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  1. #1
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    Road Rash Complications - Options Now?

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    I've seached the topic and found nothing.

    As I've posted, I had a wipe out on Tuesday. I'm allergic to neosporin, and used Bactracin...thinking it was different. Duh! If it looks like a duck...

    Anyway, now I've got an allergic reaction and my road rash has festering blisters. Here's a nasty picture of it:

    http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y16...g/100_0863.jpg

    You can see the excessive redness and within that, is where the welts, blisters and itchiness resides. Reality is that the road rash isn't that bad, but the allergic reaction is unbearable.

    So, I've discontinued the offensive ointment and am using Johnson & Johnson First Aid cream (which I know I can tolerate).

    The question is how do I deal with the allergic reaction to expedite healing?

    My preference is to use something topical because I don't like the side effects of something like Benadryl...

    Thoughts anyone?
    If you don't grow where you're planted, you'll never BLOOM - Will Rogers

  2. #2
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    Well, if it gets any worse... go to a Dr.

    Otherwise, you should probably just leave it alone and let your body heal itself since you are allergic to stuff.

    Give it air when you can.

    Sorry about your wipe out man.
    "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather, to skid in broadside thoroughly used-up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: WOW WHAT A RIDE!!!!"

  3. #3
    Jolt is offline Dodging the potholes...
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    I agree with KSH about getting it checked out if it gets any worse and being careful what else you put on it. If the allergic symptoms are really bad, and keeping you awake at night, it might not be a bad idea to take the Benadryl a little before you go to bed (and then the side effect of drowsiness isn't an issue). As for giving it air, wounds actually heal better when you keep them covered and moist.

    EDIT: If you've stopped using the offending ointment and made sure you got it all cleaned off, the reaction should hopefully go away fairly soon.
    2011 Surly LHT
    1995 Trek 830

  4. #4
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    epsom salts bath?

    go to a first aide clinic, what are they called? (sigh) they are everywhere, and open on saturday.

    But that leg really looks like it needs a soaking. I'm no doctor. strictly my opinion.
    Mimi Team TE BIANCHISTA
    for six tanks of gas you could have bought a bike.

  5. #5
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    Just got back from the pharmacy and I looked at the pharmacist like she was crazy when she said that you can use benadryl ointment on an open wound...so I'm trying it now with dressings to keep it moist...
    If you don't grow where you're planted, you'll never BLOOM - Will Rogers

  6. #6
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    well, good luck. definitely keep it moist. The moister it is the faster the cells that repair the skin can move.
    Mimi Team TE BIANCHISTA
    for six tanks of gas you could have bought a bike.

  7. #7
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    I have two suggestions
    hydrocortizone cream (I once saw a suggestion that it might be good for saddle sores, and it doesn't hurt putting it on them, though I've never tried it on something as large as road rash)
    or diaper cream - desitin or zinc oxide - I would think that should be more than safe to use on weepy, blistered skin and soothing too.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

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  8. #8
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    Also try soaking in a bath with a handful of sea-salt thrown in. That was the best advice I was given after having my son by my midwife. Helps the healing process and keeps the wound clean.
    There are a lot of unwanted, unloved bikes out there - go on give a bike a good home

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eden View Post
    I have two suggestions
    hydrocortizone cream (I once saw a suggestion that it might be good for saddle sores, and it doesn't hurt putting it on them, though I've never tried it on something as large as road rash)
    or diaper cream - desitin or zinc oxide - I would think that should be more than safe to use on weepy, blistered skin and soothing too.
    I wouldn't use hydrocortisone cream as that's intended for skin irritations like eczema etc. and has the unwelcome side-effect of making the skin thinner.

    Perhaps the best thing really would be to let a doctor have a look at the road rash Mr Silver and explain that you have allergies. I take it that you are allergic to Penicillin? If so, me too.
    There are a lot of unwanted, unloved bikes out there - go on give a bike a good home

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Python View Post
    I wouldn't use hydrocortisone cream as that's intended for skin irritations like eczema etc. and has the unwelcome side-effect of making the skin thinner.
    We can only get a really, really weak solution over the counter here in the US - 1% - so though they don't suggest using it continuously or for very extended periods of time, its generally accepted to be safe and non skin thinning in the short term.
    "Sharing the road means getting along, not getting ahead" - 1994 Washington State Driver's Guide

    visit my flickr stream http://flic.kr/ps/MMu5N

  11. #11
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    My experience with road burn was a lesson in patience...keep it clean, give it air, and be patient. And eat well and stay hydrated.

    If you want to try something holistic to ease the allergic reaction, you might want to try Ester-C. It's a buffered vitamin C you can take in a higher dose without affecting your stomach, and it does a darn good job in warding off my respiratory allergic reactions, so it might help with your healing. It can't hurt....you can get it at any pharmacy.

    Good luck!

  12. #12
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    Well misery loves company so if it's any consolation your road rash looks just like everyone else's... see this link for comparison:

    http://www.bravesoldier.com/1/caring_rr.php

    Warning - not for the squeamish. This link takes you one click away from actual photos.

    So, I'd still try the Brave Soldier route, but if you can't find it locally, and don't want to wait for mail order, there are lots of antiseptic creams out there. Read the label to make sure you are not getting bacitracin or neomycins in the ingredients. (Note - these are not in the Brave Soldier product either)

    I personally had excellent success and NO SCARRING by using Spenco 2nd Skin dressings. You absolutely HAVE to keep the rash moist and covered. The dressing will do that. There are all kinds of adhesive and paper tapes out there you can use to hold them on so if one bothers you, or doesn't stick so well you can try another. I had to butt 2 dressings together because I did not know or think to ask if I could get larger pads, but it worked so well even though it was a little extra work to care for the wounds that in the end I didn't care. I used the dressings for about 10-14 days, can't remember. Probably paid close to $200 in wound care supplies during the period, which at the time seemed a lot for glorified band aids, but in the end, was worth every cent.

    http://www.spenco.com/images/pdf/SportSkinCare.pdf

    A quick search on "Road rash treatment" showed a concensus on the moist covered dressing; here's a link for a typical report:

    http://www.bicyclesource.com/body/fi...reatment.shtml

    As far as the allergic reaction - it will probalby clear up in a day or two. If it gets worse or infected see a doctor. You could try the benadryl cream, or spray (I think it's kind of sloppy), and take a benadryl tablet at night if it's really bothersome.

    But I am pretty sure if you do the moist dressing you will get a LOT of fast relief from both the allergic reaction, and continued benefits on the road rash healing. Unless you are allergic to the components in the dressing. Some say they are hypo-allergenic so I think you'd be safe but was not able to see the ingredients in a quick search.

    I am not a doctor (but my father was) but I have survived lots of cuts, burns, road rash, and serious allergic reactions (skin and otherwise) and I speak from experience. No, I'm not accident prone, but when you do a lot of stuff you get a lot more opportunity to have accidents.

    Good luck.
    Martha

  13. #13
    Kitsune06 Guest
    Mr. Silver,
    I 2nd Jolt, actually, in that though everyone says 'give it air' wounds heal faster when kept moist and clean. I'd use a very gentle soap and *gently* clean the entire area to get rid of whatever neosporin remains (it has a petroleum base, so will probably 'stick' well) then use mild sea-salt/warm water soaks (1/4 tsp salt to 1c warm water, any stronger will dry the wound too much) followed by a cool water rinse, then use the 1st aid ointment of choice and some gauze.

    I had something similar on my knee, deep, deep gouges, pebbles and debris embedded, etc... I used the waterproof bandages (the ones w/ the clear sort of skin around them) and changed them out regularly w/ antiseptic cream... healed quickly but still left a scar...

    please keep us updated...
    ~Aryn

  14. #14
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    Mr. Silver, I'd suggest making a trip to your local urgent care facility. Wounds that are red and ugly (no offense) need more than just a topical cream. Please have a doctor take a look at it just to be on the safe side. The last thing you want is for that infection to get into your blood stream.

    Take care and I hope you heal quickly.
    Marcie

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Sierra Foothills, CA
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    Ouch! I sure hope your leg heals quickly! It looks very painful!!!!!!!

    Cortisone Cream or Ointment just on the blistered part might help. Not sure I'd put it on the open wound area though. You poor thing. A trip to Urgent Care may not be a bad idea...they could probably give you something stronger than just an over-the-counter cream and it might do the trick.

    Good luck!

 

 

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