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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    305

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    gosh the pannier looks big - but I would much rather have that on the bike than on my back. my boyfriend seems to cringe when i mention having a bag, or rack on my bike - he chooses to carry his laptop, clothes, etc - in a bag that he carries on his back - he recently tried a new messenger type bag, and then got an Osprey (hiking?) backpack to try to distribute the weight differently. I am just afraid of adding weight to myself - which will add to my down momentum if I fall, or cause me to be off-balance in the first place.
    is there something that can be taken on and off - when you are commuting, or just riding?

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    555
    Topeak makes a rack you can mount to your seatpost and uses a quick release so it's easy to take on and off. They have a rail system on the rack to go with their bags. It's not a HUGE bag, but large enough to hold a lunch, tools, deoderant, wash cloth, other small things. Not big enough for me to fit all my clothes and shoes in though. It's really easy to put on and off the bag, so you can take it in to work. The actual rack has a 20 pound weight limit. It could work if you are not planning on bringing all your clothes to work.

    http://www.topeak.com/2006/products/bags/bagsmain.php
    http://www.topeak.com/2006/products/...txbeamrack.php

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    1,080

    Baby Wipes ROCK!

    Nobody's mentioned baby wipes. If your commute is short enough that you don't require a shower, you can just baby wipe off (face, arms, legs, etc), apply deodorant, brush your hair and go!

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    3,932
    Quote Originally Posted by cherinyc
    gosh the pannier looks big - but I would much rather have that on the bike than on my back. my boyfriend seems to cringe when i mention having a bag, or rack on my bike - he chooses to carry his laptop, clothes, etc - in a bag that he carries on his back - he recently tried a new messenger type bag, and then got an Osprey (hiking?) backpack to try to distribute the weight differently. I am just afraid of adding weight to myself - which will add to my down momentum if I fall, or cause me to be off-balance in the first place.
    is there something that can be taken on and off - when you are commuting, or just riding?
    You should check whether you new road bike can take panniers or not. The racier bikes usually can't...

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    30

    Seasoned commuter

    Hiya
    Lots of inetresting and useful tips, ladies.
    I have been riding to work for a few years now (includes the UK and New Zealand). I tend to average around 20 to 25 km each way at the moment ( I have two hospitals I am based at) and have to get around the "I don't have a permanent locker" too.

    I use a panier to keep some weight off the shoulders, but on my racer I would probably have a seat-post based bag (they can take up to 8-10kg and can be bought online if your LBS does not stock them).
    I manage to take clean top, trousers, shoes etc on a daily basis in a small, light back-pack. I use sample sized shower gel bottles (or ones from hotel stays that can be refilled) travel deopderants and mini face cream pots etc. It is relatively easy to do and look smart (I am a doctor and need to look the part in clinics) I feel great every day because I arrive all endorphined and pious!

    The other option of, taking it easy on the way to work is valid if the distance is short, but nothing beats that fresh just-showered, just- exercised feeling.

    Keep trying alternatives and settle on what works for you.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,556

    Oops

    We mentioned leaving clothes at work so you can carry less on your commute. I'll add a caution that it helps to REMEMBER what clothes you have at work. I rode in today thinking that I had a pair of pants and 3 shirts at work. I did have 3 shirts. Had to spend the day in my bike shorts. Not really a problem but I would have preferred a pair of pants.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Traveling Nomad
    Posts
    6,763
    Quote Originally Posted by DebW
    We mentioned leaving clothes at work so you can carry less on your commute. I'll add a caution that it helps to REMEMBER what clothes you have at work. I rode in today thinking that I had a pair of pants and 3 shirts at work. I did have 3 shirts. Had to spend the day in my bike shorts. Not really a problem but I would have preferred a pair of pants.
    Heheh, what kind of job do you have? I work in a casual workplace and can get away with certain types of shorts (conservative), but couldn't get away with bike shorts. Not many of us could, I'll wager! Glad you were able to!

    Emily
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,556
    Quote Originally Posted by emily_in_nc
    Heheh, what kind of job do you have? I work in a casual workplace and can get away with certain types of shorts (conservative), but couldn't get away with bike shorts. Not many of us could, I'll wager! Glad you were able to!

    Emily
    I do atmospheric science, which means I sit in a private office and talk to my computer most of the day. Scientists aren't known to be snappy dressers, and even business professional is beyond most of us. Besides, these folks are used to me walking into the building in cycling clothes as I push my bike into my office. I did shower and change into a polo shirt.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    3,150
    I've ridden in and made myself into a complete lather - and twice those have been the days when, OOPS, the clothes aren't in the bag!
    Off to the college bookstore... generally sweats, but better than sweat!

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    5,316

    clothes

    Don't forget your bra at home either....or else you'll be sitting round in a cycling bra that's ickily sweaty...

    (that was me a couple of weeks ago...good thing i didn't forget my underwear...)

    c

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    9
    I've forgotten my bra twice in the last 18 months that I've been commuting, and had to wear the sweaty jog bra all day long. And there was the day I got caught in a downpour, and although my work clothes were completely dry in their plastic drawstring bag inside my rack trunk, I had forgotten dry underwear So, had my first experience with going commando at work ... Since then I've just made a practice of carrying fresh undies every day - much nicer to go ahead and change those too after a ride.

    I carry my clothes every day since I ride every day, but I do keep my shoes and toiletries at work. No shower available, so I do a thorough baby wipes spongedown, and I also keep some lovely eucalyptus foot spray at work. I gave up on a backpack long ago, too hot and sometimes too heavy on my back. I have a rack and use an expandable Epic TransIt trunk (it has velcro straps to attach to the rack). I can stop on the way home from work, pick up a gallon of milk and carry that home in the trunk (after having moved my work clothes to the plastic grocery bag, tied to the handlebar).

    Riding to work is fantastic, I love it. None of those early morning sleepies after having ridden 8 miles to work.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Middle Earth
    Posts
    3,997
    mmm-hmm
    mmm-hmm

    what everyone else said...

    I confiscated a set of unused drawers from another desk, rolled it under mine, and have three drawers, one for clothes, one for my ablutions (soap, shampoo, toothbrush/paste, deodourant, "feminie hygiene products"), and one for quick food - bars, sports shake drinks (plenty of milk in office fridge) and soups...


    Courage does not always roar. Sometimes, it is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying,
    "I will try again tomorrow".


  13. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Between the Blue Ridge and the Chesapeake Bay
    Posts
    5,203
    My commute is 14 miles each way through the muck that is Washington, DC humidity, so a shower is essential for me. I'll tell you want I do and what I have learned in my four years of bike commuting. Maybe it will help.

    I get to work early and go up the back way so few people see me. I'm not trying to hide, but wish to remain as low-key as possible. I keep a small hairdryer and essentials in the shower room, but you could keep them in a tupperware thing at your desk along with a towel.

    I definitely recommend looking into panniers. You have to determine if you have dropouts (attaching holes) on your bike that will accept a rack. Panniers come in various sizes. Alternately, you could look into a trunk bag. If you will be lugging a laptop to and fro, panniers will keep the weight on your bike and off your back. Also, laptops should be protected. My Arkel Briefcase pannier (www.arkel-od.com) is great, but not cheap. I prefer to leave my computer at work, but sometimes I need it at home.

    I leave a couple of pairs of shoes at work, too. One black pair and one blue pair. That generally covers all that I will need to coordinate. Oh, and back up undies and bra, just in case you forget (I have forgotten, and I'm so glad the backups were there!)

    Ironing and starching blouses, folding them neatly, and wrapping them in dry cleaner bags will keep them smooth and amazingly wrinkle free in a pannier. If you really want, you could make a blouse sandwich between two pieces of cardboard (along with the plastic bag).

    Good luck and have fun. Commuting makes me more energetic, positive, and productive at work. A bike ride is a great way to start the day (and end on a high note!)

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    8,548
    Hi, I know what you mean about being in bike uniform at work... we have staggered shifts here (people start at 530, 6, 630 , 7, 8, etc...)
    so I can't really come and go without SOMEONE seeing me. But they all know I rode the bike in and they have gotten used to it just as they would if i was riding a motorcycle (They have a lot of stuff to put on and take off!!)
    When you're only wearing this stuff when you are coming and going, they will associate it with your commute, not your daily outfit!

    I have a 4 mile each way commute too, and yes, 4 miles IS enough to work you into a sweat if there's a hill. But lucky for me, MY hill is downhill to work and uphill HOME so I get home totally drenched..
    but i get hill practice every day i commute!
    Mimi Team TE BIANCHISTA
    for six tanks of gas you could have bought a bike.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    8,548
    where in NJ are you commuting? oh wait, Princeton area, right?
    Mimi Team TE BIANCHISTA
    for six tanks of gas you could have bought a bike.

 

 

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