Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Empty Vessel

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Toronto, ON
    Posts
    45

    Empty Vessel

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    I am completely new to the world of mountain biking - all mountain biking I have done before has involved borrowed or rental bikes. Of course, being me, I bought a bike with lots of bells and whistles (to be fair it was used...) and now I have no idea what I need to do to maintain this bike. I was in the store the other day and was amazed to see that they were selling pumps for the shocks (this is a full suspension). To date my bike maintenance has involved (a) pumping up the tires, (b) replacing any flats, (c) having the chain cleaned and relubed once a year, (d) replacing pedals and seats as required, (e) raising and lowering the seatpost and handlebars to taste, and (f) having the brakes adjusted annually. Do I need a shock pump? Do I need to put fluid in my hydraulic brakes. Help! What else don't I know that I don't know?

    Can someone give me a checklist and a maintenance schedule? I feel like I just bought a car

    Mel

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
    Posts
    9,673
    Have you looked on the manufacturer's web site to download the owner's manuals? First place to start.

    Then, go to www.parktool.com for good basics.

    Mtbike chains, brakes and cables need a lot more attention that a once a year look over.
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    407
    Quote Originally Posted by MelC
    (a) pumping up the tires, (b) replacing any flats,
    Excellent...

    Quote Originally Posted by MelC
    (c) having the chain cleaned and relubed once a year,
    This is something you are going to have to do more freqently depending on how often you ride. My mountain bike gets degreased and lubed after every off-road ride. If I've been just riding on the road, then maybe once a week. It certainly gets degreased and lubed before every race.

    Quote Originally Posted by MelC
    (d) replacing pedals and seats as required, (e) raising and lowering the seatpost and handlebars to taste, and (f) having the brakes adjusted annually
    This is good...

    Quote Originally Posted by MelC
    . Do I need a shock pump? Do I need to put fluid in my hydraulic brakes. Help! What else don't I know that I don't know?
    If you have a front suspension air shock, then you might want to buy a shock pump. They are around $40 give or take. You are going to want to set them to what the manufacturers specs say for your weight. If you recently bought this bike, maybe the bike shop would do it for free (then you could hold off on the shock pump for a while). If you have hydraulic brakes you are going to have to learn how to bleed the lines and maybe adjust the calipers.


    Quote Originally Posted by MelC
    Can someone give me a checklist and a maintenance schedule?
    Like SadieKate said, read your manual. You might need to go beyond that though. You might want to go to specific manufactures websites and pull their instruction manuals for your suspension and brakes.

    I recently bought a full suspension Trek Fuel EX 9 and it has more bells and whistles than I could imagine. The suspension has many complicated settings that I'm going to have to learn how to adjust. I have suspension remote on my handlebars....I can adjust both front and rear while I'm riding. Now that is crazy!
    Just keep pedaling.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    North Central Florida
    Posts
    3,387
    The shock pump is pretty easy to use. You need it for the rear shock. Once you have one, it's amazing how much you needed it and didn't know...

    The brakes manufacturer's website should have an owner's manual for them. My brakes are mechanical, so I never had to mess around with hydraulics.

    All my friends and BF that have the chain cleaner thing that you run the chain through swear by it.

    Nanci
    ***********
    "...I'm like the cycling version of the guy in Flowers for Algernon." Mike Magnuson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    407
    Quote Originally Posted by Nanci
    The shock pump is pretty easy to use. You need it for the rear shock.

    Nanci
    Don't you mean front shock? Am I going to have to pump up my rear shock also? I'm going to have to download all the manuals for my new bike.....Man, I have so many bells and whistles on my new Trek, it's gonna take a month to learn how to set everything up!
    Last edited by madisongrrl; 03-29-2006 at 09:31 AM.
    Just keep pedaling.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
    Posts
    9,673
    You can need a pump for both the fork and the rear shock. The same one should work for both. Download the manuals for each and read the recommendations for settings based on rider weight.
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    North Central Florida
    Posts
    3,387
    It's easy! You'll be fine! I'm sure the LBS guys would be happy to give you a lesson on the shock pump if you need them to. Like SK says, the manufacturer's site for the shocks will have a chart for psi based on rider weight. It's not complicated at all.

    Nanci
    ***********
    "...I'm like the cycling version of the guy in Flowers for Algernon." Mike Magnuson

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    407
    I don't know that I'm worried about the shock pump itself and setting the shocks up for my weight. (My bro has a shock pump and is going to give me a lesson). It is all the rebound settings and compressions settings...and the remote control. It's a lot of crap to deal with! But, I guess I paid for it, so I better learn to use it. Racing season is a month away and I feel like I don't have that much time to dial in my bike or learn how to best use all those settings. It was so much easier with a hardtail! But my back and shoulders will thank me.

    http://www2.trekbikes.com/bikes/bike...d=1166600&f=14
    Last edited by madisongrrl; 03-29-2006 at 11:13 AM.
    Just keep pedaling.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
    Posts
    9,673
    Take a deep breath. The compression and rebound settings apply to your fork whether it is on a hardtail or an FS. Once you get these dialed in you can leave it alone. You can probably get really close riding on and off curbs in your neighborhood.

    Is the remote control for a lockout on the fork and rear shock? Ignore it. It's just one extra complexity that isn't really critical to the ride. Test it out when you feel comfortable.
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    407
    Quote Originally Posted by SadieKate
    Take a deep breath. The compression and rebound settings apply to your fork whether it is on a hardtail or an FS.
    Not on my old hardtail....The front shock was so simple....All it had was a nob that you tighten or loosen arbitrarily...you couldn't lock anything out or set anything to your weight (no air shock). It was a pathetic excuse for a front suspension fork. I don't know if they even make shocks like that anymore, do they? Maybe on lower end bikes?

    The guy at the bike shop said I have 3 settings I need to dial in blah, blah, etc. So I guess I'm gonna have to download all those manuals and have a reading session this weekend. I would really like to take it off road to dial in all this suspension crap, but in WI the trails don't open until May. Bummer.

    Remote
    http://www.sram.com/en/rockshox/cont...loc/poploc.php
    Rear
    http://www.sram.com/en/rockshox/moun...ks/mc/mc3r.php
    Front
    http://www.sram.com/en/rockshox/moun.../reba/team.php



    Thanks for all the advice gals,
    Just keep pedaling.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Toronto, ON
    Posts
    45
    Thanks for the responses everyone. I downloaded what I could find off the Devinci site. Unfortunately this is a discontinued model from last year so I couldn't find the Owner's Manual which seems to be referred to in the tech manual. Because it is a used bike I didn't get all the papers with it. The good news, however, is that I bought it off a woman's mtb club in the area (it was a used team bike). They threw in a few membership so I was going to check them out and I don't doubt they will be more than happy to give me some pointers on this specific model.

    Mel

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Bendemonium
    Posts
    9,673
    MelC, you should be able to find all the manuals for your fork, rear shock, brakes, drivetrain components, etc., on the specific manufacturer's site.

    Call Devinci. They may be able to send you the manual.
    Frends know gud humors when dey is hear it. ~ Da Crockydiles of ZZE.

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •