not sure how I will like. I picked it up cheap on craigslist a month or so ago for a 2nd mountain bike. And it was cheap enough that I was just thrilled it had nice quality components and was 9 speed (the craigslist listing had no details)

    But this is where grip shifters are:

    Last edited by Cataboo; 02-01-2011 at 06:19 PM.

  10. #10
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    Nov 2009
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    Indianapolis, Indiana
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cataboo View Post
    I only have one bike with grip shifters, which I'm not sure how I will like. I picked it up cheap on craigslist a month or so ago for a 2nd mountain bike. And it was cheap enough that I was just thrilled it had nice quality components and was 8 speed (the craigslist listing had no details)
    Awesome, I like that better than what I was envisioning - thanks! I just need to find one to test ride when all of this ice goes away. I have 3-4 weeks or so before I have to decide on my final build...

  11. #11
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    Aug 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catrin View Post
    Awesome, I like that better than what I was envisioning - thanks! I just need to find one to test ride when all of this ice goes away. I have 3-4 weeks or so before I have to decide on my final build...
    Chainlove has had some of the sram pieces up periodically - they had the x-o twister shifters a week ago for $42 + shipping. So if you keep an eye out, you might be able to pick up pieces for your bike cheaper than what your bike shop can buy them for.

    The bf loves sram grip shifters - he doesn't have any problem with it and likes that they're pretty much no maintenance and he can adjust the trim on the front derailleur to get rid of any cross training issues.

    I've only test ridden that mountain bike for a bit, but not long enough to tell how I will like it long term. It did work much better than I remember my costco hybrid with grip shifters worked. Yes, if you have sweaty hands, it can be hard to shift - but I always ride with gloves, so that's not an issue for me. Gloves probably will solve the issue of me remembering grip shifters hurt my hands on the costco hybrid (it was more the friction on it)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Centennial, CO
    Posts
    340
    I have grip shifters on one bike and trigger shifters on my commuter and mountain bike - while I do like being able to trim with twist shifters, I LOVE and prefer trigger shifters and find I don't have a need to trim on them. Especially in the cold or the rain when I can't really grip or feel my hands, trigger still works.
    Jenn K
    Centennial, CO
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    California
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    371
    I think trigger shifters have more mechanical advantage. The triggers might be two inch long levers with the cable spooling around a one inch spool.

    With twist shifters, the grip might have a one inch radius and the cable is also being wound onto a one inch spool. Thus the twisters will need twice the force of triggers. Of course this action is also done with different muscles.

  14. #14
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    Nov 2009
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
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    Interesting comparison. I have found that I need to trim my triggers on the LHT rather frequently. I must also say that they are not mountain bike triggers, but a special trigger shifter that Shimano makes to work with a road crank/road bike. I don't have to trim as much as I used to, but it still requires a good amount. I will need to re-learn how to shift regardless on whether I go with SRAM (trigger or twister) or XT.

    So I am hearing that twisters can take more effort to shift, though of course different muscles are used, and sweat can be an issue but gloves should take care of that. I can have problems with my thumbs, but can also have wrist problems depending upon position. I will see what I can do about a test ride on a bike with a twister shifter.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maine
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    983

    Grip vs triggers

    I have used both for many years, and definietly can say that I prefer gripshift over trigger. With that said, I 'll also say that quality wise they are pretty equal, it's simply a preference. The only mechanical diiference is that on a mtn bike if I come around a corner and see a monster hill where I have to shift a lot in a hurry, I can shift the entire range with gripshift and with triggers shift 3-4 at a time until I get where I need to be.. which means that I'd be off the bike. Now, that truly isn't a big deal, and one that only applies when I'm in the woods and on a trail that I don't know the course.

    Do any of your freinds have bikes that you could ride to see if you'd prefer one over the other? Demo rides at your shop?

    Have fun figuring it out, and building yuor new bike... it's very exciting!!

 

 

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