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Thread: November Rides

  1. #46
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    Microspikes are things you pull on over your hiking boots, so you can walk/hike on icy trails or roads. Northwoods was saying she couldn't walk the trails, but could ride her fat bike.
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  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    Microspikes are things you pull on over your hiking boots, so you can walk/hike on icy trails or roads. Northwoods was saying she couldn't walk the trails, but could ride her fat bike.
    Are you still considering a fatbike?
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

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  3. #48
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    May 2013
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    north woods of Wisconsin
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    I do use pull over crampons over my boots to walk the trails in the winter when things get really treacherous and, of course, they're built in to my snowshoes. Kind of clunky, though. Might look into those micro spikes. Sounds like a great idea.

    The fat bikes aren't 100% slip proof, of course. Still have to know how to take tight turns and so on when fat biking on the slick stuff. Also, when things get nightmare bad, I do have two fat bikes set up and ready to go with studded tires. One is for hard pack snow and clean ice. Has shallow lugs to keep more surface area close to the snow pack/ice. Runs very fast. The other is a deep-lugged monster for chewing though the deep, slushy stuff, but it's a slow beast to run.

    Oh, yeah, tire styles and setting the right tire psi to match the conditions is a much needed skill for fat biking. These tires run at very low psi, typically 5 or even a touch less in the winter to about 10 or 12 for the max in the summer, so even one or two psi makes a huge difference in the way the tire performs. Regular bike tire gauges aren't accurate enough, either, so I use a special low psi gauge that only goes up to 30 psi. Even have to be careful to wait until the tires cools to air temperature in cold weather before measuring pressure. Tires will lose pressure going from a warm house to winter cold. Go too low and you get a pinch flat when running with inner tubes. Another reason I'm going tubeless when I can with the fatties.

    Okay, more than anyone probably wanted to know about fat bikes, but they really are different. I'll shut up, now.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 11-13-2017 at 02:42 PM.

  4. #49
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    I really don't think I am going to get one, because it just doesn't snow consistently enough here, and the ones I want (Trek or Specialized WSD), that will fit me are not cheap. I will probably try it at a nordic center this year. When it snows, I want to be x country skiing. Plus, if I was fat biking around here, I'd be on fairly difficult trails. I cannot see putting fat bikes on the rack, to drive 2-4 hrs. to get up north, or to western MA. Does this make sense? Given my poor experience with mountain biking, I think getting something else for my 3d bike would be better.
    What that will be, I don't know. It's pretty much between a gravel/dirt road bike, a city type bike, or a cheap mountain bike to do both of those.
    Northwoods, I used to use snow shoes to go out on hard packed trails with just a couple of inches of snow. It did seem like overkill!
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  5. #50
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    How much do you want to spend? You could get a Salsa Fargo.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

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  6. #51
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    I haven't thought that specifically, Sheila. Frankly, it's not in the budget right now. I am leery about buying any of the Salsa/Surley type brands after trying a couple out at Harris Cyclery a few years ago. Not only did the bikes not feel right for me, there was a kind of weird reverse snobbism in the shop. I feel bad saying that about the hallowed home of Sheldon Brown and it has nothing to do with buying a fat bike, but after almost 20 years of riding, I have found that I feel comfortable on a very small range of bikes. Plus, I really think I would not use a fat bike enough to even justify a 1500.00 or less bike.
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  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    I haven't thought that specifically, Sheila. Frankly, it's not in the budget right now. I am leery about buying any of the Salsa/Surley type brands after trying a couple out at Harris Cyclery a few years ago. Not only did the bikes not feel right for me, there was a kind of weird reverse snobbism in the shop. I feel bad saying that about the hallowed home of Sheldon Brown and it has nothing to do with buying a fat bike, but after almost 20 years of riding, I have found that I feel comfortable on a very small range of bikes. Plus, I really think I would not use a fat bike enough to even justify a 1500.00 or less bike.
    The Krampus feels good to me, but I haven't compared it to other mountainbikes. I just wanted a point A to point B bike. And I think the Krampus has a different feel from Surly's other offerings. There aren't any Salsa dealers near, but the shop where I rented one was nice. That was in Iowa, which typically has good customer service. At least compared to where I live.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 11-14-2017 at 11:29 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  8. #53
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    May 2013
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    Crankin, you do what works for you. Wouldn't ever suggest, otherwise. Love my fatties, but, yeah, if you have to throw one on a rack and drive for a couple of hours to really make the most of one, not a great choice. Oh, for sure, you can use them on roads, too, and I do use my Pugsley that way, but it's still most at home back in the woods.

    Got a chuckle on that Surly comment. Definitely right on that retro snobbishness thing. Have experienced it, myself. Gets a little nutty, for sure. As a Surly fan, I take it tongue-in-cheek, though. I know better. Have the latest and greatest in modern design MTBs/fatties and have a couple of Surly's, too. I know the difference. When I really want to fly, it's not on the Surlys. That's not their niche.

    Our weather continues to be snowy, but at least the temps are holding in the 30s. It'll take a lot more to push me indoors on the trainer.

  9. #54
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    Took the Surly Krampus (steel 29x3 bike) out on the pavement for a spin, today. Our pavement is now snow free, so plenty safe, and I'm running easy rolling Knard tires. Very refreshing ride after all my trail work in the snow and mud with the fat bikes, this month. Weather is still winter-like, with drizzle and temps in the 30s, but figured I better ride clean pavement when I can, now. Last week, our local paved roads were snow covered and will be, again, soon.

    Of course, I still had to try riding the Krampus on the trails. It is a great trail bike with the Knards when the trails are dry, which is definitely not the case, right now. Slipped all over the place in the slush and grease (mud on top frozen ground). Way wrong tires with the Knards. Took the Krampus back to the house and got a fat bike. Still had to go easy in the turns and keep those wheels in the vertical, but the fat bike took it all in stride - as usual.

  10. #55
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    I actually did a group ride today. 35 miles, just local roads, but mostly in the opposite direction of most rides I do.
    There were 40 riders! A lot of the very fast people, who do not ride in the stated style of our group. But, they stayed just ahead of our leader for the first half, then took off, and reappeared when we regrouped. I felt good until about 8 miles from the end, I volunteered to arrow a turn. I had to wait awhile until the sweep came, as the group slowed a lot. Then, it was a hill, the sun went in, and I should have eaten. I struggled to get past this slow group and finally got on the flattish main road back to the start. I was dying! At one point, I was going around 11.8 in places my speed is usually 17-18. I had also found a headwind. Got back to my car and when I stopped, I realized i needed to eat. Drove to the Indian restaurant, where we celebrated our coordinator’s 75th birthday.
    I am
    Exhausted.
    Last edited by Crankin; 11-15-2017 at 05:29 PM.
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  11. #56
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    Glad you were able to finish the ride without eating, Crankin! I always carry a small snack (peanut butter bar or something) even on my usual 33-36 mile rides here, since I only drink water (because of wearing braces). I am able to rinse my mouth out after eating with the water. I like to eat my snack about 2/3 to 3/4 of the way into the ride so I don't get too hungry at the end. I know your rides there are harder because of the hills, so all the more reason to eat at some point along the way.

    We've had a chilly north to northeast wind lately, and it really does slow me down heading into it, but the benefit is a nice tail wind most of the way back, as we're heading south and west. Been riding M-Tu-Th-Fr. On Wed. and Sun. I've started working out at the gym here in the RV park, which really is pretty decent for an RV park. I take my mat for yoga/abs and use their weights for upper body. Saturday we do a long walk to the farmer's market and leave the bike path to the kiddos!
    Emily

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  12. #57
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    Yes, good ride, Crankin. It's those rides that push us a bit that teach us the most. Of course, we don't want to take that thinking too far and end up bonking. (Ask me how I know.)

    Emily, have to say that gypsy lifestyle sounds cool. Not sure its me, though. The older I get, the more of a homebody I've become.

    Been thinking of boots for my winter biking. Since I use flat pedals for all my biking, no need for bike specific shoes. My light thinsulate hiking boots work fine until things get really cold. Then I use cheapo rubber pack boots with liners, but those are a bit on the floppy aide for hard pedaling. May take a look at some of those very high end (and very expensive) winter bicycle boots, even though I don't need the SPD feature.

    The bar mitts have pretty much solved the cold hands part of the problem for me. Can use them with standard winter gloves down to zero and below.

  13. #58
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    Oh, I always have a bar in my bag. I had a really good breakfast for before a ride and was thinking how full I still felt, in a good way. I have found I get a sudden shock of hunger, like instantly, instead of building up. I noticed it about a mile or two before I stopped to do the arrow. I had plenty of time to eat then, and I didn't! My fault. I was drinking a bottle with Nuun mixed in, so just electrolytes, no sugar or protein. It was not a hard ride.
    I was good and did not go to spin this morning (it was raining). I need the rest.
    Northwoods, I have winter cycling shoes, though for road. They are infinitely better than regular shoes or hiking boots, but not for what you do. A long time ago, my husband had some really super insulated mountain biking winter boots. I forget which brand they were, but they are out there. He always commented how warm they were.
    Two guys had bar mitts on their bikes yesterday, but said they were overkill for the 42 degree temperatures. They were just too lazy to take them off.
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  14. #59
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    I did look at some 45NRth winter biking boots, today, but nearly had a coronary when I saw the price. $300 plus for a pair of boots? I might consider such I price if I was still going clipless on the pedals, but I'm not. I now run flats on all the bikes, so the ability to add cleats is not a feature I need. Can't see paying for a feature I'll never use. Also, the boots weighed a ton. I'd be worn out just pedaling with them on a trail without snow. Just nuts. Felt like Frankenstein in them. Couldn't see paying for the boots just because they were bike specific.

    Ended up getting a very similar non-bike specific boot designed for hiking in the snow with the same temp rating, insulation, same sole design, but much lighter in weight and much more comfy, all for less than half the price. Tried them, this afternoon and they worked well with the flat pedals. Problem solved.

    Trails were very icy, today. Temps never got above freezing, so all the slush we had the last couple of days is now pure ice and, worse yet, a lot of it is rutted and uneven. The Dillinger studded tires made it a non-issue, though I had to drop the pressure just a bit. Only need those studded tires, now and then, but when I need them, they save the day. Of course, most people wouldn't be crazy enough to ride icy trails, but I am a little nutty, after all.

    PS. We saw a herd of does trotting though the yard, this morning, all watching their back trail. From experience watching deer, I knew it could only mean one thing. Sure enough, a few minutes, later, a young buck was following them, nose to the ground. That time of year.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 11-16-2017 at 05:16 PM.

  15. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    PS. We saw a herd of does trotting though the yard, this morning, all watching their back trail. From experience watching deer, I knew it could only mean one thing. Sure enough, a few minutes, later, a young buck was following them, nose to the ground. That time of year.
    Cool! I miss having a wooded acreage with deer. Actually, we do still own a small piece of property abutting my folks' mountain vacation home, and there are deer, but we don't get there often. Was just up there in late October and saw a few deer -- we leave field corn out for them when we're there.

    Today's ride was lovely! It was a little warmer (two layers up top to start, took off one at my rest stop) and less windy. We're due a couple more cold fronts over the next week, so this may be the last time I get to wear short sleeves on a ride for awhile (though not all winter; after all, this is Florida!)

    I went over 3000 miles on the year today! Very thrilled with that considering how much time I missed after my accident.
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

 

 

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