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  1. #76
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
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    1,108

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    Speaking of single speeds, did 23.3 miles of pavement on a beautiful fall morning, this morning. Almost seemed effortless to pedal those miles on such a day. My conditioning is paying off, to be sure, but those miles just seemed to fly by, all the same.

    Got home and wanted more, so I switched bikes to the Log Lady and then Star and I did 2.5 miles on the trails. The Log Lady is a racing bike, as in XC MTB racing, and it handles like it. Very fast, agile and nimble, yet stable. Delightful trail bike to ride on a fall day.

  2. #77
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,897
    Thanks all for your input.

    This is my current road bike: 2010/trek/madone47wsd. This is the men's bike I had before it: 2003/trek/2000.

    I am 5'7". The above bikes were both 54.

    I went to the LBS today. They didn't have a Checkpoint in a 54 for comparison. They offered to let me try a 54 Domane but I declined for now because it was raining. The reason they wanted me to try it was to show me that the frame geometry of the current bikes is way different than it was 7-8 years ago. (Apparently my 2010 bike is retro, not "modern." Go figure.)

    I am really not happy with Trek right now, because I think their website is intentionally misleading instead of being straightforward about a big change in their products. However I am happy with the bike shop, and have a long history with them. And I think they are really mostly a Trek dealer. I think I am willing to try out a Trek because of my relationship with the bike shop. If I can't work with their fitter to make a Trek work, I will ask about the other brands. Of course I still haven't heard from the company that handles the free hybrid bike to find out what they will substitute for the 2018 sold-out bike on their website. Until I get that information, I will not move ahead with test rides, etc., since the whole point here is to save a chunk of cash on a new bike.


    The main reason I went to the bike shop today was because my Madone's rear wheel squeal (or Mavic moo, as my friend calls it) is worse now than it was before. I rode 58 miles yesterday and it mooed a lot from almost the first mile. Other than that, it was a great ride. I was the leader and I posted it on two bike club schedules. I ended up with 19 people total. And for the first time in a long time I ran out of cue sheets at a ride -- usually most people use a Garmin or Ride with GPS on their phones, so they don't take paper cue sheets, but yesterday most of the riders were old-school low-tech (as I am). Fortunately I knew the route well enough that I could give my cue sheet to someone else.

    There was rain early in the morning but the roads were mostly dry by the time we started the ride. Most of the other riders were faster than me (I ride at the low end of the ride category pace) and I think most of them skipped the first rest stop. So I didn't see more than half of them after the ride start. Which is not ideal, but doesn't really bother me. I still had a couple of people to ride with and the weather turned out to be great, with temps in the 70s, partial sun and humidity lowering as the day went on. We had a brisk NE sea breeze when we were near the Chesapeake Bay but that was only for a few miles. Overall it was a great day and I'm glad we had nice weather for a change.

    Now it's raining again, and will continue to rain for a few days. So it was a good time to take the bike to the shop to try to resolve the Mavic moo once and for all. I started a different thread on that, and will update it.
    Last edited by ny biker; 09-23-2018 at 04:34 PM.

    - Gray 2010 carbon WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red hardtail 26" aluminum mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue 2018 aluminum gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver 2003 aluminum road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  3. #78
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,897
    I am impressed that you found those numbers! And your understanding of frame geometry is also impressive, Sheila.

    I agree that it would make sense to try the Checkpoint in a 52. When I go back to the LBS to pick up the Madone with the new rear wheel, I will see if they have one in stock.

    I don't actually have a Domane, I was just looking at one as an example of current frame geometry being very different from older bikes, and had thought about getting one when I first started looking into the current Trek offerings.

    Thanks!

    - Gray 2010 carbon WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red hardtail 26" aluminum mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue 2018 aluminum gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver 2003 aluminum road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  4. #79
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,897
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Ok, looks like the size 52 is comparable to your 2010 bike..

    Trek checkpoint size 52
    Stack: 549
    Reach: 379
    HTA: 71.6 deg
    STA: 74 deg
    HT: 10.7
    ETT: 536

    Stack and reach, the most important numbers, are very close. This Head tube is a bit more slack, which is expected for a bike that may be taken off road. Sounds like it’s actually very like your Domane. Do you know what step length is on the Domame? Is it the stock stem?
    I found the numbers for the old Trek 2000 men's bike from 2003, on page 42 of this. No stack or reach numbers, but there is this:
    HTA: 73.0
    STA: 74.0
    ETT: 54.4

    Standover comparisons:
    CP 54: 78.9
    CP 52: 77
    Madone 4.7: 74.0
    2000: 77.2

    EFF for the Checkpoint 54 is longer than for the old Trek 2000.

    It's really interesting to compare the details for the different bike frames in different sizes. A 54 for one is quite different from a 54 for another bike.

    - Gray 2010 carbon WSD road bike, Rivet Independence saddle
    - Red hardtail 26" aluminum mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle
    - Royal blue 2018 aluminum gravel bike, Rivet Pearl saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver 2003 aluminum road bike
    - Two awesome worn out Juliana saddles

  5. #80
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    N.Y., good luck on the Mavic moo thing. Like everyone else, I'd just be guessing as to the cause, but please do let us know if you discover what's causing that weird noise. Hope the new wheel is the solution. Shimano wheels are a pretty safe bet. That's what will be going on my new Log Lady build.

    At 5'7", a 54cm bike would be the right place for you to start for a good fit. I'm 5'9" and I go to a 56cm or, better yet, a 55cm, if they make it. I then factor in the usual mods needed when I test ride. As I've said, that's usually a new saddle, shorter stem and, sometimes, a narrower handlebar, even on a drop bar bike. Always a pain in the butt, but that's life for me when buying a unisex or men's bike.

    The other factor that complicates predicting how a bike fits is our riding style. Mine, for instance, has changed since my accident. I was more or less forced into riding in a more upright position after my accident, but I now find that I greatly prefer it and tune my bikes, accordingly. If nothing else, pedaling more upright gives me a better view of our wonderful north woods scenery. At one time, though, I was pretty heavily into a down and aggressive riding position, but no more. That kind of position, though, is a whole different matter as to bike fit and bike choice. Good luck on your quest.

    PS. Just a note of caution when comparing manufacturer's stack and reach numbers. Those are typically frame stack and reach numbers, not handlebar stack and reach numbers that you get when the bike is assembled. The final numbers as far as actual, effective stack and reach to the handlebars will change with the number of fork spacers you use under the stem when you put it on the fork, the length and angle of the stem and, of course the style of handlebar. Even moving your saddle forward or back can change these actual handlebar numbers, not to mention changing your seat height.

    This is what I do when shopping for a new bike. I first check the frame stack and reach numbers on one of my current bikes that I like. I then compare those numbers to the frame stack and reach numbers on the new bike I want to buy. The numbers don't have to be a perfect match, though. They can be off 10mm (still less than half an inch) or so, even a bit more, because I can always adjust my final handlebar stack and reach as needed with changing out the right parts.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 09-24-2018 at 07:35 AM.

  6. #81
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    Mist, drizzle mixed with intermittent rain, yesterday. In other words, a trail riding day and my bike of choice was the Krampus single speed conversion with its big 29x3" tires for safety. Lots of wet leaves on the ground and other debris, but the bigger plus tires on the Krampus handled it all without a problem. Did 5.5 miles of laps and went out if my way to do a lot of climbs, so it was a good workout.

    So was removing one last stump at the bottom of a downhill run. Not a big stump, mind you. Only about 4" high and three or four inches in diameter, but that makes it all the harder to see and is plenty big enough to cause a serious fall if hit. Was already there when I started building trails, so I just went around it, but it's still only about a foot off to the side of the trail. No problem for me, because I know exactly where it is, but it could be an issue for someone new to my trails or even for me if it got buried with leaves or snow and I got careless. Anyway, a full hour of whacking it with an ax and digging it out. Whew! I really am getting too old for this kind of stuff, but it's gone, now, so all is well.

    Thinking of selling the old Pugsley. It was mostly used for road work, which I now do exclusively with the much faster bikes. Plus, it was a large and took a lot of mods to fit me and even then was a bit awkward. Figured I'd let someone else get some good use out of it. We'll see.

  7. #82
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    We had torrential, cold rain yesterday and overnight. There was some concern about today's group ride, as there is a prediction of showers possible and definitely later in the afternoon. Given the wet roads and the fact I am traveling tomorrow, I erred on the side of being cautious and superstitious about crashing, and went to the gym for spin/core. They did end up cancelling the longer ride, but not the one I was going to do. It's sooo humid almost 75 degrees now. In preparation last night, though I went to download the route to my Garmin and discovered all of the mapping software was gone! DH spent 1.5 hours trying to fix it, which he did, but this is not a good sign. I usually get his hand me downs and he is not getting a new one soon, as there's no new model.
    Anyway, it's DH's birthday today and I have not bought him a present yet, so I am off to do that, before he gets home early today! I will not be riding in Columbus, GA, although there is a cool bike shop there where we could rent something. I plan to concentrate on my granddaughter, but there's a riverwalk that I can walk on, with her in the stroller.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

  8. #83
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Traveling Nomad
    Posts
    6,763
    Have a safe and fun trip, Crankin, and happy b-day to your DH!

    Did our usual road & trail ride yesterday and the day before for 70 miles total. Today is a day off the bike (although I will ride the cruiser bike to the vet later for some dog food - 2 miles each way). I will work out in the gym this morning.

    Friday will be my last ride for awhile unless I have time to ride in NC. We are traveling north for a couple of reasons. One, my DH has a small squamous cell carcinoma in his sideburn area, which he'll have removed at his dermatologist on Oct. 5th. I'll have my regular mammogram that day too, since we'll be in Chapel Hill. Then we'll spend a little over a week visiting my parents in western NC. Several of those days, I'll be with them and my brother in the mountains. The days we're not in the mountains, my mother always has a list of small chores she needs help with, so not sure how much we'll be able to ride, if any. Don't particularly care for riding there anyway, as I've mentioned before, as the area where she lives just isn't very cycling friendly (no shoulders on roads, traffic, etc.)

    We are leaving all our bikes (except for my cruiser bike) in their garage in NC because we're heading (flying) to Mexico on November 1 for six months or more. I'm giving my cruiser bike to a friend here in the RV park when we leave. We're trying a small beach town along the Yucatan gulf coast this time, in hopes that it will be much quieter than Playa del Carmen centro, where we spent two separate six-month periods before. We have an Airbnb house so won't have any shared walls or floors with neighbors, which we think will be better than when we were in Playa in apartments. We won't have bikes at first as we don't want to schlep the Bike Fridays down (we have enough to take as it is, including our dog). There are bike shops around, though, so once we scope out the area, there's a good chance we will buy bikes -- inexpensive beach cruisers or, if we think we'll stay there longer, we might spring for "real" bikes in Merida, where there are nice bike shops, not just cruiser bikes. We'll see. It's going to be fun to have another adventure once I finally get these braces off my teeth (Oct. 22nd - two months behind schedule). We are overdue for a change from Florida!
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

  9. #84
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    Emily, hope all turns out well with the health issues and, wow!, that is quite the change of scenery. Does sound like an adventure. Knowing you, I'll bet you'll end up doing some riding, down there, on a "real" bike, as you say. When in a new area, biking is always my preferred way to explore and get a feel for the area. Might be able to get a new bike cheaper down there, too, since this tariff war of Trump's might affect bike prices, up here, at some point. The dollar tends to buy more in Mexico, anyway. As far as bikes, I'd have no problem buying a new Tiagra equipped bike. Pretty solid group, now, at a very reasonable price.

    Raim, rain and then, more rain and more drizzle for me. Yuk! Give me a break. Still riding, though, but mostly back in the woods where I stay a bit drier under all the trees and leaves. The color is starting to come on, strong, now, and the leaves are beginning to fall, so I'll soon be getting as wet on the trails as the roads. pretty, though, back in the woods, as always. That, and I always have some company when I ride the trails with Star, our Border Collie. She loves running the trails as much as I do.

    Well, looks like I'll be getting another steel single speed in the All City Nature Boy. Worked out a trade in with my old Pugsley at my favorite shop. Still have my new 2nd edition Pugsley and like it better than the original, which was a large, and not a great fit for me, anyway. The new Nature Boy will be geared exclusively for road work and I'm going to be running 700x38 tires on it to negotiate some gravel road riding. Will try it with the factory drop bar setup, first, but it can be easily switched to a flat bar if that doesn't work for me. Hope to get a lot of road riding in with the new bike, yet this fall, before winter shuts me down to riding fat bikes, only. Yup, trading one green bike for another green bike. Fun!

  10. #85
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    Thanks, Sheila. No, wanted to stay single speed on this one, so the Nature Boy was really the only option. The race version is not available, so no go on that one. I can convert the Nature Boy to flat bar pretty easily, since All City uses the same frame for their drop bar and flat bar single speed bikes. We'll see. Stopped at the shop, today, and the new Nature Boy had just arrived, but still in the box. Be a couple days before it is ready.

    Rode the trails in the rain, again, this morning and they were pretty soggy. Used my Norco Sasquatch fat bike with its big tires and aluminum frame, so no damage to either the trails or the bike with all the water. Rain left, late afternoon, so hubby and I did a short neighborhood ride on the pavement, me riding the Log Lady, rather than the fat bike. Going fat on dry pavement is just more pedaling effort than I want to expend, anymore. I'll be using the fat bikes for road riding soon enough when the snow falls. It's really going to hurt not being able to ride my fast single speeds, this winter. Depresses me a bit thinking about it. Not sure how I'll handle it. Could be a very long winter for me. ):
    Last edited by north woods gal; 09-27-2018 at 03:10 PM.

  11. #86
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    Yes, I agree on the All City geometry. Their bikes are very traditional in their geometry. The Log Lady, for instance has XC MTN geometry for a fast ride with relatively steep head tube and seat tube angles, instead of the slack head tube and seat tube trail geometry that is so popular on trail bikes, now. That popular slack trail geometry is legit for handling obstacles in the trail, better, but since I'm no longer climbing boulders or log hopping, I don't really need it. XC MTB geometry is fast and very nimble and fun to ride for trails. Just need to keep off the trick stuff and keep both wheels firmly planted in the dirt. Happy to report that I still love trail riding without doing any of the trick stuff. My accident cured me of that for good.

    Going to do some trail work, today, to clear leaves and trail litter. This is a safety thing for riding my standard MTB bikes like the Log lady with its 2.25" tires. Not needed so much for the fat bikes, but still a good idea for them, too.

    As much as I am enjoying the trail riding, though, I'm still doing more road riding and enjoying it, more. Will even be doing more road riding this winter, than trail riding. Not going to kill myself to groom and keep my trails open with the snow. That nearly wiped me out, last winter. Will let the county plow the snow off our roads, first, then I'll be riding them with the fat bikes.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 09-28-2018 at 10:15 AM.

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Traveling Nomad
    Posts
    6,763
    Sounds like good plans for future riding, nwg. Glad you are still enjoying trail riding in a safer way since your accident. And road riding as well! It's nice to have a variety of different kinds of rides, I think, as it keeps things fresh.

    Congrats on the bike trade. I have never known anyone to have or trade more bikes than you. What fun, though! I am kinda stodgy and keep my bikes forever these days (used to trade them much more frequently), but that's one reason I am excited about the possibilities in Mexico, since I'll surely end up with some kind of new bike, whatever it ends up being. I am really attracted to the idea of a recumbent these days, to see if it helps the pain I have from my roadie in my lower back on the right side - this is where I fractured my pelvis back in 2005, and it still gives me problems in a roadie position. More upright is better, but harder to do longer rides really upright since so much weight is on the saddle area. Plus, since I have fallen a few times, I like the idea of being closer to the ground. I would really like a recumbent trike, I think. I know they are slow on hills, but we will be in a flat area...unfortunately, there is wind, which is like a virtual hill. So, we'll see. I don't even know if they sell recumbents there or if we'll find roads where we can do longer rides, so we may end up with beach cruisers. I'll certainly keep y'all updated!

    My last ride on the West Orange Trail today was pretty good. It had rained cats and dogs last night, so the trail was very wet, with lots of tree debris down. The day was nice, though hot and humid, of course, but with the brilliant blue sky, and believe it or not, a slight amount of fall color here and there, it was still a very pleasant ride. Hard to believe I may never ride this trail that I've ridden 100s of times over the past few years again -- but never say never. I've learned that!
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

  13. #88
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    Excited to hear about your plans, Emily. My first real international trip was to Merida, when I was a senior in high school. I loved that city and now I realize it was more like Spain, than other parts of Mexico.
    We are having a good visit with my som amd family. They are dealing with a bit of hassle with buying their house in Fayetville, with just a little damage from Florence. We will not see them or the new baby, until later December, when they visit in Philadelphia with her family, so we will go down there. The baby is due in the beginning of November, then they will move.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

  14. #89
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    Emily, I've considered going recumbent a time or two, myself, and I have done test rides on a two wheel version and enjoyed it. This was back when my riding was almost exclusively on a drop bar road bike and I was developing a pinched nerve in my back from riding in the same position, hour after hour. Had a friend that rode a recumbent and he swore by it. I could usually beat him up hills, but he would usually beat me down the hills. On the level sections, it was a draw. Those things are a lot faster than they look when you ride side by side with one.

    The only reason I didn't go recumbent was that I was living in Chicago, at the time, with its horrible traffic. Just couldn't bring myself to get down that low and lose visibility, though I probably could have adapted. For me the cure for the pinched nerve was to switch to a standard 26" MTB in a more upright position, but, yeah, it was slower. A recumbent would not work for my trail riding, but I am keeping it as an option for my road riding if my back starts to act up, again. After all, the idea is to keep riding and any type of bike that keeps us riding is a good thing. Recumbents are pricey, though, since most recumbents are made by small shop operations, especially the trike versions. The trike versions, though, could make great utility bikes for hauling stuff. Hope you find one that works for you.

    Crankin, glad you got to see you're having a good visit with family. My two sisters-in-law just left from a visit with us, up here, and hated to see them go.They really are sisters to me, not sisters-in-law.

    Miserable day, yesterday, as far as the weather and riding. Headed out three times after the rain stopped, only to have to head right back indoors due to sudden, quick, heavy downpours. Made 5 miles out of three attempts and called it good. Hate to say it, but it did prompt me to put the comfort bike back on the trainer, though I still couldn't bring myself to ride it. That'll be coming soon, enough, and, yes, I will break down and ride, indoors, if need be, this winter. Not going to beat myself up like I did last winter. Maybe that knock to my head knocked some sense into me.

    P.S. Seeing a lot of birds migrating though our area, now, so fall is definitely, here. Trees are turning color and got below freezing, last night. Good-by to summer. It will be mossed.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 09-29-2018 at 08:00 AM.

  15. #90
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    The climate here is killing me! Really, how anyone can be outdoors in 80-85 degrees and 90% humidity is beyond me. Woke up with a sore throat I know is from the weather and I did not walk today. We went to Calloway Gardens, so some slow walking for about 1.5 miles. Great butterfly house, the birds of prey show, eh. Getting ready for an early dinner a fairly nice place right across the street. Hope my granddaughter does ok. Anyway, we are going to go to the Atlanta zoo tomorrow, so more heat and walking. Our flight doesn’t leave until 7 pm, so it will be a full day.
    I am very glad we came, but I can’t wait to get back to fall!
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

 

 

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