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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    254

    Tricks for loosening too tight hex bolts?

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    or is it nuts? I am trying to change pedals on a bike and it has a hex bolt (or niut) (I am so not mechanical) - I got one off - but I cannot get the the other off _ I am turning it the correct way. Should I try liquid wrench or something? Hex wrench slips out, I have cut up my right hand and am about to just beat the old pedal with a hammer. I have been trying to get this pedal off for a couple of hours and am frustrated and a little bloody. Thanks for a place to rant and thanks for any suggestions.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    I'm the only one allowed to whine
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    10,576
    Ummm, don't they turn one way on the left pedal, and the other way on the right pedal?

    I recall a mnemotic someone posted "Back off, forward onward." Then you don't have to worry about which way which one goes.

    As you face the pedal, you turn toward the back of the bike to get the pedal off.

    Edit: OOPS, nevermind... I reread your post and you said you are turning it the right way. I guess I'd tried some liquid wrench. Or maybe use a pipe extension to give you more leverage?
    Last edited by KnottedYet; 06-03-2007 at 08:24 PM.
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    north central North Dakota
    Posts
    29
    Could you post a photo of your problem pedal? Liquid wrench is ok to use if you have a rusty thread problem, but, you must let it soak into the parts overnite.Are you using a hex key or an open ended wrench? Don't grab the hammer just yet.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    254
    I am using a hex key - (I think - a 5-6 inch piece of metal that has about an 11/2 inch bendy part so that it looks like a tall L). I agree about the hammer - it would just be satisfying until I wrecked something. The reason I think I am right aobut the turning is that I read about it on the park tools site and I am turning in the opposite direction of what I did to get the first one off. I don't think it is rusty - just overtightened - it is my dahon folding bike - and just about every bolt has been over tightened. so much so that there are complaints about it on their website. I may just have to take it bike shop tomorrow. It is not really a problem except that I hate to take them things that I can do myself - like changing pedal (unless one won't come off) Thanks
    Last edited by farrellcollie; 06-03-2007 at 08:54 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    north central North Dakota
    Posts
    29
    Is the key slipping inside the hexhead?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    254
    It slips out - I am kind of concerned about stripping it - I don't know if this is a concern with these type of bolts - but I have done it to too tight screws.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    north central North Dakota
    Posts
    29
    If everything is still tight (key in head) and you say that most all your bolts in you bike were orvertorqued,AND you are ABSOLUTELY POSITIVE that you are turning in the correct direction then we go to a cheater.Find a pipe or crescent wrench to slip over end of wrench to gain a longer handle to twist that little bugger out.There is a risk that something could break but its nothing an electric drill and a good bit wouldn't take care of. It wouldn't hurt to apply a little liq,wrench to threads anyway. Regards, Frank

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    north central North Dakota
    Posts
    29
    I don't think I'm much help.If the head of the bolt is exposed ,then a vice-grip wrench tool could be used to loosen it. This little pain in the pedal is lookin like a job for the wrench pro.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    2,559
    Quote Originally Posted by farrellcollie View Post
    I am using a hex key - (I think - a 5-6 inch piece of metal that has about an 11/2 inch bendy part so that it looks like a tall L).
    That's a really short wrench for removing a pedal. Pedal wrenches are typically 10-14 inches long. See if you can buy a longer allen wrench, or find a way to extend the length of what you have, perhaps with a piece of pipe.
    Oil is good, grease is better.

    2007 Peter Mooney w/S&S couplers/Terry Butterfly
    1993 Bridgestone MB-3/Avocet O2 Air 40W
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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    I'm the only one allowed to whine
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    The only kind of pedal I've ever changed is the kind where you unscrew the part right next to the crank (between the crank arm and the pedal). It's a rather narrow space, and the flat head of a pedal wrench just fits into it and grips the pedal axle quite firmly.

    The guys at the LBS recommended an extra-long handled pedal wrench, which I'm glad I bought. It takes some serious leverage to get the pedal axle started. My wrench is probably about a foot and a half long.

    There is no way I could get a pedal off with just the leverage of a hex key! I salute you for getting one off!!
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    254
    Thanks for all of the input-it was helpful. I had never seen this kind with the hex nut rather than needing a pedal wrench - which I have - I was mystified at first until I found out about the hex thing - then it took awhile to remove the first pedal.(when it finally came loose - I was absurdly proud). The pedal I can't get off is on the right side - so I am also manuevering around other things and cannot get as much leverage (how I lost some flesh). And my hand is rather sore from the hex key. Off to the LBS. I look like I have been through some kind of battle between my hand and several bruises from where I got whacked with the pedals whipping around at me. I have changed pedals on other bikes without this much drama.
    Last edited by farrellcollie; 06-04-2007 at 05:59 AM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    983

    Talking Tricks for loosening too tight hex

    Although your pedals can be taken off with a hex wrench, as Deb mentioned, you should really be using a pedal wrench. Not only does the pedal wrench give you more leverage, but it won't slip as you keep mentioning. If a pedal wrench won't fit, ( as on some pedals they don't) try using a socket for added leverage.

    Good lucK!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Utah, Gateway to Nevada, not to be confused with Idaho
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    1,872
    Quote Originally Posted by ridebikeme View Post
    Although your pedals can be taken off with a hex wrench, as Deb mentioned, you should really be using a pedal wrench.
    I'll respectfully say that you can't always use a pedal wrench. I have this very same problem right now (only way the pedals will come off is with a hex from the inside of the crankarm; there is nowhere to use a pedal wrench). I decided to just take it to the shop and have them do it...that way if anything gets damaged, they have to fix it! I'm still cursing the original shop that built the bike (and cussing at myself too for not noticing it until recently, when I wanted to switch to a lighter pedal).

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    983

    Talking Tricks for loosening..

    Umm... I can picture you having Shimano pedals? Have you tried using the socket wrench on the inside of the crank arm? I agree with you, wish that they had not changed their design... but it's all about that "Q" factor.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    254
    I was just not strong enough to do it with the hex wrench. Also - this was the kind of pedal that a pedal wrench does not work on - bike shop used hex wrench too. except when they did it no one got bloody or bruised. These were folding pedals for a folding bike - I never fold it so I wanted campus pedals so I could clip in or not depending on the situation.

    I like my folding bikes - but would never recommend a dahon to others because of all the propriatary parts - and some are just weird. My Downtube (now confiscated by partner who, after a year of cajoling, finally tried it and loved it and is calling it her bike now) is much easier to deal with and has been no trouble at all. The dahon has been a nightmare.
    Last edited by farrellcollie; 06-04-2007 at 12:57 PM.

 

 

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