Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 46
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Posts
    65

    down hill scaredy pants

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Is anyone else afraid going downhill? I am. I get major anxiety when I get speeding down and find my arms burning from pumping brakes. I feel like I'm going to flip over or topple sideways or something is going to run out in front of me and flip me over.
    What will help? I know I need more confidence, and that will come with time. I'm not worried really when I'm on the MTB, but the roadie tires...
    Last edited by hipmama; 05-23-2009 at 05:12 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Limbo
    Posts
    8,783
    No, you're the only one
    see this
    and
    this

    I am the (self-proclaimed) Queen of the Downhill Weenies
    Last edited by Zen; 05-22-2009 at 05:59 PM.
    2008 Trek FX 7.2/Terry Cite X
    2009 Jamis Aurora/Brooks B-68
    2010 Trek FX 7.6 WSD/stock bontrager

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Hampton, VA
    Posts
    18
    I have the same problem. I am new to cycling and I get very nervous going downhill. I'm frantically scanning the ground and convinced I'm going to hit a pebble and go flying towards the ground.

    I made myself go up and down one hill over and over again the other day. It seemed to help a LITTLE, as I didn't brake the whole time after a few . . . but I am still a worry-wart about it.

    Any tips on how to overcome this fear?
    "i believe in pink. i believe that laughing is the best calorie burner. i believe in kissing. i believe in being strong when everything seems to be going wrong. i believe that happy girls are the prettiest girls. i believe that tomorrow is another day and i believe in miracles." --audrey hepburn

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,845
    Quote Originally Posted by Zen View Post

    I am the (self-proclaimed) Queen of the Downhill Weenies
    I will attest that her brakes honk all the way down hills
    Last edited by Cataboo; 05-22-2009 at 06:11 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,845
    Quote Originally Posted by sweetpotatopie View Post
    I have the same problem. I am new to cycling and I get very nervous going downhill. I'm frantically scanning the ground and convinced I'm going to hit a pebble and go flying towards the ground.

    I made myself go up and down one hill over and over again the other day. It seemed to help a LITTLE, as I didn't brake the whole time after a few . . . but I am still a worry-wart about it.

    Any tips on how to overcome this fear?
    I sort of base it on how curvy the road is, how well I know the road, and what's at the bottom of the road... I just let the bike go down hills that last year I rode my brakes all the way down... And I pedal down some hills that I know there's a big uphill at the end...

    If the road is wet and at all curvy, I use my brakes going down the hill... If there's leaves or any chance that I'm going to skid out... I use my brakes. Before I go down curvy hills, I will usually pause and let any traffic behind me go ahead - because if I need to take a turn wide, I don't want to worry about cars in the way.

    When you're riding - don't look at the ground directly in front of you - look a bit ahead, so that if there's something in the road you have time to react.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Beautiful NW or Left Coast
    Posts
    5,645
    really, repetition is the only remedy I know.
    I like Bikes - Mimi
    Watercolor Blog

    Davidson Custom Bike - Cavaletta
    Dahon 2009 Sport - Luna
    Old Raleigh Mixte - Mitzi

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Kansas City metro
    Posts
    66
    I've only gone 22.something down a small hill...can't imagine going down a bigger/steeper one going close to 30! It sounds exhilirating, but terrifying at the same time.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Boulder
    Posts
    589
    My brakes all get a good solid workout! You are not alone. Confidence (miles) in my bike helps, as does repetition of the same hill (you know what's coming and begin to get more comfortable). I'll still never be a 50mph downhill person, and that's ok!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    2,560
    I'm very cautious going down even small hills. In fact, small hills are all I have to work with. No remedies to offer, but I don't think you are alone!

    Pam

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    East-Central Indiana
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by Biciclista View Post
    really, repetition is the only remedy I know.
    +1!! That and plenty of miles so handling skills become second nature, leading to increased confidence. ('Cuz screaming down a hill at 40 mph is too much fun to miss out on, IMO!)
    "If we know where we want to go, then even a stony road is bearable." ~~ Horst Koehler

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Troutdale, OR
    Posts
    2,604
    Are you looking directly in front of your wheel when you are going down? If so, maybe this is the reason why its so scary because you can't react to something on the road or the road itself when it comes into your field of view.

    At 20MPH, I may be looking 100 feet in front. By the time, I'm going 40MPH downhill, I will be looking 300 feet or more ahead. Absolutely no reason to be looking right in front of your wheel! When you are riding on the flat, I don't think you are looking directly in front of your wheel. Chances are pretty good that you are looking way ahead 100 feet maybe 500 feet ahead.

    If I were to go downhill at 40MPH and look at a spot directly in front of my wheel, I'll be a nervous wreck too.

    At higher speed, you need to look further ahead and start reacting to the condition (pot holes, bumps, debris on the road) before you get to there.

    Relax and try to enjoy the reward of climbing hills, that is going downhill .

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    2,033
    A clinic has done wonders for my downhill confidence, as it is quite hard to explain (attempts in the threads Zen linked?)
    It's a little secret you didn't know about us women. We're all closet Visigoths.

    2008 Roy Hinnen O2 - Selle SMP Glider
    2009 Cube Axial WLS - Selle SMP Glider
    2007 Gary Fisher HiFi Plus - Specialized Alias

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    What Smilingcat said. Practice picking your eyes up. I have a friend whose mantra on the motorcycle is "look up 10." Honestly if you're looking at your front wheel, you should be looking up more like 45. But you get the picture. Looking at the ground is a sure way to wind up on it. (Just as target fixating on any obstacle - tree, car, lamp post, etc. - is a sure way to wind up hitting it.)

    I'm told that mountain biking is a great way to improve your descending skills and learn to "look where you want to go" (not just descending, but all the time).
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Albany, NY
    Posts
    65
    I do look ahead, I'm a super scanner so that's not a problem. I guess practice will be the key. I have three big ones near me, one tall, steep winding one, one tall and insane steep, and one long with a little bend, I'm not too bad on the last one.
    Every time I wobble I swear I'm going to go down. I don't even fall much on my bike, so it's not like I'm accident prone. I went clipless last month and had one fall, from a dead stop, and since have navigated path, street, and city riding with no problems.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    1,063
    What they all said...repitition and looking ahead and where you want to go.

    I'm getting better. I can handle about 35mph if I know the road and/or can see that the road surface is in good condition. Otherwise, I ride the brakes and stand in awe at the pros in the peleton that travel those speeds with other riders near by. [[Shudder]]

    I rode on a trip with a woman who skewed to being one of the slowest riders in the group, if not the slowest. That is, until we came down the mountain pass. Nearly everyone rode their brakes on the way down, but not her--she never hit the brakes once. As a former downhill skier she had no fear and blew us all away.

    I'm convinced it is all perception--if you think it is too fast, it is; if you think it is fun, it will be. I'm still working on the latter.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •