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  1. #1
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    fighting cats- help!

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    DH and I have two cats- one male and one female, about a year apart in age. Both are rescues and come with a certain amount of bagagge. The male was rescued from a hoarder's house (so we're told) and is very gregarious, attention-seeking, and outgoing. The female was a stray who lived under a barn for a few months and spent another few months living at the vet's office. She is shy, aloof, and suspicious. They've mostly existed peacefully for the past 8 years, although we've tolerated the occasional fight.

    However, recently, the fighting has escalated. From a "pounce-swat-hiss and done" to full-on body blows and quite a bit of yowling from the pouncee. The male is the instigator every time, and it seems to be in conjunction with wanting something (food or attention). They are fed in separate rooms, and we have 3 litter boxes. So no conflicts there...

    I'm ready to separate them and re-introduce them. Anything to re-establish some level of tranquility. Any ideas or advice on how to best resolve the conflict?
    Last edited by Becky; 10-05-2009 at 07:09 AM.

  2. #2
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    that's what I'd do. Separate and reintroduce.
    Or every time he starts this behavior quietly pick him up and put him in a kennel or a bathroom or something.
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  3. #3
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    Maybe make sure the female is healthy too. When I've had bouts of aggression among my cats it's often been because the pouncee was sick and the other cat(s) somehow knew and took advantage of it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biciclista View Post
    that's what I'd do. Separate and reintroduce.
    Or every time he starts this behavior quietly pick him up and put him in a kennel or a bathroom or something.

    Any ideas on the best way to re-introduce? My sister currently has my "Cat vs. Cat" book, and I don't want to separate if I have no idea how to meaningfully re-introduce them.

    I'd put him in timeout, except he's most likely to do this before we get up in the morning, when he's hungry and lonely. I am going to try the timeout thing around dinnertime, just to see what happens. Think I could use the basement for timeout?

    They're getting regular vet checks and, aside from the female's weight issues, everyone is healthy.

    Thanks for the advice. Keep it coming- I need all the help that I can get!

  5. #5
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    put him in a room for a few days, maybe a week even if you can stand it. They can still talk under the door. Then let him out.. Since they got along for so long, he might just forget the spat. Do consider what Kim said too, there might be something wrong with one of them.
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    steuben county new york
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    My parents have 2 cats, same mom, different litters. They fight, with the male getting the best of the female. (Sister is very shy, slender and skittish, brother is just a big 25# bully but loves the attention.) My mom would put him in the basement for awhile, like an hour or so, then let him back up. Whenever he entaginized his sister, basement for him. It's decreased this behavior but he still tries to get away with it...
    formerly known as shellyj

  7. #7
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    Mar 2008
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    I swear....they know when you're planning something. I was all set to pack the male off to time-out at the first sign of scrapping, and he was an absolute angel last night. Furthermore, DH said that the pre-breakfast spat was minor (compared to what they've been lately!). What is it about cats that makes them so darn perceptive? So I haven't tried the basement time-out yet...

    Thanks for all of the suggestions!

  8. #8
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    Oct 2005
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    You mentioned that they have regular vet checkup, does this include a good blood panel? If not, I would suggest you take both cats in and request a senior panel. This, I would think, would include a check of their thyroid levels. Hyperthyroidism is common in older cats and can manifest itself in aggressive behavior. Just a thought/suggestion.
    Marcie

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by makbike View Post
    You mentioned that they have regular vet checkup, does this include a good blood panel? If not, I would suggest you take both cats in and request a senior panel. This, I would think, would include a check of their thyroid levels. Hyperthyroidism is common in older cats and can manifest itself in aggressive behavior. Just a thought/suggestion.
    Yes, it does. So far, all thyroid levels have been normal. Thanks for the idea- it's definitely something to research and consider. If this nonsense keeps up, we'll be back at the vet's and I'll ask for updated bloodwork.

  10. #10
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Shelbyville, KY
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    If you find it not a medical issue but a behavioral one ask your vet about DAP plug-ins. These dispense natural pheromones which reduce stress. You might also trip some "relief remedy" which can be purchased at a health food store. You can add it to their water, rub it on their ears or gums. Many cat owners swear by its effectiveness. Hope things settle down in your home. Keep us posted.
    Marcie

 

 

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