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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
    Posts
    5,310

    What the??? My tire blew out!

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    Am I wrong to assume this is the tire and not user error?

    When it comes to tires, it is the only area of maintenance I consider myself good at. About 700 miles ago I put some Maxxis Detonators on my bike and was thoroughly impressed with the feel plus they are supposed to be flat resistant.

    Yesterday, 31 miles into a 80 mile ride my tire blew out! We booted the tire, aired it back up and road 4 miles back to the nearest town. My parents came to get us as the tire was not going to make it. The aired up tire had bulges on the top and bottom in an S-pattern. My husband's tire now looks exactly the same. I could believe one tire was maybe put on improperly and the bead didn't seat right but not two. We are using the recommended PSI of 120. The only thing I can think of that wouldn't be completely the tire is it has been in the 90's here, maybe we should use a lower PSI? I don't see why though.

    Maxxis said they will take about 2 weeks to review a warranty claim, so now I have to go buy TWO replacement tires. You can bet those will not be Maxxis. I have put 1,500+ on all my tires prior to this and put about 3,000 on my last Gatorskins.
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Posts
    1,935
    sounds like a defect to me.....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Northern Utah
    Posts
    14
    The Maxxis Courchevels seem to be doing that too.....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
    Posts
    9,684
    Weeellll, first of all 120 PSI is the max pressure, not the recommended pressure. Two very different things.

    http://www.maxxis.com/shop_maxxis/co...l&product_ids=

    Also going to ask if you've checked your pressure with a dedicated air pressure gauge. One of our floor pumps was 10 PSI too high. Yeow.
    Last edited by SadieKate; 08-23-2007 at 03:04 PM.
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    3,867
    I tell ya, we had one of those Ford Explorers that had all the tire problems? You know, back in the 90s? Well, we never could get a good tire for that vehicle after the initial Firestone disaster. The tire issues kept spreading and spreading to different manufacturers.

    I think it's very possible that your tires are defective and there are probably more out there. I'm very skeptical of tire quality in general these days.

    Karen

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Top of Parrett Mountain, Oregon
    Posts
    453
    I had a blowout yesterday. The tire was pretty new, only about 300 miles on it, so maybe 2-3 weeks old.

    It wasn't a defective tire. There is a lot of gravel on the road, spillover from gravel driveways and gravel side roads, and maybe trucks carrying gravel. I am out in the hills coming down on the descents, and my tires hit the large pieces of gravel, just a few of them, but the rocks break and come up and cut right through the sidewall.

    Yesterday I was lucky in that the blowout happened only three miles from my house. I put a new tube in and put the wheel back on so I could push the bike. I live on top of a small mountain so I had a steep three mile climb home, walking and pushing the bike up the mountain.

    It is the second time my sidewalls have been cut that way. Earlier this month I was on a long ride into the Cascades with Suzie. We had a steep continuous eight mile descent coming down out of the mountains. About every half mile there was a road sign that proclaimed "Caution Loose Gravel on Road." Yes, it was an asphalt road, but there was really a lot of loose gravel over the entire surface, and I really had to ride my brakes to keep my speed down to 25-30 because of the danger due to the gravel. I got my sidewall cut, but didn't get a flat. That is why the blowout tire was so new.

    Darcy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    983

    Talking What the???

    WOW! that's a bummer to have two tires do that! Although things certainly do happen , it's hard to imagine that two tires would do the same thing... so it will be interesting to see what Maxxis does. Personally, I run Maxxis tires and have had no problems... in fact have been riding them for two years( Corchevals..several pair by this time). I also have several customers that are running them as well, and have seen no problems, so I wouldn't hesitate to buy them again.Regardless, hopefully you will get some answers soon.

    Keep us posted!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Sierra Foothills, CA
    Posts
    801
    Hmmm, this is interesting. I hit gravel, chunks of rock, sticks, cruddy pavement, etc. on my rides all the time. I've got about 1,800 miles on the Bontrager Selects that came on my Trek 1000. Should I be replacing these tires? They still look good to me, but I don't know anything! And I'd rather not have a blowout (knock on wood)!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Riding my Luna & Rivendell in the Hudson Valley, NY
    Posts
    8,409
    We should be careful when discussing these things to not confuse TUBE blowouts/flats with TIRE cuts and failures, etc.

    Also, when comparing experiences, do state your tire size and width. Narrow tires (700x23 for example) tend to get flats and cuts more easily than wider (700x28 for example) tires, especially on sharp gravel. Also, a rider 50 pounds heavier might get more flats, blowouts, or cuts than a lighter rider, especially on skinny tires, since they are adding substantial additional pressure downwards on the tire while riding. Thin racing tires tend to be problematic on rough gravel roads, and most go-fast road riders I know avoid gravel roads because they get tired of having flats all the time. Kevlar lined tires do help prevent tire cuts and punctures.

    And SadieKate is right- when the sidewall says "max. psi 120" that means if you inflate higher than that you risk a blowout....it does NOT mean that 120 is the recommended pressure! One will get more tire/tube failures with EITHER too high a pressure or too low a pressure.
    My 700x28 Pasela Panaracer Kevlar-lined tires say max. 120 psi, but I put them at between 90-100. I ride on incredibly sharp rocky gravel roads (even over cow fields on occasion!), and in 4,000 miles I've only had one flat- due to a triangular piece of glass that got imbedded in my tire.

    All that said....my DH had 3 blowout tube flats in a row 2 months ago...we ran out of tubes and patch kits finally and I had to ride home to get the car and rescue him. At first we thought it must be faulty tubes- but no, between his tubes and mine they were actually 3 different brands of tube, and all new! He finally figured out he was somehow getting the tube pinched in the rim near the valve each time he put a new tube in- some subtle little thing about his technique, he said. It's not happening anymore, so he must have improved his flat changing technique.
    Lisa
    Our bikes...OurBikes...and my mountain dulcimer blog
    Ruby's Website and My blog
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Posts
    1,935
    what happened to me:
    I was on a century (the Windmill in Santa Maria) and heard a rhythmic thumping. I thought I had run over some bubble gum. after 10 miles. I stopped and took a look. I had bugle on both the left AND right side of the tire in a S pattern. These were New Specialized Mondos. Max 120, I ran them at 110. Ironically the sag driver was the local Specialized dealer. I got a new tire.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    830
    It's my understanding that hitting potholes or rough railroad tracks can actually break some of the fibers in the tire and eventually it gets weak enough that the tube will cause it to bulge and then fail (blowout).
    As we must account for every idle word, so must we account for every idle silence." ~Benjamin Franklin

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    somewhere between the Red & Rio Grande
    Posts
    5,310
    I think I understand tube vs. tire blowing....

    This tire actually separated after bulging in a S-Shape. Now it and my husband's tire look very comparable to a tire blowing out on the car. I wish I had more detailed photos that I sent to MAXXIS. Would a tube blowing out cause the fibers to separate and why would my husband's be doing the same without the tube blowing? It seems like my tube blew after the tire separated, not the tire separated because the tube blew. I can admit user error or bad luck, but it truly appears to be a design flaw.

    I personally like the feel of my tire at approx 115 PSI (I am not crazy about the softer ride of 100 PSI) and I have never been advised that this is a problem. Although, I do not have a dedicated guage as Sadie recommended, so over inflation is possible.

    Prior to these tires my flats were few and far between. I average 100+ miles a week and have not had this problem, in fact this was only my 3rd flat in the past year and both of the others were punctures on soft tires that came on the bike. These tires were purchased because MAXXIS states they are puncture resistant and I thought they would not be quite as heavy as the Gator Skins I used to ride.

    MAXXIS is currently reviewing our warranty claim and hopefully they will be able to replace the tires. If they say it is our fault, that is okay too- we already are running brand new tires on our rear wheels.
    Amanda

    2011 Specialized Epic Comp 29er | Specialized Phenom | "Marie Laveau"
    2007 Cannondale Synapse Carbon Road | Selle Italia Lady Gel Flow | "Miranda"


    You don't have to be great to get started, but you do have to get started to be great. -Lee J. Colan

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Tigard, OR
    Posts
    439
    Quote Originally Posted by Lisa S.H. View Post

    And SadieKate is right- when the sidewall says "max. psi 120" that means if you inflate higher than that you risk a blowout....it does NOT mean that 120 is the recommended pressure! One will get more tire/tube failures with EITHER too high a pressure or too low a pressure.
    My 700x28 Pasela Panaracer Kevlar-lined tires say max. 120 psi, but I put them at between 90-100. I ride on incredibly sharp rocky gravel roads (even over cow fields on occasion!), and in 4,000 miles I've only had one flat- due to a triangular piece of glass that got imbedded in my tire.
    There is no real consensus about this. The number on your sidewall was invented by a lawyer who wanted to be an engineer but couldn't pass calculus. It generally includes a significant safety factor so they don't get sued as often.

    There are a lot of things that determine the point at which your tire will fail. I run my front tire at or a little above recommended pressure and my rear tire almost dead on and my last sidewall failure was in 1993.

    I suspect that skill plays into it somehow. More experienced riders can generally float their bikes over bumps and tend to avoid things that will shred their tires. Or they just get sick of flats, spend the extra money and get really good tires.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Top of Parrett Mountain, Oregon
    Posts
    453
    Quote Originally Posted by boy in a kilt View Post

    I suspect that skill plays into it somehow. More experienced riders can generally float their bikes over bumps and tend to avoid things that will shred their tires. Or they just get sick of flats, spend the extra money and get really good tires.
    Hey, c',mon, not true! I can completely wear out a tire and not get a flat, and I've gone through a lot of wornout tires on my road bike. I've only gotten one flat and one blow-out, and one tire that was almost a blow-out from the sidewalls being cut.

    I get biking into new territory and anything goes. The most dangerous areas for me is when the talls trees alongside the road (this is Oregon) dapples shade onto the asphalt right when the sun is in a specific position in the sky, plus I am on a steep descent, and I can't see the potholes, cracked asphalt and chunks of rock in the road until I am right there because it is all hidden in the shade.

    Or last weekend, me and the biking buddies were going down a long steep descent on a route new to us, and we were all going pretty fast, and wow, right there, spread all across the paved shoulder of the road was a huge mound of blue shattered glass, a color that was not visible to us from a distance. We managed to avoid that hazard, but I can see where other cyclists might not see it in time.

    I carry a spare tube AND a spare tire with me. Problem solved.

    Darcy

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,559
    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie_Ama View Post
    I think I understand tube vs. tire blowing....

    This tire actually separated after bulging in a S-Shape. Now it and my husband's tire look very comparable to a tire blowing out on the car. I wish I had more detailed photos that I sent to MAXXIS. Would a tube blowing out cause the fibers to separate and why would my husband's be doing the same without the tube blowing? It seems like my tube blew after the tire separated, not the tire separated because the tube blew.
    In general, tubes don't blow out when completely encased in an intact tire. Tubes blow because the tire fails, suddenly allowing the tube to expand beyond its capacity. [Possible exception for defective or ultralight tubes.]
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
    1980 Columbus Frame with 1970 Campy parts
    1954 Raleigh 3-speed/Brooks B72

 

 

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