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Thread: Chafing

  1. #1
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    Jan 2008
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    Question Chafing

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    I am a fairly new rider and I am having a problem. Because of the weather here, I am on a trainer on my tri bike. My labia and clitoris are RAW. Not really sure if a chamois butter will help this. I am planning on doing my first Tri in June and would really like to resolve this problem. Please help

  2. #2
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    If you do a search, this topic has been talked about many times. To put it mildly... Most likely, you need to adjust your saddle and possibly other bike components. You are sitting on parts that ought not be sat on while riding. You should not be leaning forward on that area. You should be sitting on your ischial tuberosities. (sit bones) Here are a few threads that have dealt with this issue. The best advice is usually... get a professional fit done and if needed, change saddles. Good luck.

    http://forums.teamestrogen.com/showthread.php?t=20938
    http://forums.teamestrogen.com/showthread.php?t=20493
    http://forums.teamestrogen.com/showthread.php?t=16527
    http://forums.teamestrogen.com/showthread.php?t=14487
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  3. #3
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    use a small carpenter's level to see if your seat is level horizontally. If it dips down to the front, put a phone book under the front wheel to make the seat level. They also sell front wheel lifts for trainers.

    But do look at all the other threads on this topic. Saddle, bike fit, etc., etc.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xrayted View Post
    .......You are sitting on parts that ought not be sat on while riding. You should not be leaning forward on that area. You should be sitting on your ischial tuberosities. (sit bones)....
    Unfortunately on a TT or Tri bike this can be more difficult to acheive as you are in a position that is intentionally leaning far forward (onto aerobars). Many people who can tolerate and even like a non-cut out saddle on their regular road bike find that it is necessary on their TT bike. It is possible to be comfortable on a TT/Tri setup, you just may have to work at it a little harder and remember that any bike on a trainer is harder on your bits than being out on the road. If your wokout is long, take some breaks - get off and walk around - if you can't get off at least stand up out of the saddle every once in a while, sit up with your hands on the tops of bars during rest intervals, etc, get the get the blood flowing and rearrange your sitting position a bit.
    Last edited by Eden; 01-21-2008 at 02:15 PM.
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  5. #5
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    Jan 2007
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    I would not recommend using chamois creams up in that region -- that's all mucous membrane territory & very absorbent. You will also feel you need to wash the area more scrupulously afterwards with soap, which will only dry it out & irritate it more, a vicious cycle.

    You should always try a saddle in a level position first, but if it is putting too much pressure on you don't be afraid to tilt. The basic guidelines would be too much pressure in front, tilt the nose down, and too much pressure in back, tilt the nose up.

    If all else fails, the saddle might just be wrong for you. At least you have lots of time between now & June to find the right one for you.

  6. #6
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    Just seconding the "tilt" suggestions. I could not ride either of my bikes if the seats were horizontal to the ground.

    My TT bike seats nose is tilted much more towards the ground than my road race bike because the front end is much lower.

    I am also experimenting with angling my seats to the left or the right because of swelling to the right of my labia (not the labia itself). I am seeking the right saddle position or the right saddle (see this thread - it describes my similar "symptoms" to yours though not as extreme)
    http://forums.teamestrogen.com/showthread.php?t=20637


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by koala View Post
    I would not recommend using chamois creams up in that region -- that's all mucous membrane territory & very absorbent. You will also feel you need to wash the area more scrupulously afterwards with soap, which will only dry it out & irritate it more, a vicious cycle.

    You should always try a saddle in a level position first, but if it is putting too much pressure on you don't be afraid to tilt. The basic guidelines would be too much pressure in front, tilt the nose down, and too much pressure in back, tilt the nose up.

    If all else fails, the saddle might just be wrong for you. At least you have lots of time between now & June to find the right one for you.
    Actually, the tilt you use will also depend on the type of saddle you use. I've found that with a cut-out saddle, if I tilt it up, as counter-intuitive as it may sound, it will relieve pressure on the soft tissue in the front and not put undue pressure on the hands/arms/shoulders/neck.

    I personally ride a level saddle, but I occasionally fit clients with an upward tilt.

  8. #8
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    Lots of good suggestions. Another thing to consider is that the saddle may be too high. When it is too high you rub your girlie bits across the top with every pedal stroke which can give you exactly the symptoms you are experiencing. Try lowering it, even slightly and see if that helps.

  9. #9
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    Red face

    Thanks for the help. I have never been fitted for my bike professionally. Seems as if the tip of the seat was down to far. Adjusted and made level. WOW, what a difference.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by koala View Post
    I would not recommend using chamois creams up in that region -- that's all mucous membrane territory & very absorbent. You will also feel you need to wash the area more scrupulously afterwards with soap, which will only dry it out & irritate it more, a vicious cycle.
    PL, hopefully fitting has resolved your issues, but many of us DO depend on chamois creams. Here is my review of Beljum Budder which I tried for the first time today. http://forums.teamestrogen.com/showt...070#post283070

  11. #11
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    I don't think I'd use Chamois butter on the girly bits - I use astroglide - yep the stuff for lubrication - it seems to work pretty good. I do use chamois butter for the outer nether regions, but not the inner nether regions!

    Good luck!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flybye View Post
    I don't think I'd use Chamois butter on the girly bits - I use astroglide - yep the stuff for lubrication - it seems to work pretty good. I do use chamois butter for the outer nether regions, but not the inner nether regions!

    Good luck!
    OK so this is probably a dumb question. why would one use chamois butter? The only 'chafing' i get as such is from one pair of shorts on the top of my thigh where the chamois is stitched in to the leg. I only wear those if we are behind in washing & I have nothing else. Like only worn twice all summer long.

    I'm reading this thread b/c about 4 months ago I got a couple of what I'd have described as ingrown pubic hairs - then it all went crazy. I got this huge zit that was a big as a marble. (Gross moment - sorry) squeezed all the muck out, used tea tree oil on it after every shower, it went away. Every 3-4 weeks comes back again - same spot. Now no longer mucky but a hard bump. Would using chamois butter help this heal & stay away. I've had my bike fitted, use a women's saddle, very rarely get uncomfortable on it, tried different brand of more expensive shorts, get out of hot shorts ASAP & shower. So now looking for other options before going in to LBS & asking questions when the whole staff are guys

    thanks
    Last edited by nomummytummy; 02-02-2008 at 01:37 AM.

  13. #13
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    If you're not chafing there's no reason to use lube!

    Anyway, lubes would probably make your clogged pores worse. I used to get those when I was using A&D. Try hot sitz baths, maybe. And search in the Health threads for discussions of cysts and saddle sores.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by velogirl View Post
    Actually, the tilt you use will also depend on the type of saddle you use. I've found that with a cut-out saddle, if I tilt it up, as counter-intuitive as it may sound, it will relieve pressure on the soft tissue in the front and not put undue pressure on the hands/arms/shoulders/neck.

    I personally ride a level saddle, but I occasionally fit clients with an upward tilt.
    I've had this experience with fitting people as well and it seems to be because the cutouts have less support on the sides where the cut out is, this tend to compress making the rider slide forward as if they are on a down tilted saddle. Older saddles are worse for this. I ended up going away from cut outs myself for this reason.

    I agree with what everyone else has said here about tilt/fit etc. And it is possible to get reasonably comfortable on a tri bike for outdoor riding. But there is a big difference between riding a bike in a time trial effort and riding a bike inside on a trainer. The actual pressing down on the pedals at high effort, lifts you up a bit and creates a less than full weight bearing experience. A Tri/TT bike is almost always uncomfortable to some degree in this area. I would suggest finding a cheaper road bike, used maybe for your trainer bike as well as getting your tri bike fitted better.
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  15. #15
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    If you're getting ingrown hairs, chamois butter might help prevent those. It will not block the pores because it's water based and comes off easily, but A & D WILL block pores. I tried A & D one summer and got big pore infections; my doc, who is a cyclist, said it was blockage from the A & D.
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