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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    182

    Specialized Myka FSR Comp - opinions?

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    Hi all...I just discovered this forum and glad I did! I'm a relatively new road cyclist and ride the Specialized Ruby Comp. I'm now looking into mountain bikes, and since Specialized is all I know, I'm thinking of the 2009 Myka FSR Comp. From what I know it has all the features I'd want in a mountain bike but I live in a small town and looks like I wouldn't be able to test it out before ordering. I should have a chance to try out a similar one, but was wondering if there is anyone out there who has it and what it feels like. I tried out a Gary Fisher...it road well, but didn't feel quite right for me. I don't want to jump into it tooo fast for a $2000 bike, but at the same time, I want to get on the trails!! Let me know what you think!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    the dry side
    Posts
    4,403
    I would not buy a mountain bike without trying it out. Roadies coming over to the dark side don't always understand what a mtb should feel like, and many times will accept too big/too long as OK. Specialized does make awesome bikes, but I would spend some time researching frame sizes that fit someone of your proportions well.

    I have a Spec FSR expert, WSD and I love it ---it's the demo of what I think became the Myka last year. I am 5-3.5 and ride a medium Women's frame, I have split proportions of leg/torso.

    See if your shop will order one with out you having to buy it. There is NO WAY I would spend $2K on a bike if I couldn't try it first. Too many times you buy a bike without trying it, and the fit is NOT perfect and they try to convince you to take it any, "oh we'll just change the stem" for you. Which is not the same thing as a bike frame that is the right size.

    Take a road trip to a place that has a good selection of different brands/sizes. Or, join a gals ride where you could try lots of differnt bikes just by trading.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    182
    Thanks for your reply...looks like I'll be able to test one out this week, sooo pumped!
    I'm about the same height as you, and was told the medium would probably be the right size, but I'll see what the test ride is like.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    271
    I agree 100% with Irulan. I'm glad you are going to be able to test ride the bike to get a feel for it. I am also 5'3.5" and ride a Spec Era Marathon in a medium and it fits a treat. I'm a bit short in the body but with longer legs and gorilla arms. I believe when I had my fitting session we went one size shorter in the stem even so.

    One other thing to carry in the back of your mind is that I think that women who have been roadies (guilty as charged your honour) and more particularly women roadies who have always ridden "men's bikes" often under-estimate the effect that too long a top tube on an MTB will have.

    We are used to a more laid forward and stretched out position and may be inclined towards thinking that the WSD bike in the right size is too short for us. I found it weird feeling how upright and over the bars I was on a WSD MTB. But once I started to realise how much you need to be able to be mobile over the bike and shift your weight so far forward and back, I realised that in the stretched out position of a longer top tube I would never have been able to get far enough back and still control the bike!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    182
    Hi Pinkbikes...
    That's one thing I was thinking, how much different the position and feel will be like on mountain bikes compared to roadies, but thanks for the advice...that gives me the idea that it's supposed to be different! I actually excited to see how the climbs will be!


    Quote Originally Posted by pinkbikes View Post
    I agree 100% with Irulan. I'm glad you are going to be able to test ride the bike to get a feel for it. I am also 5'3.5" and ride a Spec Era Marathon in a medium and it fits a treat. I'm a bit short in the body but with longer legs and gorilla arms. I believe when I had my fitting session we went one size shorter in the stem even so.

    One other thing to carry in the back of your mind is that I think that women who have been roadies (guilty as charged your honour) and more particularly women roadies who have always ridden "men's bikes" often under-estimate the effect that too long a top tube on an MTB will have.

    We are used to a more laid forward and stretched out position and may be inclined towards thinking that the WSD bike in the right size is too short for us. I found it weird feeling how upright and over the bars I was on a WSD MTB. But once I started to realise how much you need to be able to be mobile over the bike and shift your weight so far forward and back, I realised that in the stretched out position of a longer top tube I would never have been able to get far enough back and still control the bike!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    the dry side
    Posts
    4,403
    Quote Originally Posted by pinkbikes View Post
    I agree 100% with Irulan. I'm glad you are going to be able to test ride the bike to get a feel for it. I am also 5'3.5" and ride a Spec Era Marathon in a medium and it fits a treat. I'm a bit short in the body but with longer legs and gorilla arms. I believe when I had my fitting session we went one size shorter in the stem even so.

    One other thing to carry in the back of your mind is that I think that women who have been roadies (guilty as charged your honour) and more particularly women roadies who have always ridden "men's bikes" often under-estimate the effect that too long a top tube on an MTB will have.

    We are used to a more laid forward and stretched out position and may be inclined towards thinking that the WSD bike in the right size is too short for us. I found it weird feeling how upright and over the bars I was on a WSD MTB. But once I started to realise how much you need to be able to be mobile over the bike and shift your weight so far forward and back, I realised that in the stretched out position of a longer top tube I would never have been able to get far enough back and still control the bike!
    great explanation of the issues with changing from a road type fit to a mtb fit.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    The City By The Bay
    Posts
    10
    I have this bike and I love it! I got the 2008 model for a steal at my LBS (less than $500). I ride it to work every day and anytime I have to go somewhere within the city. Even though I'm not using it for the traditional MTB purpose, it's still a great bike.

    Let us know what you think!
    "The bicycle is just as good company as most husbands and, when it gets old and shabby, a woman can dispose of it and get a new one without shocking the entire community."
    Ann Strong, Minneapolis Tribune, 1895

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    271
    Quote Originally Posted by bluejellybean View Post
    Hi Pinkbikes...
    That's one thing I was thinking, how much different the position and feel will be like on mountain bikes compared to roadies, but thanks for the advice...that gives me the idea that it's supposed to be different! I actually excited to see how the climbs will be!
    It's funny really. I had never thought I would enjoy mountain biking. I was so into the whole efficiency of roadies and how light and fast and "every joule of energy you put in sends you forward" they are.

    But some of this was because I just hopped onto my DH's MTB which was silly really since it was a low-end duallie built for somebody a whole foot taller than me. It was like riding a tractor.

    So riding a well-fitted, nicely-specced hard tail was a good start for a roadie. It felt really odd and upright and forward. But I soon leanred how to throw my weight around it and then moved onto the Era when I was ready for a duallie. It still climbs well thanks to the Brain, which I have set pretty much one click off the firmest setting.

    As a roadie who is no doubt accustomed to a firm climbing platform, you may need to talk to whoever sets you up on it about suspension settings that will allow you to get used to the somewhat more bouncy life of FSR. As for climbing, you will find it funny. When I ride the roadie I would sit to descend and bounce up out of the saddle a lot to bust over the top for shorter climbs. On the MTB I do the opposite - hit the attack position (standing) almost all the time and sit to climb! Just remember that to get traction you need to find a sweet spot for your weight. I well remember my coach preaching "The S on the nose of that Specialized seat is for Sphincter, so that's where it should be!"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    182
    That's exactly what I'm going through...I think the reason I love road cycling is for the speed and distance I can get out of it...I've always been an endurance person...then something hit me recently, maybe the need to shake things up a bit and I want to do some cross training in the trails!
    I also took a guys bike out in the parking lot, WAY too big, so I think getting the proper bike, proper fit will feel amazing!

    Quote Originally Posted by pinkbikes View Post
    It's funny really. I had never thought I would enjoy mountain biking. I was so into the whole efficiency of roadies and how light and fast and "every joule of energy you put in sends you forward" they are.

    But some of this was because I just hopped onto my DH's MTB which was silly really since it was a low-end duallie built for somebody a whole foot taller than me. It was like riding a tractor.

    So riding a well-fitted, nicely-specced hard tail was a good start for a roadie. It felt really odd and upright and forward. But I soon leanred how to throw my weight around it and then moved onto the Era when I was ready for a duallie. It still climbs well thanks to the Brain, which I have set pretty much one click off the firmest setting.

    As a roadie who is no doubt accustomed to a firm climbing platform, you may need to talk to whoever sets you up on it about suspension settings that will allow you to get used to the somewhat more bouncy life of FSR. As for climbing, you will find it funny. When I ride the roadie I would sit to descend and bounce up out of the saddle a lot to bust over the top for shorter climbs. On the MTB I do the opposite - hit the attack position (standing) almost all the time and sit to climb! Just remember that to get traction you need to find a sweet spot for your weight. I well remember my coach preaching "The S on the nose of that Specialized seat is for Sphincter, so that's where it should be!"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    271
    Oh it will be amazing. I am quite the enthusiastic convert now. There is something about the physical challenge of the obstacles and the sheer adrenalin rush that really gets you in. I even stopped riding my roadie for a little while because I thougth it was boring!

    Thankfully I'm over that now and have things back in proper perspective (you know - you should love all your children, even if for different reasons!) There was a great thread a while ago about why people who rode both roadies and mtbs liked them both. It really put it in perspective.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
    Posts
    5,310
    Mot to hijack your thread but what about trying a similar bike? I am getting a new bike and the Myka is what I am leaning towards based on fit, price and okay I admit looks. They only have a Safire for rental so I am taking that out next week, I know it is a better bike but similar linkage. I just want to see how I like the full suspension after learning on hardtail. I am so confused!
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    182
    That's exactly what I did I was able to find a safire to try out...it was great and now my myka comp is on order! Should be here in a few days! Woo hoo, I can't wait! The Safire is the bomb, but a little out of my price range!
    Let us know if you end up with the myka too!

    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie_Ama View Post
    Mot to hijack your thread but what about trying a similar bike? I am getting a new bike and the Myka is what I am leaning towards based on fit, price and okay I admit looks. They only have a Safire for rental so I am taking that out next week, I know it is a better bike but similar linkage. I just want to see how I like the full suspension after learning on hardtail. I am so confused!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
    Posts
    5,310
    Quote Originally Posted by bluejellybean View Post
    That's exactly what I did I was able to find a safire to try out...it was great and now my myka comp is on order! Should be here in a few days! Woo hoo, I can't wait! The Safire is the bomb, but a little out of my price range!
    Let us know if you end up with the myka too!
    Yeah the Safire is just a little more than I want to spend but I can take it on the trail and the Myka I can only go in the parking lot. I am thinking based on the fit of the parking lot test the Myka will be a dream but I am going to try a Trek Fuel too (my LBS might be able to swing a deal on it but dang it is ugly).
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    182
    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie_Ama View Post
    Yeah the Safire is just a little more than I want to spend but I can take it on the trail and the Myka I can only go in the parking lot. I am thinking based on the fit of the parking lot test the Myka will be a dream but I am going to try a Trek Fuel too (my LBS might be able to swing a deal on it but dang it is ugly).
    Let me know how the Fuel test run was like...I was looking at that one too, but didn't bother taking it out...(yeah, it makes you wonder why they made it baby poop brown...to blend in with the trails?!)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    North Texas
    Posts
    561
    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie_Ama View Post
    Yeah the Safire is just a little more than I want to spend but I can take it on the trail and the Myka I can only go in the parking lot. I am thinking based on the fit of the parking lot test the Myka will be a dream but I am going to try a Trek Fuel too (my LBS might be able to swing a deal on it but dang it is ugly).
    I learned on a Specialized rockhopper hardtail...a fine little bike, I have a Specialized Era FSR that I have had for a little over a year and I LOVE it...and it was worth the five or six years to learn on the hardtail....I fully appreciate my bike!
    I have a friend who rides the Myka, and it works great for her. She loves it. But FOR SURE try it out! Everyone is different.

 

 

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