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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    2,560

    Walking slowly makes me tired

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    I noticed this first in museums, and now it's coming up in birdwatching. Walking slowly for a couple of hours makes me exhausted.

    I'm not an athlete but I'm quite fit. I don't own a car, so I walk (fast), Xootr or cycle everywhere I go. I carry home virtually everything I buy.

    On my last group birdwatching venture, someone actually asked if I was okay (I was, but I was fading).

    Anyone have ideas? Is this some metabolic state, or is it just me? I am actually avoiding birding with other people (it's city birding, so I can Xootr when I'm alone).

    Pam

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Md suburbs of Wash. DC
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    2,131
    I'll be curious to see responses to this, too, because I have the same experience. I can hike for a few hours before feeling fatigued, but 1-2 hours in a museum wipes me out.
    "How about if we all just try to follow these very simple rules of the road? Drive like the person ahead on the bike is your son/daughter. Ride like the cars are ambulances carrying your loved ones to the emergency room. This should cover everything, unless you are a complete sociopath."
    David Desautels, in a letter to velonews.com

    Random babblings and some stuff to look at.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Maryland
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    682
    I think this is pretty universal! I was in a PhD program for art history, so I spent way too much time in museums with other people who also spent way too much time in museums and we all had the same experience no matter what our level of fitness.

    A couple of weekends ago I was working at a horse jumping event and my job was to go around with the photographer taking pictures in the sponsor tent. I spent nearly nine hours walking slowly that day and was nearly dead.

    The only thing I can think that helps (temporarily) is to stop and stretch from time to time and then move fast for a while--jog in place or do some jumping jacks if there's no space to cover territory quickly.

    Sarah

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,375
    I think its the feet. 1 hr of walking slowly/standing, and my feet and lower legs hurt.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
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    6,982
    My life is like yours...we don't have car, so I cycle, take transit or walk.

    Have you had your iron levels checked?

    I'm not at all bothered by walking around for several hrs. in museums or galleries. I never have been but I'm a lover of such places.

    Whereas my dearie finds many public buildings and office buildings exacerbate his sinus problems and literally might cause him headaches, make him tired/sleepy. For those with engineering background, some buildings are not properly constructed,.."tight building syndrom" with proper fresh air ventilation, circulation. Dearie actually can't stand air-conditioned buildings. It exhausts him abit and causes these other symptoms.

    Finally for myself, after doing alot of cycling for past few years, I sometimes get BORED of walking long distances. ie. over 5 kms. Especially if the pedestrian scenery is boring and the route is totally flat. I itch to get onto a bike..to get to my destination faster and in a more freewheeling way.

    Snowshoeing is different because one has to pay attention to placement of feet onto surfaces/grades, etc. and weather conditions along with changing scenery.

    I have been using customized orthotics for past 10+ years in my athletic shoes and boots.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Central Indiana
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    6,132
    Quote Originally Posted by Kalidurga View Post
    I'll be curious to see responses to this, too, because I have the same experience. I can hike for a few hours before feeling fatigued, but 1-2 hours in a museum wipes me out.
    Me, too! For one thing, walking slowly kills my back. I have to bend down to periodically to touch my toes so that my hamstrings get a good stretch. Hiking or walking quickly keeps my hamstrings stretched out more and my lower back doesn't hurt as much.

    For another, I think my mind just starts to glaze over and it makes me feel tired. I can only take museums in small doses, and even then, I'd rather be outside. It took three trips to Paris before I ventured into the Louvre.

    I imagine some of it has to do with blood flow, too. Walking quickly gets the blood going, while standing and/or walking slowly does not.
    Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Listen hard. Practice wellness. Play with abandon. Laugh. Choose with no regret. Continue to learn. Appreciate your friends. Do what you love. Live as if this is all there is.

    --Mary Anne Radmacher

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    MI
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    2,546
    Me three!

    Shopping, museums, ugh! Its exhausting. I'd rather do 12 miles carrying a 30 lb pack on a trail then spend all day "slow walking".

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
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    4,083
    Yep, me too. But I think it's the flat terrain and repetitive movement that's to blame, not the speed (apart from it being boring in addition). I can bike 2-3 hrs every single day, or hike all day, but a day's Christmas shopping will kill me.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
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    Quote Originally Posted by limewave View Post
    Me three!

    Shopping, museums, ugh! Its exhausting. I'd rather do 12 miles carrying a 30 lb pack on a trail then spend all day "slow walking".

    Shopping by walking around for several hrs., is dang boring to me now.
    I enjoy hiking but never with heavy backpacks.

    I've always had a long-term interest in art (and when I get my *** to moving, do some of it)..we in fact have done several cycling art studio tours on our own. I will seek out major art galleries and museums in the cities that I visit.

    Certain historic eras of certain countries interest me. ie. history of the New England states interest me more..than Lewis and Clark expedition stuff.
    My Personal blog on cycling & other favourite passions.
    遙知馬力日久見人心 Over a long distance, you learn about the strength of your horse; over a long period of time, you get to know whatís in a personís heart.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
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    yep, that's why i hate shopping!
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    MD
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    1,628
    Add me to the list. When my Mum was alive, she used to love to tell people how she could "out walk" me. I'd point out that she can "out stroll" me. I can power walk forever. But dang that strolling wears me out.
    You too can help me fight cancer, and get a lovely cookbook for your very own! My team's cookbook is for sale Click here to order. Proceeds go to our team's fundraising for the Philly Livestrong Challenge!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Hillsboro, OR
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    5,050
    I have this problem too...or at least, I do now. A day in 'shopping mode' is more exhausting than a day of working on our farm! This never used to be the case for me, though. I used to work in retail, so I'd spend 5-6 days a week for 9-10 hours on my feet and basically walking slow. I was used to it. I'm not anymore (thank goodness!).

    I really think it comes down to conditioning. Walking slowly is a totally different way of using your muscles than walking fast, or jogging, or hiking, or biking. I think that if you did it every day, you'd get used to it and it wouldn't tire you out as much.

    I can't help with the boredom factor though!
    My new non-farm blog: Finding Freedom

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    931
    Quote Originally Posted by Biciclista View Post
    yep, that's why i hate shopping!
    ++++1

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Posts
    818
    WOW! I have always hated to shop. It is sooo exhausting. Now I know why. Thanks everyone. bikerHen

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
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    What you all said for sure, but I think posture has a lot to do with it as well. If you're a pronator who tends to lean forward while standing, then you're really stressing your back body when you're not moving fast enough that your forward lean is an advantage.

    That's me, anyway.

    Plus, in the specific case of museums and galleries, there's the fact that your brain uses something like 80% of the calories your body burns, and vision uses more than any other sense. Looking at stuff all day is exhausting - even if you're sitting down.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

 

 

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