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Thread: August Riding

  1. #76
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    Feb 2005
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    I actually asked my DH about which Gatorskins I had last night. I didn't know, because they were on the bikes when I did the builds on both of them. I remember asking the shop(s) to use them, but not the discussion of which kind. They are the folding ones. However, I still wouldn't want to try to get them off or on!
    I might have to try, as yesterday morning I rode through a pile of broken glass on my ride. I checked my tires when I got back and last night, so far, OK, but a little leery of going out alone today. It's raining now, but supposed to clear up and I do want to ride at least 20 miles today. We are leaving for Philly tomorrow, where my younger son and family are temporarily hanging out until they go to Ft. Benning. Decided not to take the bikes, as we want to concentrate on the visit.
    Last edited by Crankin; 08-30-2017 at 10:11 AM.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  2. #77
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    6,479
    Quote Originally Posted by rebeccaC View Post
    Thanks to both of you…I’ve been using Chromes for their rigid sole and grippy rubber but need some new shoes. I remembered an earlier post of yours Sheila (Maybe i misremembered it ) and I thought you might have found a good solution for your Krampus. I'll probably go with Chromes again.

    eta...Emily does that mean no more wiring of the jaw? if so congrats on getting away from blended food!!!!!!!!!!!!!! and hoping it makes things easier for you too.. +1 on thorns and +1 on marathons....i have them on my commuter and they have taken a lot of abuse without any problems
    You didn't misread the earlier post, but the shoes are such a low consideration, I just didn't realize. I used the 5 10's perhaps 3 times. Too squishy and flexible. Hate them. Maybe I should try as regular shoes, though I would never spend the $118.00 I have invested on a simple pair of canvas sneakers. Sigh.

    Psst. There is a lot of variation in Chromes, and I've never tired them. Which do you like?
    Last edited by Muirenn; 08-30-2017 at 09:46 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  3. #78
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    Jun 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    I'm with Sheila on the shoes for flat pedals. One of the big plusses for flats is that you don't need special shoes. Just use what you're wearing, hop on the bike and go. As long as the soles of the shoe grab the pins on the pedal, you're set. I use standard street shoes, sandals, hiking boots, even felt lined pac boots in the winter. One thing I do add to my bikes that is helpful for use with flats is a QR seat clamp, since your inseam changes with different shoes.
    Have you ever tried flat pedals on a CX or CX style bike? I have SPd's on my CAADX. They are okay, I don't like the tiny surface, and the shoes I use are nice and stiff, but weigh as much as a pair of winter boots. Feels like it, anyway. I do have a pair of decent MB pedals in a drawer. (They used to be on the Krampus). They are Diamond Backs, and were not expensive. Maybe I should try them, or get a really good pair of double sided pedals (one side spd, the other BMX). I have a cheap pair of similar on my Le Monde. They are good as far as I am concerned.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  4. #79
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
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    680
    I don't want to get pushy about my preference for flat pedals and by flats I mean thin platform pedals with pins on either side, not the old blocky cruiser pedals we had on Schwinns when we were kids or that are still found on cheaper bikes. My advice for anyone is to try flats if interested, but give them at least a couple of months. At first, there is a feeling of insecurity with not being locked in with SPDs if you've been riding them for years, but it passes as you become familiar with the flats.

    I switched over to good lightweight flats on my road bikes a couple years, ago, now, and in the beginning I kept notes for a month on my average speed on the same long pavement loop with the flats versus my SPDs. Meant a lot of switching pedals on my Trek Domane WSD road bike, but I really wanted know the trade offs. Sometimes even did back to back rides on the same day with the different pedals for the sake of comparison.

    My findings - and I stress that they were my findings for my riding and they may or may not apply to others - is that there was no significant difference in my average speed for the two types. If anything, my speed was a bit higher with the flats. Go figure. I did greatly reduce foot cramps by going with the flats, though, and that was one of the things that lead me to try them in the first place. So many thousands of miles over so many years of my feet being clipped into one single position on the pedals for hours and hours at a time with the SPDs had caught up with me. It was a repetitive stress kind of injury. I couldn't go for more than a couple of hours without my feet cramping and, yes, I changed seats, seat positions, you name it. Very painful.

    The flats cured it, though, by allowing my to move my foot on the pedals a bit, same as moving my hands around on the drop bars reduced hand numbness and fatigue. The cramps disappeared almost immediately, as long as I remembered to keep my feet moving and stretching. Two years, now, many long rides with the flats and no cramps. Don't even think about it, now. Problem solved.

    For trail work, switching from clipless to flats, I did have to adjust my riding style to avoid my feet bouncing off the pedals when not being locked in with eggbeaters as I rode over gnarly stuff. That was actually very easy, though. I now get at least one wheel off the ground when hopping logs and rocks and on some serious drops with me and the bike landing hard with no loss of contact with the pedals. More importantly, flats let me move my feet around on the pedals for technical advantages. I sometimes ride on the balls of my feet when steering though turns for the sake of balance and sometimes even drop a foot to pivot through a really tight twist when I'm getting a little wild with the speed. I then go with the flats of my feet on the pedals for more power when climbing. Huge difference in power. All in all, pretty amazing how changing positions with your feet on the pedals adds to your riding, same as changing positions with your hands on the bars. Going back to clipless would now be a real handicap for me on my MTB riding. No way. And remember, this is all with fully rigid MTBs, no suspension. It's all a matter of technique.

    As for the flats on one side and SPD on the other pedals, totally worthless on the two versions I've tried. Neither side worked as well as a standard all flat or all SPD.

    Again, not telling anyone what to use. Not my style. Sold off all my clipless pedals, though. Flats, only, for this gal.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 08-30-2017 at 10:53 AM.

  5. #80
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    6,479
    Thanks, North Woods. My concern was using flats on the road. I definitely like the flats off-road. That answered it. The flat pedals on my Krampus are very high quality and light weight and just about perfect, IMHO. Plus, they install with a hex wrench. Which I didn't know until I got them. (DMR Vaults, look at their website. ).

    The SPD's on my CX I've always considered kind of blegh. I have the two-sided pedals on my back-up road bike, which I use for commuting. They are fine. Not great. I would consider flats on that bike, but I don't really have any problems except I don't like the heavy SPD shoes I have to go with them.

    I use 3 bolt SPD-SL's on my 'road' road bike. I have to use so many shims due to forefoot varus that I can see trying something else in the future, but not yet.

    So, huh. I think I'll try the inexpensive diamond back pedals I have sitting in a drawer on my CX until I'm ready to spend $150ish on some DMR Vaults. They are pretty good. A little concave and few pins. Just kind of heavy and cheap. I can see going to the DMR vaults on all but the main road in the near future. I just don't consider that the SPD's have any advantage for me.

    Thanks again!
    Last edited by Muirenn; 08-30-2017 at 11:19 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  6. #81
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,144
    I used SPDs at first... couldn't stand the restrictive float. I can see how you had cramps with SPDs, NW. I switched to Speedplay X pedals. They are not even made anymore, but I see no reason to change to the newer version, as you can still get them. I kept SPDs on my mountain bike, which was dumb, since I already was scared to death and never really progressed much, flats would have helped. I had the campus pedals on my Jamis Coda; one side SPD, one side flat. They always flipped over to the unweighted side when I clipped out and I had to kick it over to get back in. However, I did ride that bike twice with the flat side and regular shoes, which was a disaster. In traffic, I had no muscle memory for pushing off unclipped. I have ridden beach cruisers/rental bikes with flat pedals, but with no pressure around me (cars) it was OK. I sold the Coda (wish I hadn't) when I got my Guru. That had Speedplay Frogs, which are great to walk in, but I always seemed to fly out of the left pedal. I read about it on line, there was an issue, mostly because it's so smooth clipping in, you can't hear the little click, so hence, you aren't actually in when you think you are. I bring them for when we go on tours in Europe. When we came back from Spain, we never put them back on the bike, and when I had to ride the Guru over the past month, DH put his old Speedplay Xs on the bike, since he bought the newer version, when he got new shoes.
    I don't like change with any part of my bike! I don't have a good idea of how pins work. Do they stick into some kind of special bottom on a BMX shoe? If I ever get another bike like the Coda for just going into town, I might get flat pedals.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  7. #82
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    california
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    There is a lot of variation in Chromes, and I've never tired them. Which do you like?
    Chrome Kursk’s….the soles are stiff enough for my use and they hold well on the serrated edges of my commuters mks pedals. I do use nylon-reinforced resin strapless toe-clips when doing some of the hills here in town on my commuter too.

    They are very comfortable to walk in. The Pro Kursk has a removable plate for recessed spd compatibility if someone wants that too. The ones I have are a few years old and looking worn now. Sizes run large and I went one size down and they fit well. They also have a nice elastic loop to hold the lace ends securely on the top of the shoe.
    ‘The negative feelings we all have can be addictive…just as the positive…it’s up to
    us to decide which ones we want to choose and feed”… Pema Chodron

  8. #83
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    Jul 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by ny biker View Post
    Glad you were finally able to get back out and ride. When my sister had braces back in the day, she always ate scrambled eggs for dinner on days when she went to the orthodontist.
    We're having Mexi-eggs tonight, in fact! Yesterday I was quite sore and had salmon and quinoa/kale for dinner. Less sore today - yay!
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

  9. #84
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
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    680
    Some MTBs and fat bikes, even on the higher end models, are now coming with good flat pedals. I use the Expedo Spry on a couple of bikes and like them. Great pedal for the money and very light. These are the pedals I was using on the road bikes. Also having some cheap Giant plastic flats with pins that are not removable/replaceable, but as cheap as they are, I'll just replace them when the pins wear down too much. Have had very little wear on them, though, after a lot of hard use.

    I don't get too excited about spending big bucks on my MTB flat pedals, though. In our rocky trails, they get beat up pretty bad. Of course, I could say that about mountain biking in general. If you're afraid of getting any part of your MTB all scratched up, you are in the wrong kind of biking. Honestly, though, for all the trail miles my MTBs have done, they show very little for wear and tear, even some of my oldest MTBs.

    I do keep bucket of water outside the door, filled with slightly soapy water and a large car wash size sponge, though. Pretty simple and quick to give a muddy fat bike a bath before bringing it in the house. (We have a large, enclosed sun porch, which very quickly became my bike room. )
    Last edited by north woods gal; 08-31-2017 at 07:53 AM.

  10. #85
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    6,479
    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    Some MTBs and fat bikes, even on the higher end models, are now coming with good flat pedals. I use the Expedo Spry on a couple of bikes and like them. Great pedal for the money and very light. These are the pedals I was using on the road bikes. Also having some cheap Giant plastic flats with pins that are not removable/replaceable, but as cheap as they are, I'll just replace them when the pins wear down too much. Have had very little wear on them, though, after a lot of hard use.

    I don't get too excited about spending big bucks on my MTB flat pedals, though. In our rocky trails, they get beat up pretty bad. Of course, I could say that about mountain biking in general. If you're afraid of getting any part of your MTB all scratched up, you are in the wrong kind of biking. Honestly, though, for all the trail miles my MTBs have done, they show very little for wear and tear, even some of my oldest MTBs.

    I do keep bucket of water outside the door, filled with slightly soapy water and a large car wash size sponge, though. Pretty simple and quick to give a muddy fat bike a bath before bringing it in the house. (We have a large, enclosed sun porch, which very quickly became my bike room. )
    I'll look into some less expensive flats. The DMR's work so well, though. May get at least one more set. So far, mine are not scratched, the anodized finish is tough. I did consider some Shimano flats that were around $70.00, I think. Maybe I should try them.

    What do you think of these? https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...68YWKQI1&psc=1
    Last edited by Muirenn; 08-31-2017 at 10:43 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  11. #86
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,856
    I put the Gatorskin on my rear wheel last night. Then realized the directional arrow was pointing backwards, so I had to take it off and do it again. Also my frame pump no longer works right so I had to buy a new one -- fortunately REI currently has Topeak pumps on sale. Anyway, the Gatorskin was easier to get on and off than the Conti Grand Prix was. Though my hand did slip when removing it to turn it around, and I cut my knuckle on the spoke. Would have been worse if I hadn't been wearing vinyl gloves to keep my hands clean. I hate my tire levers -- they're too thick to get under the bead. On the recommendation of the mechanic at the LBS, I bought thinner metal ones, but they knick up the rim too much so I'm going to return them and look for something else.

    Also I should add that since I changed the tire at home, I used my Kool-Stop to get it back on the rim. I don't bring the Kool-Stop on rides with me and I imagine it would be harder to replace the tire without it. But I do have a VAR tire lever to use on the road (it's smaller and fits better in a bike bag, though it's not as easy to use as the Kool-Stop) and since the Gatorskin seems easier to work with than the Grand Prix, I think I'll be okay.

    Anyway I am really tired of tires. Four flats in 4-5 weeks, two from punctures and two from stem problems. Three of the four were rear flats. I'm finding it harder to get that wheel on and off since I put the mid-cage derailleur on the bike.

    Re: pedals -- what's this about no more Speedplay Xs? Good thing I have an extra set of cleats at home.

    I put cheap flat pedals on my mountain bike last winter and rode it once around my neighborhood. I had a terrible time get started without my foot being clipped in on the initial pedal stroke, especially on uphills. Haven't had a chance to get out and try it again, though I want to do that soon.

    ====

    Yesterday I helped with road markings for the club's century. It was my first time with this activity. Fortunately I was with people who have done it many times before. It was kinda fun and kinda messy. We had different colors and brands of paint, and the fumes from some were quite strong. My eyes were burning a lot. I felt better after I got home but this morning my head was all congested and my throat hurt. So now I can't tell if I have a cold or if I'm feeling aftereffects from the chemicals. Or maybe it's the new laundry detergent with the strong "fresh scent" that I used for the first time last night and then hung a bunch of clothes on a drying rack in my bedroom overnight. I'm going out for a ride after work tonight and then planning to stop at the store to buy different detergent.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  12. #87
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,479
    I like Parks levers, NY. They are thin and easy to use. The hook helps, too.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  13. #88
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    california
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    1,204
    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    So many thousands of miles over so many years of my feet being clipped into one single position on the pedals for hours and hours at a time with the SPDs had caught up with me. It was a repetitive stress kind of injury.
    Float ftw!!!
    I have speedplay frog ti’s on my road, tour and fixie cuz I like having the float when I need it, the secure and reliable foot retention especially when pulling upward/climbing off the saddle/the high cadence of some fixie rides etc. and of course there’s the comfortable walking off the bike. No problems in the years I’ve used them.

    I have the no longer made Carnac shoes, which has a sole constructed in a way that eliminates any hotspots no matter the length of, long hard climbs on or long headwind grinding it out on the pedals kind of rides.

    Soooo for me…it’s a good thing that my feet and knees feel good even if other parts of my body may be in distress cuz of the ride.
    ‘The negative feelings we all have can be addictive…just as the positive…it’s up to
    us to decide which ones we want to choose and feed”… Pema Chodron

  14. #89
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    680
    Added another 1/10 mile branch on my MTB trails, today. That doesn't sound like much, but, believe me, that is full day of work and heavy work at that. Good section, though, with some hefty steeps that will give me a good workout. May be able to use it as a cross country ski section, too.

    By the way, I do not cut down any large or even small trees, just an occasional seedling. Most of the trail work involves moving debris, raking, trimming over head limbs for the sake of safety, filling dangerous holes and so on. Also involves some cutting of old stumps and fallen dead trees that block the path. Have made an effort to minimize the disruption to our woods. Very little underbrush in our local woods, though, thanks to our overpopulation of deer and we also have an infestation of earthworms - an invasive species for us - that seriously deplete what few soil nutrients we have, so our woods should have more of an understory if truly healthy. The mostly bare forest floor does make it easier on me to lay out trails, but I would rather see my woods a bit more healthy.

    Now at about 2.5 miles of trail on our property if you took all the pieces and strung them, end to end, but in order to actually to access and ride all the pieces, you have to ride over 6 miles with lots of doubling up on sections to access all parts. Usually takes me a full hour of riding, full out, hard, and that includes LOTS of climbing and techy turns and maneuvers. On a good day, I can average over 6 mph for average speed. If I just cruise and/or play with then objects such as logs and rocks, much longer and slower. So many ways to ride the trails, I never get bored. An almost infinite number of combinations. All beautiful, too, with me right there in the midst of it all the sounds and smell and ambience. Life is good in our north woods.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 08-31-2017 at 04:39 PM.

  15. #90
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    Your trails sound really nice, NWG. My husband put in trails on our 11-acre wooded property in NC which also didn't have a lot of undergrowth (lots of deer there too), but I think even if I rode every segment/loop, it couldn't have been more than a mile and a half total for each loop. Our trails were easy by MTB standards, but there was one little hill that was scary descending and a difficult climb up unless you were in the granny gear ahead of time. I didn't ride these trails much since I was almost much more of a roadie, but they were fun at times!

    A couple of similar rides here the past two days on the bike path and roads. Hot and humid with heat index in the low 100s! Today traffic was worse on the roads, heralding the start of the holiday weekend, but the trail was not bad since the kiddos still had school. 27 miles yesterday and 29 today.

    Ordered a couple of items from Amazon yesterday: A Polar water bottle that I can squeeze to drink from rather than have to use my teeth to open, which is impossible with braces and tender teeth! Also new Conti Gatorskin tires for both me and DH. He decided that riding the Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires we bought for riding out west (goatheads!), where we didn't make it this summer due to my accident, was silly here in Florida. The Contis will save us about 1 lb. of rotating weight for each wheel (when coupled with lighter tubes, as we're also running super heavy bulletproof tubes) and allow us to save the Schwalbes for the next time we actually need them without wearing them out ahead of time. It will be nice to be a bit speedier once we get the new tires installed. I've gotten so used to the Schwalbes that I don't even notice that they are slower. DH just put them on his Trek recently and said he could really tell a difference in his average speed and acceleration. His Contis were well-worn, so it was time for new tires anyway.
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

 

 

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