Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 72
  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108

    To disable ads, please log-in.

    If the roughest you expect to encounter is smooth packed dirt, then you could do just fine with a standard road bike with 700x25 wheels IF conditions are good and remain that way.

    It's when road and weather conditions are not good that going to a 700x35 wheel setup is a great advantage. For instance, going wider on the tires is going to make for a more comfy ride when you start to hit those long stretches of pavement riddled those annoying cross cracks. Pedal, pedal, ouch, pedal, pedal, ouch gets old. Going wider is also safer when you get sand, debris, glass and other junk left on the pavement. Going wider is absolutely better if that packed dirt turns a little muddy or slick after a rain or even when that pavement gets slick with rain. Trust me, it takes surprisingly little to trip up a narrow tire road bike and bring you down. Been there, done that. Then, too, every time I've ventured into a new area with no idea of what I'll encounter for roads, I feel MUCH more confident when I'm riding wider tires. That's why the wider tire bikes are called adventure bikes or touring bikes.

    Again, going light is nice and always tempting, but the more miles I've ridden over the years, the more I value comfort and safety on the long rides.

    I've been eyeing a Norco Reach steel 105 700x40 bike. Right at that $2000 US price point. It's not available, yet, but it has all the stuff I want on a long distance/gravel bike. Norco is a Canadian company, by the way. I run Norco on most of my fat bikes. Very well thought out designs. Love them.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    If the roughest you expect to encounter is smooth packed dirt, then you could do just fine with a standard road bike with 700x25 wheels IF conditions are good and remain that way.

    It's when road and weather conditions are not good that going to a 700x35 wheel setup is a great advantage. For instance, going wider on the tires is going to make for a more comfy ride when you start to hit those long stretches of pavement riddled those annoying cross cracks. Pedal, pedal, ouch, pedal, pedal, ouch gets old. Going wider is also safer when you get sand, debris, glass and other junk left on the pavement. Going wider is absolutely better if that packed dirt turns a little muddy or slick after a rain or even when that pavement gets slick with rain. Trust me, it takes surprisingly little to trip up a narrow tire road bike and bring you down. Been there, done that. Then, too, every time I've ventured into a new area with no idea of what I'll encounter for roads, I feel MUCH more confident when I'm riding wider tires. That's why the wider tire bikes are called adventure bikes or touring bikes.

    Again, going light is nice and always tempting, but the more miles I've ridden over the years, the more I value comfort and safety on the long rides.

    I've been eyeing a Norco Reach steel 105 700x40 bike. Right at that $2000 US price point. It's not available, yet, but it has all the stuff I want on a long distance/gravel bike. Norco is a Canadian company, by the way. I run Norco on most of my fat bikes. Very well thought out designs. Love them.
    My daughter has a Norco, it is her 3rd Norco bike.

    I went to a well-stocked Specialized dealer today and had a chance too see everything that I wanted to see. I saw 2018 Ruby (base), 2018 Diverge in several shapes and forms, and a nice surprize in a form of 2017 Dolche EVO Tiagra (it was mentioned above by one of the ladies).
    Ruby is a beautiful bike. There is no doubt about it. The future shock suspension works like magic. But at it's current price of $2500 for Tiagra and mechanic breaks it is rally outside of the budget. Along with Ruby sport (at $2800), which I prefer (although still mechanical breaks, but 105 grupset). The cheapest Ruby with hydrolic breaks is sitting at $3900, it is still 105 groupset, and completely out of question.
    Diverge is OK, I have already tried it yesterday. At $2500 you get future shock,105 and mechanical disks, at $1900 it's Tiagra and mechanical disks. To get hydrolics you would have to shell out shocking $4100, but it is carbon and 105 set.
    2017 Dolche surprized me a lot. First, the fit in size 48 was perfect. We actually had to raise the seat a bit, and at level with the handlebar the bike fit like a glove. It is aluminum and Tiagra, but it has hydrolic disks (cable -actuated, whatever that means)! And currently only $1500.To be honest with you, if it had 105 groupset, I would wheel it out today.
    https://www.evanscycles.com/en-ca/sp...-bike-EV302417
    Last edited by Lady Hamilton; 03-11-2018 at 12:58 PM.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    There are pros and cons to hydraulic and mechanical disc brakes, but they both work just fine. Have and use both on various bikes. Hydraulic gets you better stopping power, but you have to learn how to finesse them. Hit them too hard and quick and you can lose control. Easier to finesse mechanical, but the thing I like most about mechanical that they are very easy to adjust and work on. I can do most of the work on my own. Much easier to work than hydraulic. When hydraulic brakes go out, time to take my bike to the shop.

    Honestly, as much as I rave about 105, the current Tiagra is actually decent, probably on a par with older vintage 105. My Warbird originally came with Tiagra and I rode it for a year and had no complaints. I upgraded to 105 mostly a confidence thing. Can't say the 105 much smoother or quicker. You will be tempted to do the same if you go Tiagra, but if and when you decide to upgrade, I'd recommend bypassing 105 and going straight to Ultegra. I promise you, you will notice a huge difference in smoothness and speed with Ultegra. It will spoil you.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 03-11-2018 at 03:23 PM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    62
    Unfortunately, anything with Ultegra would have to be used. Although, at the bike show I saw gorgeous Wilier road bike with Ultegra in my size 50% off for $2000.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    All of the bikes you mention are awesome, but I think you are right, in that you can probably get a road bike with 25 cm tires and be fine on packed dirt. I have the Silque (albeit, a carbon one) and I have no problem on smoother packed dirt. I am about half an inch taller than you and a couple of pounds heavier, and the Silque is the best fitting bike I've owned. I am on a 47 cm Silque, and I switched out the Trek bars for the Specialized short and shallow ones I've used for years. Specialized's sizing is different and I am pretty sure I would need a 44 cm Ruby. My friend, who is about 5' 2" has the 48 cm Ruby and it seems big to me.
    I gave up trying to find a gravel or cyclocross bike. There's a few new ones for women that are in smaller sizes, but the geometry still comes out wrong for me. And, for a 3d bike, I am not going to spend 4K.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    62
    Yes, there is not a whole lot out there. For instance, the new Checkpoint by Trek starts at size 49 frame, and has a standover of whopping 74 cm. Very few women under 5'3 would clear that. The clearance and the reach of that bike match size 53 WSD Domane!
    Specialized Diverge comes in size 44 and has very tiny specs. I did not have a chance to try it, but size 48 was ok for me to ride and did not feel overly large. I would still get 44, if I were to buy it.

    I think I am steering towards either buying the Dolce Evo I tried yesterday (if they give me the price it was offered at the bike show), or go with endurance road that has disks. There are a few last year's Synapses available with disks and Tiagra (and they are slightly less than Dolce Evo).

    Or, otherwise, I will just wait for this year's Ruby to go on sale later this year. The future shock suspension is amazing, the bike is very beautiful, and fits very-very well. Specialized really went ahead of Trek this year, offering disks on all their bikes. MSRP on Ruby with 105 set is $430 less than comparable Domane. But, Domane has hydrolic breaks.

    As far as comfort on packed dirt, I won't even have to go with 25 tires. Ruby Sport is 28, same is Cannondale Synapse. Trek Domane Disk is 32!

    As far as fit goes, I found Trek Silque S5 47 and Ruby 48 fit very similarly. I wouldn't go down to 44 Ruby. I tried 48 yesterday and with saddle perfectly aligned with the bar both ruby and Dolce 48 are perfect for me. But, my Vita is also S, not XS. My legs and arms are a tad bit longer than average for 5'1.
    Last edited by Lady Hamilton; 03-12-2018 at 10:15 AM.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    Ha, now I want to look at the Diverge.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    62
    You should. It's a nice bike. What I have noticed almost immediately (I was out in the parking lot) is how much better it takes tight turns than my Vita Elite. I find Vita a very snappy bike, very nimble for a hybrid.
    And also, the temptation of Diverge is that it's E5 aluminum, as opposed to A1.
    Diverge 44 will fit you for sure. even 48 is a fairly small bike.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Mrs. KnottedYet
    Posts
    9,066
    Iím your height, 5í0Ē though heavier. Thatíll be another thread. Iím still 175 lbs though since retiring the pants sizes are dropping. I was rocking size 16, now down to 12ís. The goal size is either 10 - maybe 8. Itís what tends to happen with me, weight stays the same and everything turns to muscle when I get fit. Anyway back to the bike;

    My commute may be similar to yours; pavement and bike lanes with some gravel. My favorite commuters are my Salsa Vaya and the Soma Buena Vista the latter of which is a Mixte. Since you want to to cross the Salsa May be a better choice. Equipped with a rack and front and rear fenders itís heavier than some. Test ride without and with lighter wheels.

    I normally ride a 47cm, my Salsa is a 50cm. Iíve had I professionally fit and was surprised by that.

    Hereís another thread for comparison and info:

    http://forums.teamestrogen.com/showthread.php?t=51616
    Fancy Schmancy Custom Road bike ~ Mondonico Futura Legero
    Found on side of the road bike ~ Motobecane Mixte
    Gravel bike ~ Salsa Vaya
    Favorite bike ~ Soma Buena Vista mixte
    N+1 bike ~ Brompton
    https://www.instagram.com/pugsley_adventuredog/

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    62
    Quote Originally Posted by Trek420 View Post
    I’m your height, 5’0” though heavier. That’ll be another thread. I’m still 175 lbs though since retiring the pants sizes are dropping. I was rocking size 16, now down to 12’s. The goal size is either 10 - maybe 8. It’s what tends to happen with me, weight stays the same and everything turns to muscle when I get fit. Anyway back to the bike;

    My commute may be similar to yours; pavement and bike lanes with some gravel. My favorite commuters are my Salsa Vaya and the Soma Buena Vista the latter of which is a Mixte. Since you want to to cross the Salsa May be a better choice. Equipped with a rack and front and rear fenders it’s heavier than some. Test ride without and with lighter wheels.

    I normally ride a 47cm, my Salsa is a 50cm. I’ve had I professionally fit and was surprised by that.

    Here’s another thread for comparison and info:

    http://forums.teamestrogen.com/showthread.php?t=51616
    Thank you.

    Well, sometimes height is not everything. I know women who are 5'3 with shorter legs than mine. So, I am not suprized at all that Vaya 50 fit you. I have looked up the specs, and they're are tiny at their smallest size. Specialized Ruby at 44 is also a very-very tiny bike, that is more for someone who is 5 foot and under. I haven't tried this year's one, but I remember being very cramped on last year's one.

    I have tried just for the heck of it Cannondale CAADX 2016 with 105, priced very comfortably. It's unisex, size 44. Because it is cross bike, and sits very high from the ground, I did not clear the standover, but I was very comfortable in the reach. Basically, while I was on the bike, it was ok. It is a very nice bike and feels like very high quality. Actually, in terms of looks and feel I've liked it more than Diverge...

    Muirenn, I see one in your signiture. Do you love yours?
    Would it be comfortable on a 50-70 mile ride?
    Last edited by Lady Hamilton; 03-12-2018 at 09:53 AM.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    62
    The closest Advocate Cycles store is like an 9 hour drive one way. Unfortunately...
    Of, course, there is always an option to send it to a mailbox storage place in Niagara Falls (has been done with many, many things with lots of items), but I would really hate to buy something without trying it first. I think that the whole fitting and adjusting experience is very important, so I would only go with something shipped if I knew exactly what I am getting.
    Also, one of the Salsa's dealers around offers 0% financing over 12 or 24 months, which really helps to get the bike you want, as opposed to the one you can afford out of pocket.
    I will definitely be checking it out as soon as I can, schedule permitting.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    62
    But I know in the past, it seemed they would not fit someone less than 5'4" or so.
    No, the bike is too high off the ground. Even in size 44, which they no longer make. Now the smallest is what they call 46.
    Last edited by Lady Hamilton; 03-12-2018 at 02:35 PM.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    62
    There is one model this year. With APEX 1 HDR group set. And very pricey. Smallest size is 46 and standover is very tall too, at 75 cm.

    The one I have tried is men's/unisex.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,108
    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Hamilton View Post
    There is one model this year. With APEX 1 HDR group set. And very pricey. Smallest size is 46 and standover is very tall too, at 75 cm.

    The one I have tried is men's/unisex.
    Are you familiar with SRAM road shifters? They are different than Shimano in the way the work. Not everyone likes them. APEX is low end in the SRAM line, quality wise. Definitely not 105 level. I rode with Apex for two years on a Salsa Fargo. I sold the Fargo because it was just too expensive to switch everything over to 105. I get along great with SRAM MTB stuff, but not their road stuff. Just me, though. Some folks love the SRAM road stuff. Not knocking it. Just saying you might want to try before you buy if you haven't ridden with the SRAM double tap road stuff.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 03-13-2018 at 02:52 PM.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,394
    I think I would be one of those people, North Woods. I have a lot of trouble with muscle memory and mechanical/spatial things, and once I learn something, it is difficult for me to switch. Although I went from trigger shifters on a mountain bike to Ultegra with no issue, and shifting has always been intuitive to me, I had an embarrassing experiencing leading a ride a few years ago.I was sweeping the faster group and this younger woman, who was clearly very fit was lagging and as we neared the end of the ride, I realized she had no idea how to shift. She had bought the bike in the fall and this was one of her first rides the next spring. She could barely get up little rises. I only looked at her shifters and assumed they were Shimano... we stopped and I was trying to show her, when I saw the SRAM. I only remembered something about double tap, so I started playing around. I couldn't figure out if it was double tap to go up, down, or both, and having just one lever totally messed me up. Anyway, I apologized for being a bad leader and I was able to get the bike in a lower gear for her, by accident!
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura
    2017 Specialized Ariel Sport

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •