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Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,717

    There is something wrong with me...

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    That I think this is a good deal.

    https://www.rsdbikes.com/portfolio/middlechild-cr-mo/
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,132
    Remember our discussion regarding going too extreme?

    From experience, when I've dropped below 68 degrees on the head tube angle, coupled with a long travel suspension fork, I start to experience slow to respond, goofy steering when I'm riding in the twisty stuff and, especially, when I'm climbing. The bike fights me. Needs constant attention with the front wheel so far out in front. Tried it on a Giant with 67 degree head tube angle and a 120mm suspension fork. Tried everything to get along with that bike and the way it handled. Gave up. Test rode on the trail a Specialized with the same geometry. No go for me. And you want to go with 64.5 degrees and a super long travel suspension fork? Yikes! You better test ride that one, for sure. That's a downhill bike all the way.

    I get it about going slack on the downhills. Makes for the most stable bike on the fast downhills. Less chance of an endo. Handles obstacles, better. Better for log hopping. Better for taking on boulders. It's the best geometry for that crazy, high speed kamikaze downhill stuff that is super popular, right now. Yeah, it's fun. Did it a lot before my accident, but that slack setup came at the cost of the kind of handling I like on the rest of my trail riding. And it is dangerous. Thanks to my accident, I go much slower on my downhill runs, now, and standard XC geometry with head tube angles of 69 to 71 degrees does fine on the downhills. Much more to my liking for general trail riding. That's me, though.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,717
    But, the turquoise is nice.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,717
    Ah, turquoise! Better?

    https://allcitycycles.com/bikes/archive/jyd

    Actually, now that I'm looking at that long, low geometry, maybe not.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 10-16-2018 at 04:57 PM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,132
    As I said, I get it about the current push for slack MTB geometry, but, once again, I think the industry is pushing things to the limit and catering to a select group of specialized riders when they go that slack. Not saying it's wrong. Some folks really do benefit from that extreme geometry. Just saying that the industry is hyping it to the point of potentially putting a lot of riders on the wrong kind of bike for their needs. I do think the MTB segment of the industry tends to be more trendy than the road bike segment.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,717
    I had no idea, that there was such a thing as a FAT CAAD.

    Oh. My.

    https://www.cannondale.com/en/USA/Bi...ntid=undefined
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,132
    Be hard to find a mainline bike manufacturer, now, that doesn't have a fat bike in their line. My bike shop tells me the big boom in fat bikes of some years, back, has subsided, overall, with sales still steady and strong up here in snow country and some other locations where those big tires are useful, but down in other areas where fat bikes were mostly bought as novelty bikes, just to have something different and fun.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,717
    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    Be hard to find a mainline bike manufacturer, now, that doesn't have a fat bike in their line. My bike shop tells me the big boom in fat bikes of some years, back, has subsided, overall, with sales still steady and strong up here in snow country and some other locations where those big tires are useful, but down in other areas where fat bikes were mostly bought as novelty bikes, just to have something different and fun.
    I love my Cannondale CAADX. A datbike version is tempting, and we have a lot of deep sand, here.more than a novelty. It would be useful.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

 

 

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