Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 30
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    94

    rain + cold commute

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Hello friends,

    So... I did some searching in the forum about this already but didn't quite resolve all of my questions.

    What do you all wear when it is cold and raining for your commute?

    I live in Austin. (Yes, I'm sure the fact that I am calling our 50 degree weather right now "cold" is laughable to some of you...)

    I usually commute by bike as long as it isn't raining/too cold. (I worry a lot about safety with rain---mostly the fact that cars do a lot more skidding in it....but that is a different thread!)

    But, my car's alternator went out, and I am carless...thus, I will be commuting in the rain/cold anyway this week.

    Thus....I am trying to figure out what to wear. I have tried lots of combinations of waterproof pants/waterproof top jacket layer...but I still find that ultimately I am getting wet and cold.

    Largely, my face freezes. My hands freeze. My feet freeze.

    I have "cold weather gear" for my face---but it does nothing once it is wet. And, even when it is cold I end up chapped with dry, cracky, painful skin.
    I have cycling gloves meant for cold weather---but my hands go numb still.
    Feet: Shoes inevitably end up wet + wind rushing through shoe material
    I have a "splash gaurd" for the back wheel to prevent the back splash.

    Am I missing something?? How do you ladies stay dry(er) and warm(er) when you ride in rain/cold???

    Specifically, what do you do for your face/hands/feet that helps??

    Thank you!
    -Cold and Wet in Austin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,645
    if your whole body is warmer, the cold face won't be so bad.
    How far/long is your commute?
    also you get used to colder temps, which for you are in the 50's .
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Weir, TX
    Posts
    403
    I think the biggest problem more than the cold is that it's foggy/drizzly on top of it... it's a slow insidious wetness. Real rain would probably be more tolerable... the cold alone, probably not a big deal.

    I don't have any suggestions, but I am curious to hear solutions... I'm reticent to get on the bike in this weather because it's just yucky

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,083
    This is not the answer you're hoping for... but basically:
    wear wool,
    ride fast,
    suck it up
    and hope you have a drying cupboard at work.

    It works for me, but not very well...
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,936
    A fender for your front wheel will keep your feet a lot more dry.

    Thin layer glove + dishwashing gloves. The dishwashing gloves are pretty much windproof, and the layer keeps you warmer. Go for a size bigger than usual on the dishwashing gloves. (Plus, your hand signals will be very clear.)

    Wool is good. I have a thin wool cap that fits under my helmet. It keeps my feet warmer. (No joke.)

    A good-quality rain jacket is nice. Does not have to be cycling-specific, although that helps.

    If it's really POURING I wear rain pants and gum boots with thick wool socks. Not very comfortable, but keeps my feet dry.

    If it's really COLD I wear my winter boots, those that are designed for Montreal winters. I don't think you'll ever need that in Austin.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Between the Blue Ridge and the Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    5,226
    Keep your head warm. The rest of you will also be warmer.

    Hi viz rain jacket is a must. Layer underneath--that's going to be trial and error to find out what works for you. But a few layers are better than one heavy layer.

    Shoe covers help keep your feet warm and dry.

    How far is your commute?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,738
    Fenders make a tremendous difference in keeping you dry from below. They help even if it's not raining, but the roads are wet.

    I have some windproof and " breathable waterproof" socks by Seirus. They're neither totally waterproof or totally breathable, but they do make a big difference on wet or windy days.

    Last but not least, a waterproof helmet cover can make a big difference. I have one by Louis Garneau that's nice, and I'm sure that Gore makes them as well.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    94
    Thanks guys. These are good tips.

    Clarifying details: My commute is about 30-45 minutes each way. It will get colder in Austin at some point (or, at least, it usually does). But, never really colder than 30.

    Helmet cover: good thought. Didn't know they had those. Makes sense

    Front fender: didn't know these existed. Good to know.

    Dish gloves: Never would have thought of that. Makes sense--- Definitely going to look into this!!


    Ultimately, I'll probably just have to suck it up

    But, it does get more complicated when I have to run errands in the day and commute several times-- Either have to put wet clothes back on, or carry multiple pairs!

    Such is life, i suppose!

    Thanks for your thoughts!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    12
    While Gore-Tex clothing is expensive, but it works very well in wintry weather.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,083
    Hands are the worst in cold and rainy weather, I have yet to find a pair of waterproof gloves that work in cold rain. I think the tip of dishwasher gloves with a thin wool liner is probably at least as good as any expensive waterproof gloves you can find.

    Feet - I have neoprene shoe covers that delay the water, and keep me warmish once my feet are wet. With medium thick wool socks it's ok, but my shoes need vigorous drying afterwards anyway.

    Face - I swear by a little vaseline or similar on exposed skin in wet or cold weather, especially areas like around your nose which easily get damp. A Buff/neck gaiter helps when it gets cool, but in wet weather wool is better.

    But to be honest, if I didn't have a drying cupboard at work I probably wouldn't commute in the rain...
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,135
    You've had good advice, especially the "ride fast" -- honestly, going fast enough to generate heat is what makes most difference for me. I can't do wool (allergies) so I layer up, and when it's the nastiest -- cold *and* wet -- then I make sure I"m wearing the higher-tech stuff. I've got two layers of gloves and duckboots for when it's really wet (but I'm shopping for something better for the feet).
    I don't have a "drying cupboard," but I've got a computer under my desk and can drape at least one thign where it will dry without shorting things out... and I'll bring along spares. Makes for lots of laundry, though.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,845
    I really don't ride much in the rain - but if I do... I just treat rain like I do skiing and mostly wear my ski gear.

    I have goretex outer gloves that are waterproof that I wear over liner gloves.

    I have neoprene over shoes and waterproof bike shoes - but you might be able to use like paddling socks or neoprene socks for wet.

    If it's a drizzle rain, I'll just use softshell pants which will get rid of most of the rain. Rain pants - I like the patagonia spraymaster pants. They're waterproof, stretchy, tapered at the bottoms, and full zip.

    Jackets - goretex rain jacket.

    Face... I think I have a neoprene like full face mask from serius - I use it skiing and it does get wet from skiing (mostly my breath going out wets it), but it stays warm and protects the face from wind.

    You can maybe put the rain jacket hood underneath your helmet to try to keep things dryer at the neck.

    I definitely can keep myself dry skiing (even if it's pouring rain while skiing, which has happened a few times)... but typically if I'm out in the rain on the bike it's 'cause it started raining on me and not that I started off biking in the rain... So how well any of this works to keep you dry on a bike, I don't really know.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    94
    LPH: I'm with you----I am yet to find gloves that work well for me! I am going to try the dish gloves idea! GOod thought on shoe covers...and the face/vaseline. Enlighten me--what is a drying cupboard??

    Catriona: Good thoughts on the ski gear. I need to dig out some of my face warmers/warming under layers and such.

    Geonz: Yes. Lots of laundry on my end too! I don't have a great drying space for anything. I have a locker in the gym....but.... when I put clothes in there, they don't dry out so well (even hung inside). Not enough ventilation/space, I think. Otherwise, I would have to tote my wet clothes around with me to each classroom and lay them out somewhere ;/

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,083
    oops, sorry. I never think that I might not be using the right name. If it sounds good to me, I go for it

    A large, well, cupboard or locker, if you like, looks like a large fridge. Metal. Has a heating element and a fan installed at the top that blows warm air down inside, and is "furnished" with racks inside to hang clothes on. Commonly used to dry clothes or laundry indoors but they make a bit of a racket. We have 5! of them at my workplace, dearly beloved by the winter cyclists.

    So what do you call them?
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,738
    Quote Originally Posted by lph View Post
    A large, well, cupboard or locker, if you like, looks like a large fridge. Metal. Has a heating element and a fan installed at the top that blows warm air down inside, and is "furnished" with racks inside to hang clothes on. Commonly used to dry clothes or laundry indoors but they make a bit of a racket. We have 5! of them at my workplace, dearly beloved by the winter cyclists.

    So what do you call them?
    I've never even seen something like that- how cool!

    At work, I have some magnetic hooks stuck to my bookcase, and all my stuff hangs there to dry.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •