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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    361

    Reference Books and a brake question

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    Hi All!! This is my first post on the forum, although I have been lurking around for a couple weeks. My husband and I bought our first bikes since college about a month ago. I got a Trek FX 7.1 (although I REALLY loved the Kona Dew FS, but it was a bit out of my price range)

    My first question is about general maintenance and adjustments. I am a mechanical engineer and very mechanically inclined so I would love to learn how to do most of the work myself. Hubby and I are planning on taking some bike mechanic classes at our lbs. In the meantime, can anyone suggest a maintenance type book?

    Now on to my brake question. My front brakes were squeeling, so I adjust the angle of the pads and that was taken care of. The problem now is that when I use the brakes, one side of the brakes doesn't release when I do and it rubs on the rim. Any ideas on where to start looking to adjust this?

    Thanks!

    Mary

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    355
    Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance is a good one. There are lots of decent ones. Bicycling Magazine makes one fairly general one that we used as our "text book" when I taught mechanics at the United Bicycle Institute, so it would be another decent option.

    If your bikes are V-brakes (I am guessing), then chances are you need to adjust spring tension. You can do so by loosening a little recessed allen bolt (usually 2.5mm size or thereabouts) found on one of the brake arms (sometimes both) usually below the area of the brake shoe to loosen the spring on that arm, or tighten it to increase spring tension for that arm.

    It is a little weird that it happened just after you adjusted the brake shoes. So before doing this, I'd recommend you take a visual look and make sure the top edge of the brake shoe isn't hanging out/snagging on the tire just above the rim. This can happen occasionally, and might make sense if it is related to your brake shoe adjustment. Also, ensure the wheel is seated properly (centered) and securely in the frame. Any deviation can also cause brake shoe rub.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    361
    Thanks so much. I have my bike in my living room right now and I am going to take another look at it. Also, thanks for the book suggestion. I actually picked that one up from the library (on my bike, LOL) today!

    Mary
    Mary
    ~Strong and content, I travel the open road.~



    http://www.the3day.org/goto/mary.aguirre

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,936
    Quote Originally Posted by mraguirre View Post
    Thanks so much. I have my bike in my living room right now
    Do bikes belong anywhere but in the living room?

    Welcome to TE!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    361
    I got the brakes adjusted right...took a spin around the block and all seems well.

    I am fine with the bike in the living room, but I am not sure about the dog, LOL! He is scared to death of bikes, so we have been sitting by it and sniffing (the dog, not me) I have also been riding around in the back yard with the bike. Hopefully he will get a little used to it. He likes to bark and lunge at cyclists and we have been working on that. I would love to have him run with me as I bike, but I am afraid it will be a recipe for an ER visit.

    m
    Mary
    ~Strong and content, I travel the open road.~



    http://www.the3day.org/goto/mary.aguirre

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mesa, Arizona
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by mraguirre View Post
    I got the brakes adjusted right...took a spin around the block and all seems well.

    I am fine with the bike in the living room, but I am not sure about the dog, LOL! He is scared to death of bikes, so we have been sitting by it and sniffing (the dog, not me) I have also been riding around in the back yard with the bike. Hopefully he will get a little used to it. He likes to bark and lunge at cyclists and we have been working on that. I would love to have him run with me as I bike, but I am afraid it will be a recipe for an ER visit.
    m
    I got a dog walker for my mountain bike that attaches to the seat post. it has a spring in it and a short leash on the end you connect your dogs collar or harness to it. It holds your dog out to the side(either) about 2 feet out and if they pull the spring pulls them back and absorbs the pull some. I got one and walked my dog first with it, then slowly rode. check it out.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    N. California
    Posts
    441
    Quote Originally Posted by Grog View Post
    Do bikes belong anywhere but in the living room?

    Welcome to TE!
    Get a little closer-mine is in the bedroom!
    Be yourself, to the extreme!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    979
    I took one too many psych courses in college and ended up with a major so take this with a grain of salt. You could try giving your dog treats when he approaches the bikes (pair it with a bicycle ding for the Pavlovian effect!) and get him to sit or lie at it too so that he doesn't feel so negative about it. Maybe this is something to do just so that he doesn't get so violent when you are walking him and a cyclist flies by.
    Thanks TE! You pushed me half way over!
    http://pages.teamintraining.org/nca/seagull08/tnguyen

 

 

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