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  1. #46
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    Jun 2013
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    62

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    So, this weekend I have seen and ridden Ruby Elite Disk and base Diverge (without future shock). I am stuck, as I have not yet seen 2018 Cannondale Synapse in any modification. None of the stores around have them on display and I am very interested in this bike, as they are the most affordable with the same components. For instance, Synapse disk Tiagra is $500 cheaper than comparable Domane ALR 4 and $300 cheaper than Diverge. For the price of Domane with Tiagra you get Synapse with 105. There is a $500 difference between Cannondale 105 and similarly built Diverge.
    I am at loss to understand the price policy and why Cannondale bikes are so much cheaper.
    Last edited by Lady Hamilton; 03-19-2018 at 04:49 PM.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post

    You could call around and see if anyone knows someone who would let you try someone's bike. (I saved a fortune, Surly is not custom ).

    Just a thought.
    The problem is, I can try a Domane no problem, even in the right size, but not Cannondale. I went to a women's ride last weekend, and nobody has a Cannondale (

    I might have to do what I don't like doing. Have one of the larger shops bring one in...But in all honesty, I don't know why I wouldn't buy one if I like the ride and it fits well. No matter whichever way you look, both Tiagra and 105 Synapses are at least $300 cheaper than identical Trek and Specialized bikes.

    Trek doesn't even bother putting 105 on aluminum Domane. You have to go carbon and $1300 over Synapse to get 105 group set. Yes, the bike will be carbon...

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    The silver women's Synapse in carbon is beautiful. I suppose you are looking at that one since it's 105? It looks a lot like my CAADX, except it is raw aluminum silver, and it has the old cantilever brakes instead of disc! Another thing about the Synapse. It has thru axels instead of quick release, which is what mountain bikes typically have these days. (Better technology than quick release, and a safer design. You do need an allen key to remove the wheel, but it really isn't difficult. My CAADX has the 'old style' quick release.

    The Synapse is a well-designed bike. A lot more advanced than the others you were looking at in many ways.
    I am actually looking at the alloy one, white. Unfortunately, they decided not to put disk breaks on the 105 carbon (the only model in the line up without disk breaks)... And Ultegra is way outside of budget...

  4. #49
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    I'd take the current Tiagra in a heartbeat over Apex for quality and performance. Have owned both. Apex is bottom of the line in SRAM. Gave me nothing but headaches.

    A top end aluminum frame is not significantly heavier than an entry-level carbon frame - if at all - and if you pair up a good aluminum frame with a carbon fork, it makes for a very nice ride. Great way to get a better component group. The only thing you'll notice with the aluminum frame versus carbon at this level is a different ride feel.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 03-22-2018 at 04:32 PM.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    105
    This is a fascinating thread but since I am just getting in to gravel riding, feel like I need a primer. Is there a good primer resource for gravel riding?
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD

    2011 Trek FX7.2--What can I say? It was on sale!

  6. #51
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    Hi Molly. See my response to your post on riding gravel.

    There are some online forums devoted to gravel riding, but for me, riding gravel has been a learn as I go experience. Honestly, since you live in an area where gravel riding is popular, I'd head to a good local bike shop and visit with them about what you'll need for riding the gravel roads in your area. They could probably hook you up on some group rides on gravel, too. That would be a great way to learn to ride gravel. Me, I've been a solo rider all my life, but mostly that's been out of necessity. Up here, I'm often riding on very remote roads with little traffic. I do love riding these roads, but riding by myself out in the middle of nowhere, so to speak, still makes me a bit nervous. I'd recommend riding in a group to get started, if that's possible in your situation. Even having one riding pal is safer than riding, alone. More fun, too.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 10-25-2018 at 05:57 PM.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Mrs. KnottedYet
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    9,068
    Quote Originally Posted by MollyJ View Post
    This is a fascinating thread but since I am just getting in to gravel riding, feel like I need a primer. Is there a good primer resource for gravel riding?
    My old commute included a short stint on gravel. I found as long as your basic bike handling skills are there it was pretty easy to handle. Just take it slow. You will learn as you go what conditions can cause a spin out.

    One time I was testing out the route before using it as the actual commute. I was on my road bike, skinny tires and all that. We passed a group riding a mix of gravel and some on hard tail mountain bikes. Oh the confusion this caused. As we passed I could hear:

    “OMG, she’s on a road bike!”

    “OMG, are those tires 22?”

    “OMG. She should at least get a MTB ...”

    You really can ride just about anything on gravel. My road bike is fancy schmancy and I don’t want gravel pitts on the precious paint job. Fat tires are what you want on gravel. Yes, with skinnier tires I felt like it digs right into the gravel and just stops. So it’s not the best. But not impossible either. When I got to commuting for reals I took either the Salsa or Soma depending on mood.

    You’ll get a feel for feathering through some bits and looking ahead for the firmer ground.
    Last edited by Trek420; 10-25-2018 at 07:03 PM.
    Fancy Schmancy Custom Road bike ~ Mondonico Futura Legero
    Found on side of the road bike ~ Motobecane Mixte
    Gravel bike ~ Salsa Vaya
    Favorite bike ~ Soma Buena Vista mixte
    N+1 bike ~ Brompton
    https://www.instagram.com/pugsley_adventuredog/

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    105
    OUr LBS is awesome. But I rarely do group rides. It's hard enough to get me on a bike and on the road. Coordinating with others would be "too much". And I'm not, by any stretch, fast. So I'd just feel bad if they all passed me up and pissed if they were slower than me. (A little bit of a cat, I am.) But i do know so local cyclists. And I've done some fair longer rides in the area and can imagine places I'd like to try. Frankly, it surprises me that gravel bikes have drop handlebars. But in Kansas, if you are going to leave town, dropped handle bars have so many advantages. So if I get to that point, I'll wrap my mind around it.
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD

    2011 Trek FX7.2--What can I say? It was on sale!

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    105
    Muirenn, i do have cantilever brakes. When there is the least little moisture, they make a fierce squeaking noise when I brake. (Not exactly a confidence builder.) So much to learn.
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD

    2011 Trek FX7.2--What can I say? It was on sale!

  10. #55
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    Molly, when you get squeaking with cantilever brakes, it's often a matter of getting the pad angles adjusted, correctly. Either that and the pads build up a glaze. I usually clean off the pads a bit with an abrasive or good cleaner when they get too much glaze. That helps. You should replace those pads on a regular basis, anyway.

    On disc brakes, you can also get some really awful screeching. That's also a glaze building up on the rotors. Easy fix, though. I take some light sandpaper and rub the rotors, then make sure to wash off any sand that gets left.

    Also, very much agree with Trek420 about being able to ride any kind of bike anywhere, at least to some extent. Your present bike may not be the best choice for a given riding situation, but your riding skills can overcome a lot of equipment shortcomings. Mostly, though, I'm a big believer on deciding what works for you and not what someone else says.

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    105
    North Woods Gal and Trek 420, my husband has a friend that used to road race as an amateur and I saw him up on the dike--fairly smooth hard pack with some gravel--and I thought he was being daring but didn't doubt he could pull it off because of the bike handling skills. When I first got my Madone, it was a big brave step to ride in a charity ride. I had this mental picture of me causing a multi-bike spill. But...it didn't happen. I also would like to ride the Katy Trail in Missouri. I think gravel tires would handle it perfectly. There would be some climbing but not much--since it's an old train bed.
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD

    2011 Trek FX7.2--What can I say? It was on sale!

  12. #57
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    Those old rail bed trails are called rails-to-trails and are great to ride, because they're relatively straight and the grades on the hills are very gradual. Great way to get off the pavement and get started on gravel riding. Go for it.

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    I have seen the Katy trail and you would definitely need a hybrid with wider tires or a mountain bike. Maybe a gravel bike, but what I saw was very sandy. It looked flat, but the section I saw was in an extremely hilly area, in fact the Tour of Missouri pros had just ridden through here, the day before. That made me think not all of the trail is flat!
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    105
    To my disappointment I have been on the Katy Trail twice but it's always been for short walks. And I think what I remember is some sand, though you could probably choose a route or path. I remember thinking some of it was more gravelly than I typically chose to do on my hybrid. Did you ride on it Crankin? The scoop on it is that it has periodic Bed and Breakfasts and wineries on the route.

    NW, the Katy Trail would take a little planning being in the next state ovder but it might be a nice summer weekend project.
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD

    2011 Trek FX7.2--What can I say? It was on sale!

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    105
    Muirenn, looks like a beautiful bike...I went to the manufacturer's page. So do you have knobby mountain bike tires on it or something else. Sometimes answering the question, "What kind of cycling do I picture myself doing?" is the hardest. In the end, you will do what your bike will let you do.
    2011 Trek Madone 4.5 WSD

    2011 Trek FX7.2--What can I say? It was on sale!

 

 

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