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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    50

    Would the Devinci Silverstone Sl 3 be an okay touring bike (credit card touring)?

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    I am looking at this bike to use as a road bike/light touring perhaps. It has ultegra rear derailleurs, tiagra in the front, cassette is HG50 9s 13-25T, crankset= FSA vero Powerdrive 50/34T, tiagra front and back shifters, tektro r310 duaal pivot with adjustable angle brakes.
    I would probably be carrying 20lbs if I was to go touring on it, and it has eyelets. Would it be okay though in the mountains with 20lbs attached (the cassette)?

    Or should I spend a bit more and get the Silverstone Sl4?


    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,936
    It really depends on the size of the mountain and the size of the engine (your ability as a climber). And are you really going to be just carrying 20 lbs?

    If you're going to have any kind of long climbs (more than a few kilometers), in my humble opinion, you should get a triple chainring (AND a cassette that goes to 27). I consider myself a decent climber and I really like to have my triple when I go climb hills in North Vancouver (the Cypress hill climb is 11 km long but I use the triple a lot more than just there). Your legs and especially your knees will thank you for being able to spin, especially on multi-day trips.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    50
    So would the silverstone 4 be adequate for longer hills? It has shimano 105 5600 10 speed 12-25t for a cassette and crankset is fsa gossamer mega exo 50/34t.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikecanada View Post
    So would the silverstone 4 be adequate for longer hills? It has shimano 105 5600 10 speed 12-25t for a cassette and crankset is fsa gossamer mega exo 50/34t.
    I hope it doesn't sound rude, but being "adequate for longer hills" doesn't have very much to do with the make and model of the bike or the luxuriousness of the componentry (105 in this case), and your question cannot be answered by a yes or no.

    It has everything to do with:
    1) The type of hill (what is a "long hill" for me might not be one for you and vice versa), i.e. how long and how steep;
    2) The engine (YOU, your strength, relative to the load you're going to be carrying, how comfortable you are on hills, your experience)
    3) The gearing (in this case the 12-25 cassette and the 50/34 chainring).

    In my previous message, I suggested you get a triple chainring (so NOT a compact double 50/34) and a cassette that goes up to 27 (not a 12-25) in the back. That is based on what I would do if I was going to go touring on a road bike. I consider myself fairly fit and a pretty good hill climber, and I carry no extra weight on my body (and rarely any weight on my road bike). But I like to spin. And I know that over many days one can be hurt by having to pedal gears too big.

    I know a few people that do with a compact double (such as the 50/34 you mention) for long climbs (crossing of the Alps, without any luggage) but they are all men and also pretty strong cyclists.

    So, to try to answer your question: is it adequate for long hills?

    IF:
    - you are very fit, and can keep up with the strongest men on 5 km + hills (5% grade and more), and have knees of steel, and will not go on trips of more than 3-5 days, and will never ever carry more than 15-20 pounds (including the rack, the weight of the panniers, and the content of the panniers), then it is possible that the components on that bike will be adequate.

    - you are reasonably fit but not necessarily capable of leaving the strong men in the dust, and there is a remote possibility that you will carry more than 20 lbs of weight and go for more than three days, then I would recommend that you get a bike with a triple chainring (50/40/30 sort of thing) and a cassette that goes to at least 27 in the back.

    Of course this is also relative to the other uses you intend to make of that bike. If you want to do only one touring trip a year and want to race the rest of the time, the triple would be inadequate.

    **

    If this sounds jibberish jargon to you, perhaps you should visit the late and revered Sheldon Brown's web site for further information before you buy the bike (this section will get you started: http://sheldonbrown.com/gearing/index.html). The chainring and cassette are not parts that are inexpensively changed on bikes (especially the cranks and chainrings) so it's important to make an informed decision... I am giving you some advice here but you should really be making your own mind. Also note that men in bike shops sometimes tend to sell women bikes with too big gears (a regular double, such as a 52/39, and a 11-23 cassette), so informing yourself will be a good way to make a better decision and one that you will not regret. But of course every bike one buys is a learning experience...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    197
    I agree with Grog. I just got my road bike with a compact a few months back. The compact crank might be good if you're going up some shorter hills. But I am having problems going on longer hills. And that's me and my bike! No packs or racks. And I like to think I'm a pretty good at hills since I live in Vancouver and have been commuting on my mtn. bike for the last 12 odd years. But I do wish that I have a triple sometimes just so I can keep up with the boys on those long rides. I can't spin up the hill with the lowest gear (34 front and 28 back). So imagine if you have weight too.

    One thing you might want is to try out a triple and a compact with some extra weight (backpack??). Try some hills (long and gentle and some short and steep). See which one you think you would like more.

    Good Luck! Let us know what you end up getting.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,936
    Just to make sure things are clear:

    Crank sets / Chaingings for road bikes
    Compact double = 50/34 or similar (can be 50/35, for example)
    Regular double = 52/39 or similar (can be 53/40 but I can't imagine the uses for that!)
    Regular road triple = something like 50/40/30

    For mountain bikes and hybrids all the numbers would be lower.

    Touring bikes usually have a triple, and sometimes even a "mountain-style" triple if it's for loaded touring on long distance. (Not applicable to you probably.)


    Further information:
    Weight of a pair of pretty average panniers, empty: 1.6 kg or about 3 pounds
    Weight of a fairly light rack, NOT heavy-duty: 500 g or about 1 pound



    Yes, please keep us posted about what you end up doing!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    50
    Okay. Thanks for information. It should help a lot! I've been also looking at the 09 Giants (Defy), because that has a triple I believe on it. I was just looking at the Devinci too because it's the 08 and marked down...but I guess it might not work as well if I want to do some light touring with it later on.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    50
    But I don't see myself touring with it a lot. I actually would like to do a tour in Europe, in Tuscany Italy, in a couple of years, and that's the only one that I am planning to do.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikecanada View Post
    But I don't see myself touring with it a lot. I actually would like to do a tour in Europe, in Tuscany Italy, in a couple of years, and that's the only one that I am planning to do.
    My sweet partner and I are going to go ride in the Alps next summer, and we're taking our own bikes, but we're also going to have a car. Neither of us has a bike that's appropriate for touring, in my opinion. (He has a carbon fiber racing Trek and I have a small road bike on which I doubt I could fit a rack and panniers anyway.) All I will be carrying on the bike is a Carradice Nelson saddle bag (7 litres capacity) for a light lunch, downhill clothes, and tools. I have a triple and expect to need all the lower gears.

    Think hard before rejecting the Silverstone, especially if it fits you well: if your touring plans are only very distant and foggy, you might be better off with a bike that will fit your needs right now.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    50
    Okay. Thanks for the advice. I guess I could also upgrade the bike to a triple later on. However, the Silverstone is only $150 or so less than the Giant Defy 1 or WSD Avail 1, which has pretty similar components. So I'm not sure which bike to go with yet... but your info definitely helps!
    I heard the alps are definitely harder than Tuscany to ride. It sounds like a lot of fun though! My husband and I want to do a tour of Tuscany, but I think it'll be a couple of years because of school right now.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    403
    I just toured in Austria with my road bike (that has a triple). I consider myself very fit, and I walked her a few times. Those panniers make a huge difference. I would tour again on my bike if I had to, but the first thing I did when I got home was buy a real touring bike (also used for commuting and as a general 'townie').

    Grog: for your trip, be sure to look into Lufthansa. When I flew, I was able to take my bike for free if I only checked one other piece of luggage. I was able to pick up a bike case on craig's list for less than half of what it cost new. Too bad you don't live closer, I would lend you mine...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    50
    Ginny, did you credit card tour? How long were you there for?
    I am considering the triple right now, just because I might need it if I do load it up with a couple of panniers. However, it's not too hilly where I live. Do people go with compact cranks just because it looks better?

    By the way, I was looking at the Giant bikes and there's a difference between the xs and small women's frames in top tube. Would a jump to 51cm from 52.5cm make a big difference? The shop I went to only has a small and would have to special order a xsmall (but then I have to put a payment down). I was thinking of the men's xsmall (ttube=51.5) but then I like the women's short reach shifters on the Avail1.
    I am going to test the bikes again tomorrow and I will let you know if I like the Devinci that much more than the triple crank Giants

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,936
    Quote Originally Posted by bikecanada View Post
    I am considering the triple right now, just because I might need it if I do load it up with a couple of panniers. However, it's not too hilly where I live. Do people go with compact cranks just because it looks better?
    The advantage of a compact is that it has only two chainrings, so there's less shifting involved to reach the higher and lower gears. People who have no experience riding a triple sometimes find them finicky. (I always had a triple so I never noticed.) Compared to the regular double, it also replaces ridiculously high gear options (52X11) that most people don't use all that much, unless they go very very fast down hills, ride in 40kph + pelotons, or time trial, with somewhat easier gearing options (like a 34X25) that will help going up hills.

    By the way, I was looking at the Giant bikes and there's a difference between the xs and small women's frames in top tube. Would a jump to 51cm from 52.5cm make a big difference? The shop I went to only has a small and would have to special order a xsmall (but then I have to put a payment down). I was thinking of the men's xsmall (ttube=51.5) but then I like the women's short reach shifters on the Avail1.
    1.5 cm int he top tube is a BIG DIFFERENCE. Even as little as 1 cm can make the difference between tendonitis and no tendonitis.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
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    Quote Originally Posted by ginny View Post
    Grog: for your trip, be sure to look into Lufthansa. When I flew, I was able to take my bike for free if I only checked one other piece of luggage. I was able to pick up a bike case on craig's list for less than half of what it cost new. Too bad you don't live closer, I would lend you mine...
    Thanks ginny, that's a kind would-have-been offer We're going to France from Canada with Air Canada, on points. (Actually I don't think Lufthansa flies to Canada because it's a member of the same alliance as Air Canada, and going to Frankfurt would be a significant detour!) We already have soft bike bags - for this trip hard cases are not an option because there would be nowhere to put them for us. We're going to roll them and try to convince a Paris friend to keep them at his place while we're out of town!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    50
    Thanks Grog! I will have to try out the Devinci (52 ttube) and maybe think about the Giant Xs Defy1, because that at least is a 51.5 top tube. The Avail 1 in a small (52.5) is slightly too long. The other bike that I tested and liked was the Cannondale 6-13 3...and it had a 51.5cm top tube. The Cannondale is just too expensive for me right now though. That's why I was thinking of the Devinci or Giant Defy 1. However, the Devinci has the compact... do you know anyone that has changed their compact to a triple? Would it cost a lot?

    So how long are you going to Europe for? Are you putting on front and back racks on your road bike? I would love to see pictures later, and I can't wait until I can go tour Italy

 

 

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