Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Hand Pain

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Corpus Christi, TX
    Posts
    85

    Hand Pain

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    Um, I've been using the search button, but I'm not finding what I'm looking for.

    When I went out for my first 'long ride'=wanting to bike for longer than 30 minutes. Anywho, my hands started getting sore & I realize that I'm using them to support myself, which I know is a no-no. But when I use the search function it seems like everyone says to change handlebar tape, but I'm curious if there is anything else for me to try before going to tape??

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    9,324
    Try thinking about using your abs and your legs to support yourself. Try to be aware of NOT putting weight on your hands.

    V.
    Discipline is remembering what you want.


    TandemHearts.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
    Posts
    9,673
    Yep, move your hands around a lot on the bike after you've done some core body work - abs and push-ups.
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    I'm the only one allowed to whine
    Posts
    10,557
    Abs, abs, abs. And don't lock your elbows. Gloves are good. Maybe raise your bars?
    "If Americans want to live the American Dream, they should go to Denmark." - Richard Wilkinson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    4
    As a new rider (since March) I've been having the same problem. I just went back to my bike store to ask about this problem and have a proper fitting done. I was told that a lot of things were off : the handle bar stem and height, seat height, and seat position (it was too far forward). Essentially I was sitting in the wrong position and too much of my weight was too far forward. This resulted in my putting too much pressure on my hands. I haven't had a chance yet to see how much this changed things, but maybe you should take a look at your bike fit as well?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    1,253
    In order of importance (IMO):

    1. Make sure your bike fits properly, if you have to reach too far for the handlebars no amount of core strength will prevent this problem.

    2. Avoid the "death grip", locked elbows, kinked/dropped wrists, etc. Keep your wrists reasonably straight and light. Hold your body up with your core trunk muscles, don't just plop on your hands like a sack of potatoes.

    3. Change hand position every few minutes.

    2. Good padded gloves and possibly handlebar tape or "bar phat" can help with tingling/numbness on long rides.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Benicia, CA
    Posts
    1,320
    Yep! I agree with Dianyla!

    Also, I have Pearl Izumi gel gloves. That helps with cushioning.
    Nancy

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    30
    Hand pain?
    Do you have dropped handlebars or straight? If you have straight ones do you have bar-ends?

    I agree with Dianyla about the rest of the bike too. If you saddle is too tilted (you know how we do sometimes to offload our "bits", it can shift your weight too far forwards. Also if you are over-reached, the same result.

    Firstly you need to concentrate on keeping your weight off your arms either by 1, bike adjustments or 2, trunk or core strength.

    Secondly you need to make your hands as comfy as possible for the weight that you cannot avoid putting through them; with bar tape and good gloves.

    Core stability is probably the one thing that we all neglect and any bike trainer will get you doing exercises as soon as look at you! Core strength is used in climbing, riding hard and fast and for general posture on longer rides. So we all need it really to avoid niggles in necks, shoulders and hands.

    Planks are the safest and surest way to build up core strength without risking back injury: elbows and forearms and toes are on the floor, while your body makes like a plank. Build up the time you can hold it for. You will be amazed how hard it gets and how quickly! If you wear a pulse meter reader at the same time, you just watch your heart-rate rise!
    Side planks are simelar; feet together, elbow and forearm at shoulder level and lift your body up in-line. You can lay your non-loaded arm along your side. Then change sides and repeat.

    I started doing 20 seconds at each combined with some proper back-protecting sit-ups and I can now do over a minute. It has stopped all my hand pain, improved my climbing position and I generally feel less worn out after a long ride.

    Planks...that's the answer.
    Good luck!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    2,033
    Hi all,

    so I've found I have either a 100 or 110 mm stem (don't know exactly how to measure - center of the, erm, attachment screw (??) to center of the bracket for the handlebar - ?) and that they are offered down to 80 or even 70 mm for road bikes.

    I think I also have a chance to insert raisers under the stem, right now there's only a 5mm raiser and that could be increased, correct?

    Will I need to expect a great difference in terms of handling the bike? I am quite secure in the flat/climbing etc and usually ride in the drops on descents to be safe.
    Since I am aiming at having my hands on the horizontal part of the handlebar most often (that helped a lot on my last ride) as opposed to the brake hoods (too much pressure), will 70 mm be risky?

    Any help would be much appreciated.
    It's a little secret you didn't know about us women. We're all closet Visigoths.

    2008 Roy Hinnen O2 - Selle SMP Glider
    2009 Cube Axial WLS - Selle SMP Glider
    2007 Gary Fisher HiFi Plus - Specialized Alias

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
    Posts
    9,673
    I'll take a stab:

    Stem length:Measure center of the stem binder bolt to the center of the bars.
    http://www.parktool.com/repair/readhowto.asp?id=130 (see letter G)
    An experienced fitter can look at the geometry of the bike and tell you if a 70 mm stem is too short for handling purposes. Probably yes, but only someone familiar with the geometry and handling characteristics of your specific model and size bike can give you a good answer.

    Stem spacers: do you have a spacer on top of the stem now? If the top cap of the head set is flush with the stem (like in the picture above) you cannot add a spacer below the stem. You can swap locations of spacer above and below the stem only. The steerer tube of the fork dictates how many spacers you can use in total. A stem with a higher rise could accomplish the same thing.

    Hand placement: you need to have the position set up properly so you can ride in the hoods and move back to the top of the bar for relief.
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    463
    Dok-torr, thanks for mentioning core strength and the plank exercise. Another interesting detail is that "core" stretches all around the trunk, so strenghthening the sides will add to core strength. You can do the plank while lying on your side, either by bracing with your thigh and knee bent (easier), or with straight legs and bracing from the feet (harder).

    This is one of my pet topics having gone through physical therapy for my back recently. The idea of using my abs to get my weight off my hands seems impossible at the moment, but that's because I'm still getting stronger.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •