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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645

    Adapting to the heat

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    I'm tempted to just whine "It's too hot!" But we go through this almost every year the first week of June, when spring days with highs in the 60s and lows threatening frost, suddenly turn into a solid week of humid 93 degree days.

    Someone must have an active strategy to acclimate to the heat. Because mine consists of just sitting around on my butt, counting unavoidable household and yard chores as my workout, until eventually the temperature drops back down for a while, and by the time these temperatures come back around again in July or August, my body's ready for it.

    I like the heat, really I do. Just - not all of a sudden!
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    9,351
    I find if I start off in early in the morning and do something (usually riding ) as the day gets hotter and hotter, it doesn't bother me.

    V.
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    4,556
    I'd love to know too! We went from spring temps to 100+ very suddenly. It's plenty cool in the house, and I still don't feel like doing anything Where'd spring go??
    Most days in life don't stand out, But life's about those days that will...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    VA / DC Metro Area
    Posts
    624
    I could swear it was August right now. This is not normal! I sorta WANT to ride but the oppressive heat wave makes me 2nd guess that idea. I think I may just hit the pool instead. We kept the shades drawn all morning to keep the heat down which is a big difference from yesterday. We're pretty sure the AC has been running constantly since it hit 90+.
    "She who succeeds in gaining the master of the bicycle will gain the mastery of life." -Frances E. Willard
    My Cycling Blog | Requisite Bike Pics | Join the Team Estrogen group at Velog.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    8,548
    heat?
    the way we adjust to the heat is we layer our wool
    so if the temp moves up a few degrees we can peel a layer off.


    seriously, i think the way to adjust to heat is to get up and do stuff and sweat and get over it.
    but what would I know?
    Mimi Team TE BIANCHISTA
    for six tanks of gas you could have bought a bike.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Quote Originally Posted by mimitabby View Post
    seriously, i think the way to adjust to heat is to get up and do stuff and sweat and get over it.
    I keep reading that when temperature in Fahrenheit plus percentage humidity is greater than 150, one shouldn't exercise. I don't really believe that either and I certainly don't practice it, but I'm not really sure it's safe to go out without any adaptation at all. 'S why I asked...

    But if the consensus is it's safe, then tomorrow I'll HTFU
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    9,351
    I'm serious about starting early. Yesterday I rode a 200 K. I started at 6:30 AM. At 2 PM it was 95 degrees out. I knew it was hot, but because I'd been outside as it got hotter, my body had just adjusted.

    V.
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Western Canada-prairies, mountain & ocean
    Posts
    6,982
    Quote Originally Posted by OakLeaf View Post
    I keep reading that when temperature in Fahrenheit plus percentage humidity is greater than 150, one shouldn't exercise. I don't really believe that either and I certainly don't practice it, but I'm not really sure it's safe to go out without any adaptation at all.
    150% humidity....ugh.

    When living in humid summer areas, I used to try to start cycling off no later than 7:00 am. Earlier if possible. I never did understand why more people didn't start biking around 6:30 am on those days on weekends. I lived near and used several bike routes that were well-known in Toronto. At that time, the car traffic would be lower also.

    And finish the ride around 9-10 am.
    I'm a morning person anyway, so it wasn't a painful thing to start off early.

    However, I have done loaded bike touring trips on summer days at 90F @ 100%. By noon, I was gettin' wasted...but sometimes there's no choice but to press onward in order to find a place to sleep and eat supper. It helped pyschologically if there was a slight breeze and some trees lining the route at various intervals along the way.
    Last edited by shootingstar; 06-08-2008 at 01:38 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Atlanta GA
    Posts
    60
    It usually takes me about 2 weeks to adapt to the heat once the thermometer gets above 90. I notice that I canít ride as hard as I can in the cooler weather, or as far. My strategy is to get out there everyday with PLENTY of water and just let my body get used to the heat. I drink much more than I think I need to. Last year this strategy worked for me, and after 2 weeks I was back to my regular strength. Keep an eye out for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke (nausea, headache, muscle cramps, dizziness).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    3,473
    Not everybody can adjust to high heat. Early-early morning rides probably work best for those who have trouble taking heat.
    "My predominant feeling is one of gratitude. I have loved and been loved;I have been given much and I have given something in return...Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and an adventure." O. Sacks

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Uncanny Valley
    Posts
    14,645
    Okay, I'm over it.
    Speed comes from what you put behind you. - Judi Ketteler

 

 

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