Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,715

    1st actual mtb ride

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    I'm primarily a roadie gal, but own a hard trail mtb. I have some back and other health issues that I have to be very careful not to crash. Thus, I have never really sought out any major trails to ride on.

    Well, one of our favorite places to camp got some official mtb trails seperate from paved bike path, and walking trails bikes can use. Holy bageebas... what a difference... and what fun!

    The trail was designed in conjunction with the park and a mtb association as a "beginner level". Some of the drops I felt too unsafe skill wise to do without a major crash, but minor crash and bruises, I did indeed complete the whole loop.

    I asked one of my die hard mtb friends if I could say I was a mtb gal with bruises, and he said "no, one must have scars for that!" ...lol, well, I was pretty proud of myself anyway.

    Ran out of time to do the loop again, but somehow when I left, I just felt the need to ride more... to go back and attempt the things I couldn't before. That was a good feeling considering I was scared to even do it to start. Just wanted to share with my TE cyber friends who I think can relate. M

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Longmont, CO
    Posts
    545
    Congrats!

    Don't worry, if you keep riding your mountain bike, the scars will come =P

    (I kid, I kid! Although I certainly have a nice one on my left elbow ... from a ride at a beginner clinic, of all things!)
    monique

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    151
    Miranda,

    Good deal, I'm new too (since April), just keep riding. I've had a couple great mentors take me out, did a mtb clinic by-women-for-women (highly recommended), and I'm having a blast. Sunday I road the trail by myself, which I found surprisingly very enjoyable vs. a group ride. I didn't feel I was holding anyone up, didn't feel pressured to push my comfort zone and got a whole new perspective of the trail. Then last night, I rode that same trail w/one guy, let him lead and I felt a new confidence. While chasing him, I pushed myself enough to know I was pushing yet feeling very confident. Yet when those freaky fears popped up I brought it back down It was a great ride!

    Oh, and I wear my bruises and scars as merit badges!!! One cracked rib in early May ... bones heal!!

    Keep us updated on your progress!

    PJ

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,715
    Thx ladies. Yes, some sort of clinic would help me I'm sure. I was a bit scared of being injured out alone, but I did like not being rushed. I had a couple sets of guys come up behind me on the trail, and I just pulled off best I could and told them to pass. I thought maybe it was my roadie car sense that said "get over and let those fast moving things go on!".
    Last edited by Miranda; 07-08-2008 at 03:49 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Longmont, CO
    Posts
    545
    It took me a long time to try riding alone. Now, probably 80% or more of my mountain bike rides are alone. I like it a lot -- I don't feel pressured to hurry, and I'm more "in the moment" in a lot of ways. When I'm alone, I make sure I ride trails that are some appropriate mix of "familiar / doable" and "well-populated".
    monique

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    151
    Quote Originally Posted by Miranda View Post
    Thx ladies. Yes, some sort of clinic would help me I'm sure. I was a bit scared of being injured out alone, but I did like not being rushed. I had a couple sets of guys come up behind me on the trail, and I just pulled off best I could and told them to pass. I thought maybe it was my roadie car sense that said "get over and let those fast moving things go on!".
    Miranda,

    At the clinic I went to, it was suggested that we attach a whistle to the shoulder strap of our camelback. That way if you are out alone, fall, and can't even reach around for a cell phone or get cell signal, blowing the whistle will signal someone sooner or later. I thought it a great idea!

    I'm a new rider this year and not very fast rider and tend to be a bit 'brakey' so I've learned as proper trail etiquette to pull over to the right as soon as I can safely on the trail for riders who want to pass.

    PJ
    Last edited by Tabby; 07-09-2008 at 05:22 AM.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •