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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Delaware
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    528

    Weight of a mtb compared to a Trek hybrid

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    I know very little about the differences in types of bikes so I've come to the experts.

    Can I find a mtb that weighs about the same as my Trek 7.6 FX hybrid? ~20 pounds?

    Is it the suspension system that makes them weigh more, that is, if they do?

    Can I use a mtb for my bad/cold weather commuter bike and will it give me more road stability in bad conditions compared to my hybrid with 700X32 tires?

    Thanks for your input.
    "The important thing is this: To be able at any moment to sacrifice what we are for what we might become." Charles Dubois

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Limbo
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    MTB has a heavier frame to stand up to it's intended use.
    You'll get your stability from changing tires and going for a more agressive tread but you'll increase rolling resistance.
    2008 Trek FX 7.2/Terry Cite X
    2009 Jamis Aurora/Brooks B-68
    2010 Trek FX 7.6 WSD/stock bontrager

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    300
    my trek hybrid is a 7200. My neice's 7.2FX is much lighter than my trek. My new gary fisher wahoo mountain bike feels lighter as well!
    vickie

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    2,033
    Down from about 28 pounds you'll pay about 1000$ extra for every kilo less....

    20 pounds is sub-10kg and that's gonna cost you. Lots. As in Carbon.
    It's a little secret you didn't know about us women. We're all closet Visigoths.

    2008 Roy Hinnen O2 - Selle SMP Glider
    2009 Cube Axial WLS - Selle SMP Glider
    2007 Gary Fisher HiFi Plus - Specialized Alias

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    the dry side
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    4,403
    Quote Originally Posted by alpinerabbit View Post
    Down from about 28 pounds you'll pay about 1000$ extra for every kilo less....

    20 pounds is sub-10kg and that's gonna cost you. Lots. As in Carbon.

    or titanium. I've got a ti singlespeed that weighs in at 21#

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,738
    1. Yes, but it will cost a fortune.
    2. Yes. Hardtails generally weigh less than full-suspension, all other things being equal.
    3. You could and it might, but I'd consider changing the tires or buying a second second of wheels and mounting different tires. I don't know what tires you're running now or how bad "bad conditions" might be (depends on your comfort level), but that will definitely have an influence on tire choices. Personally, if it's snowing, raining hard, or anything resembling ice, I'm driving or taking the bus.

    Something else to consider as you shop: does your MTB have the requisite braze-ons or eyelets to mount your rack(s) and panniers for sloppy-weather commuting? Some will, some will not.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,936
    How exactly do you define "bad/cold weather"?

    How much snow and ice are considering riding on? How much calcium will be on those roads? If any, you may want to consider a "winter bike", i.e. a cheaper bike that you will not be too sad to see quickly deteriorating as you ride through the winter snow-abrasive-calcium slush.

    For stability, you'll be fine with tires with a bit more thread to them. I don't think a mountain bike would give you much of an advantage there, unless you plan on starting to jump over snow piles...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    foothills of the Ozarks aka Tornado Alley
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    4,197
    Pardes, I did a quick check on the tires the 7.6 has--700x28. I would shop for a different tread (like an all-season tire) and possibly go up to a 700x32, if it will clear your brakes. A wider tire will give you a little more stability but may not make much difference in extreme weather conditions.

    Also, mountain bikes are awkward to handle compared to road bikes and I know you load your bike on the bus. Just a thought.....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delaware
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    528
    Great answers! Thanks so much.

    I don't plan to bike for very long (time-wise) on icy/snowy roads but I would still have to get to the bus stop. I have several choices of buses and times but on really bad days the closest bus stop is only 0.7 mile from my house. I would be walking that anyway if I didn't have a bike so I'm going to be "out there" anyway I go.

    I see that mtb is not the way to go from your comments.

    I like Becky's idea of changing out the wheels but I may be limited with the Trek 7.6 FX. As it is now with the tires I have, it's a VERY small distance to the racks.....we are talking millimeters....but maybe with smaller tires???? I see I need to consult Howard at Bikeline to see what can be done with the bike I have.

    I also like Grog's comments. Sure, jumping a snowbank would be a trip! If I can't adapt what I have, you are probably right about getting a cheaper bike that might get very salty coated before our winter is over.

    Thanks again. Now I can start window-shopping and heckling the bike stores.
    "The important thing is this: To be able at any moment to sacrifice what we are for what we might become." Charles Dubois

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    It's not so much size as it is tread.
    32's should be fine.
    Last edited by Zen; 09-12-2008 at 10:50 AM.
    2008 Trek FX 7.2/Terry Cite X
    2009 Jamis Aurora/Brooks B-68
    2010 Trek FX 7.6 WSD/stock bontrager

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    528
    Zen, how much would the extra tread slow me down? In other words would the difference be enough to not consider using the extra tread tires year round? Speed isn't the issue for slowpoke me but road resistance that makes it harder to bike is.
    "The important thing is this: To be able at any moment to sacrifice what we are for what we might become." Charles Dubois

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,715
    Hmm, how much more does the mtb type tread slow you down (and also jarring with suspension w/o a lock out option)...

    A guy in a lbs finally described what I wanted to say about this very thing to a dear GF who wants me to do paved bike paths with her using my mtb...

    "I feel like I'm going no where fast".

    I told the shop guy he nailed it right on the head of how I felt about it too.

    For a mtb I own a Trek wsd 4500 hard trail (only front end suspension and no disc brakes--good stopping power in wet conditions, but heavier brakes).

    About this time last year I think, there was a lovely thread of someone's beautiful "slush queen" bike a lbs built for the gal. She got much "oooo & ahhhh" and was said to be too beautiful for slush. But, her owner said it was her destiny... so be it. I might dig around for the thread. Can you tell she left quite an impression on me as well? Thinking... maybe it would give you some ideas for modifications on how to make what you have work better or something.

    I was thinking you could fix up a cheap beater bike as suggested with those tires. I have a 25yr+ bike in my garage that would make a nice beater bike. But, she's steele... and if you load her on the bus as posted, that could really start to sux pretty quick (she's soooo heavy, much more than my current mtb). Going to search for the "slush queen"...

    EDIT: Below is the link to the thread with the "slush kicker" she was called, not queen... I was pretty close on the wording...

    http://forums.teamestrogen.com/showt...ighlight=slush
    Last edited by Miranda; 09-12-2008 at 11:38 AM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    foothills of the Ozarks aka Tornado Alley
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    Miranda, thanks for that link.

    I'm currently outfitting my '05 Sequoia with a mountain cassette, derailer and bigger tires for my off season riding. I think it's a great idea to have an older bike as a back-up bike for rainy days and such. I hope others enjoy theirs too.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Limbo
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    I bought my FX specifically to use on the C&O Canal.
    If most of my riding was on pavement I wouldn't want these tires year round.
    I rode 20 paved miles of the WMRT and i was working it to maintain a 13mph average.

    If you ride slower or shorter distances it would probably be fine.
    Last edited by Zen; 09-12-2008 at 09:30 PM.
    2008 Trek FX 7.2/Terry Cite X
    2009 Jamis Aurora/Brooks B-68
    2010 Trek FX 7.6 WSD/stock bontrager

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,715
    Quote Originally Posted by sundial View Post
    Miranda, thanks for that link.
    It's such a lovely bike... I could see the pics of it perfectly in my mind before I even found the thread.


 

 

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