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  1. #91
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,718

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    Molly,

    I think the knobs on my tires are closer together, but just as deep, which makes them nice for hardpack and asphalt. They don't get as much purchase in sand.

    My Karate Monkey is fairly light. But I had it built from a frameset. Plus, it's single speed. And gears add weight. I purchased the wheels (Velocity Blunts) from velomine, and they were fairly inexpensive and light. They were quick release with skewers. Newer mountainbike stuff features thru-axels (designated as TA on some specs). TA's are stronger, and require different hubs. They do sell wheels with TA's on velomine. And you can email and ask them for what you want. Budget custom, if you will. When I switched from Krampus to Karate Monkey, I had the wheels rebuilt with different hubs. Not anything close to what NWG has on her Gunner, but nice enough.

    Oh, my rear tire is a little more narrow than the front. I did that to reduce weight, while still having a little more thickness up front.

    Your bikes are from 2011, so it sounds like you don't waste money on bikes, but buy the right ones and make them last. (Uh, let's not talk about how many bikes I've bought and sold!). Could be worth building from a frameset, or just upgrading an existing bike. It does cost more to do that. But if you really want the perfect bike for you, well, a Surly is fairly budget to begin with. It's not a Madone.

    Single ring cranksets are also the norm on mountainbikes now. Which reduces weight, too. I can definitely lift my bike no problem. Up the stairs. On top of the rack on my car. My flat pedals are also lightweight. They were pricey. But I like them. Huge variety of pedals available, you can find whatever within budget if you look. My seatpost is a Thomson. Again pricey. But lighter weight. And extremely high quality. The micro adjust mechanism is the nicest I've seen anywhere. And the machining and finish on the seatpost is noticeably high quality. I have fairly lightweight aluminum bars on the bike, too.

    My crankset is Raceface Turbine. Available in cool colors. Light weight. Efficient. and strong power transfer so you take off fast. That model was discontinued, now they make something called the Turbine Cinch. I tried one when I demoed a Specialized Fuse. That bike almost propelled itself uphill. It's a worthwhile investment.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 10-29-2018 at 08:50 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,718
    Quote Originally Posted by MollyJ View Post
    Muirenn, went to the Maxxis page for tires. Lots of information--overwhelming! But the graphic on surfaces versus tires was somewhat clarifying.
    Yeah. That is how I chose my Karate Monkey tires. But that was before NWG showed up. I'll probably ask her next time. I know a lot about bikes. But she knows more.

    A thought. This Trek is fairly lightweight, and has an excellent suspension fork on it for the price. (All levels of quality in suspension forks. Just like everything else). I'm not interested in suspension for my own riding. But this is a nice bike. It's about 29 lbs for a men's medium. They have other bikes in the 24 25 lb range. But that will cost a lot. Under $1700.00 for a bike this this is worthwhile.

    https://www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/b...tionsComponent
    Last edited by Muirenn; 10-29-2018 at 01:56 PM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  3. #93
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,133
    Plus one on the Thompson seat posts. Have them on most of my bikes. Worth every penny.

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    105
    Well, clearly, everyone here views the bike as a canvas and you customize it to notch it up and turn it into a work of art. I'm really pretty cheap and my Madone is not, by any means, top of the line but it is the nicest bike I've ever owned and I love it. But that said, I've pretty much stuck with the original equipment. But that seat...I'd sell it in a minute if I felt comfortable that I was leaping towards improvement.

    Does the Thompson seat post mostly add reduced weight or does it improve ride?
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD

    2011 Trek FX7.2--What can I say? It was on sale!

  5. #95
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,718
    Quote Originally Posted by MollyJ View Post
    Well, clearly, everyone here views the bike as a canvas and you customize it to notch it up and turn it into a work of art. I'm really pretty cheap and my Madone is not, by any means, top of the line but it is the nicest bike I've ever owned and I love it. But that said, I've pretty much stuck with the original equipment. But that seat...I'd sell it in a minute if I felt comfortable that I was leaping towards improvement.

    Does the Thompson seat post mostly add reduced weight or does it improve ride?
    I got carried away. Sorry about that. I meant, originally, to say you could pick up a used Surly for a decent price and modify it to make it weigh less. But a lightweight mountainbike does weigh more than a lightweight roadbike. I don't find it a problem, though I consider mine light compared to a lot of rides.

    For your original question on tires, I have Schwalb Sammy Slicks on my cyclocross (Cannondale CAADX). They work on a lot of surfaces. They instantly get stuck in loose, deep sand. But that is what fat tires are for.

    https://www.schwalbetires.com/bike_t...es/sammy_slick

    It's fun to talk about future purchases, even if you never actually get around to it. It gives ideas.

    Looking at the current Trek FX with cantilever brakes, the tires are listed as 700c X 35 mm, the same as on my cyclocross.

    These 'Smart Sams' appear a little more appropriate for the use you said than the ones on my bike. In fact, I might look into them.

    https://www.schwalbetires.com/node/2406
    Last edited by Muirenn; 10-30-2018 at 07:31 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    105
    Muirenn, my experience with complex ideas like this is that you just get in and start swimming. And at first a lot of it just washes over me. But then it starts to make sense and increasingly connect with what I experience. And there is no where to go in my town that I know of to have these kind of conversations. This is really a unique place!

    So just be patient with my newbiness!

    But I enjoy the talk! I am not sure I would ever have the courage or the expertise to buy a frame and trick it out. OR to buy used and modify it to fit. But who knows where we go, right?
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD

    2011 Trek FX7.2--What can I say? It was on sale!

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,718
    Quote Originally Posted by MollyJ View Post
    Muirenn, my experience with complex ideas like this is that you just get in and start swimming. And at first a lot of it just washes over me. But then it starts to make sense and increasingly connect with what I experience. And there is no where to go in my town that I know of to have these kind of conversations. This is really a unique place!

    So just be patient with my newbiness!

    But I enjoy the talk! I am not sure I would ever have the courage or the expertise to buy a frame and trick it out. OR to buy used and modify it to fit. But who knows where we go, right?
    I just didn't want to seem like I was trying to push you into a new bike when you were looking for tires.

    Between NWG and myself, we could probably tell you what parts to buy, and where for the best price. I did buy a few extra by accident when I first had the frameset built. But honestly, a used frameset or bike, and a willing bike shop to help are ideal. That can be hard to find, and you could end up spending a lot more. Shrug. There are so many options.

    If you did buy a mountainbike, how much would you be comfortable spending? You don't have to answer, but it's a good idea to look, and get an idea of how much everything costs, and at what level of quality.

    As an aside, Surly and similar brands are very big in Iowa, Kansas, etc., and that is an excellent place to buy used. They are few and far between even new where I live. I belong to a Surly/Salsa brand used bike group on facebook. If you like, I can send you a link. You are supposed to have a facebook friend add you. But I've heard if you just contact the admins, they will add you. I have not bought anything, but it's a great place to see used Surlys and Salsas and learn more. I just like talking about bikes. Again, a lot of them are listed in your area.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 10-30-2018 at 08:58 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  8. #98
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,718
    The Maxxis cyclocross/gravel tire page has a lot of 35 mm options that would work. There may be more on the Schwalb page that I didn't see. But I like the Maxxis brand tires I've bought. So I tend to give these an edge.

    https://www.maxxis.com/tires/bicycle/gravelcross
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles


    Surly Karate Monkey!!!

  9. #99
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,133
    Quote Originally Posted by MollyJ View Post
    Well, clearly, everyone here views the bike as a canvas and you customize it to notch it up and turn it into a work of art. I'm really pretty cheap and my Madone is not, by any means, top of the line but it is the nicest bike I've ever owned and I love it. But that said, I've pretty much stuck with the original equipment. But that seat...I'd sell it in a minute if I felt comfortable that I was leaping towards improvement.

    Does the Thompson seat post mostly add reduced weight or does it improve ride?
    The Thompson CAN reduce weight, depending on what you have, now. Even if it doesn't, I love the way it adjusts the angle of the seat, plus the quality is top notch. Won't make up for a poorly fitting seat, though.

    As for your Madone, I had a WSD Madone and it really is a GREAT bike. Mine was the basic 105 model, but it remains the ONLY new bike I've ever bought that needed no mods to fit me. I reluctantly sold it. Too many years and too many thousands of miles on a drop bar road bike was causing repetitive stress injuries for me, mostly pinched nerves in my back. That, and switching back and forth between my flat bar MTBs and drop bar road bikes was just too hard on my body, so I now ride only flat bar bikes, road or trails. Never have to feel under-biked with any Madone, though. Class bike all the way.

    As for the seat, that is a whole topic until itself. Very personal thing. We all go though it, trying to find what works best for us. Lots of trail and error. Took me a long time to figure out that I have very wide sit bones and therefore need a wider than average seat. Going too narrow on the seat for all those years may have contributed to my pinched nerve thing on the road bikes. My guy at the bike shop tells me this is not at all uncommon for us gals and he knows other gals who developed the same problems. Poper support on a seat is very important, but going too wide can also cause problems. The seat is less of an issue for me on my MTB riding, because a lot of my riding on the trails is with weight up off the seat or just standing on the pedals. Out on the pavement, though, you're on that saddle just about full time, so very important.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 10-30-2018 at 09:55 AM.

 

 

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