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Thread: July riding

  1. #61
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    california
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Hike by bike...

    What bike would you get? Fully rigid steel? Or that style bike, but switch out the fork for suspension? A lot of people on Mountain Bike Review forums do that.
    Alex and I have talked about it and she likes the idea of learning the technical/technique aspect of it too. You, NWG’s adventures and especially Sky’s baja trip have got me thinking more about it though. I’ll put more thought into it when I get back home. If I do and have questions I know some on this site are good resources…

    It could be an interesting change from the long, steady and sustained hard efforts that my road bikes have addicted me to….and as a friend says, she likes it for its exercise while being in nature drug free antidepressant qualities
    ‘The negative feelings we all have can be addictive…just as the positive…it’s up to
    us to decide which ones we want to choose and feed”… Pema Chodron

  2. #62
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    630
    Give it a try, Rebecca. It's not better than road biking, just a very different kind of bicycling, not just in terms of technique and equipment, but also the physical conditioning involved. Kind of like doing wind sprints versus long distance running. Both are good workouts in their own way.

    I still ride pavement, too, so there's a place for both in my biking, but, yeah, being able to ride trails right in my backyard means I do more MTB, now. I try to add at least two 20+ mile road rides, each week, though, because, as I said, it is a different kind of physical conditioning. Speaking of which, the new Krampus is due to get some road miles, this week. About ten miles out on the pavement, I have a nice set of gravel roads to ride.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 07-25-2017 at 08:03 AM.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,824
    Catching up. Beautiful photo of Banff, Shootingstar. Looks like a great place to visit.

    Thanks very much for the saddle info, Sky King. I moved it back a millimeter for my ride on Sunday and that has helped significantly. It still feels too nose-up though, and is pushing my shorts up into my crotch. Very annoying. But when I finished my last ride and looked at it, it was clearly tilted down. It definitely was not like that when I started the ride. I thought maybe the bolt wasn't tight enough and it tilted when I hit a bump while riding. But when I went to adjust it last night, the bolt was so tight I couldn't budge it. (Note to self: ask the guys at he LBS not to tighten it so much that I can't loosen it to make adjustments on my own). Also when I checked it with a level last night it was not tilted. So I will hopefully go out and ride again tonight and see what's going on with it.

    I say "hopefully" because this morning I discovered the rear tire is flat. I had the bike upside-down last night while I cleaned it and lubed the chain. You'd think I would have noticed the flat then. But no. By the time I get out of work and am able to fix it tonight, it will probably be dark. I looked the tire over quickly this morning and saw several small cuts where glass could have cut through. It will be nearly impossible to find any lurking bits of glass in the dark. Who knows if I'll actually ride tonight or if I will just end up sitting under a streetlight cursing my tire.

    Anyway. In spite of the saddle-nose-tilt problem and whatever glass I rode through to cause the flat tire, I rode about 45 miles on Sunday and overall had fun. A friend was leading the ride, and he cross-posted on the schedules of two bike clubs. Most of the people who showed up are not familiar with the area where we rode, though I know it well (and in fact I had designed the route, a couple of years ago). Most people also rode ahead on their own and we rarely or never saw them during the ride. However there were a couple of people who needed help in the last segment of the ride, after the final rest stop. One did not have a cue sheet, and as I talked to him I got the impression that he had some sort of mild cognitive disability. I was happy to ride with him to make sure he didn't get lost, but he kept crowding me and wouldn't ride single file when there were cars behind us, like he was too afraid that I'd drop him. I was starting to sound annoyed with him and didn't want to be annoyed, for his sake as well as mine. And there were two other people who needed help -- one who got dropped on every hill, and another who was riding with him so was stopping periodically to regroup. So I pulled the guy with no cue sheet up to the ride leader and announced that I was dropping back to help the slower riders. It was good that I did that, because they attempted a short cut and would have gotten lost if I hadn't found them. I led them back using a shorter route to cut a few miles from the total. They were extremely appreciative. So at the end of the day we had a bit of drama but enjoyed a scenic bike ride. After we finished I stopped at a nearby sandwich place to get something to eat, and just as I was about to leave it started to rain very heavily, and continued to come down in sheets for about 20 minutes, leaving huge puddles on the roads. I was very glad to have finished the ride before the rain started.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,448
    Spoke to the Surly dealer in Charleston, we discussed the pros and cons of Krampus versus Karate Monkey, and I'm going with Krampus. They can't get one in a size medium until December. Not a problem. I can save the rest of the money I'll need to buy a new frameset, pay for a rebuild, and paint job. Because the shop manager had his Straggler painted by someone in a town just north, huge selection of colors, add sparkle etc. Powder coat and clear coat for $100.00 for a frame (not including fork, so that would be a little more). Everything was blocked of properly that shouldn't be painted. Very professional job. Yeah. The flat red was the thing that bothered me: my drivetrain and other accents are deep, metallic orange. I think a deep, metallic blue, with perhaps some other color on the fork or somewhere to pull in the drivetrain and other accent colors (rainbow pedals). The orange was perfect with metallic emerald green. But I could actually improve things! Yippee! I can save money by taking the new frameset to be painted before having it built.

    Plus, my birthday is in December, so I can totally justify this!!!!!
    Last edited by Muirenn; 07-26-2017 at 01:43 PM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,100
    NY, that was very nice of you, and people are usually appreciate of those efforts. Murienn, sounds like you have a plan.
    I finally rode today, all of 8 miles, my first ride since my trip to the Berkshires. I was going to do a 25 mile ride in the morning and go out with friends for lunch. Then, another friend's dad died, so I went to the funeral with one of the 2 people I was supposed to go out with. I had planned and got ready for a 5 AM ride, despite the fact it was 50 degrees out. But my alarm woke me up and that is a sign I need to sleep! So, I did. After the funeral, my friend and I and one other person went out to lunch in the city I grew up in. So, I didn't get home until 2, I was not really motivated, so getting out for 30 minutes or so was fine.
    Tomorrow is tabata, Friday, I am co-leading a ride. Looks like rain Saturday AM, and then my granddaughter is coming for the afternoon, so I will probably do another tabata class. Hoping for a 50 mile ride on Sunday.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
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  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,448
    Never heard of Tabata, Crankin. Sounds interesting. NY, glad you made it before the rain. We've had downpours, lately.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,448
    Question to North Woods: how does one use a dropper post? You move it up and down while doing steep inclines?

    How does this work? The new Krampus will take a dropper post. No idea if I'd want one.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  8. #68
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    630
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    Question to North Woods: how does one use a dropper post? You move it up and down while doing steep inclines?

    How does this work? The new Krampus will take a dropper post. No idea if I'd want one.
    Correct, descending, railing around turns at high speed, landing after going airborne. Basically, any time you want to get down lower than what a fixed seat allows. Some are activated with button on the seat, but the better ones are activated with a button or lever on the handlebar, hence the routing thing.

    It's something to consider if you are doing difficult single track with lots of steeps and drops, riding over boulder fields and the like. I personally have never felt the need for one and I do some fairly steep drops, though this is hardly mountain country. In real mountain country, I might consider one, but even then, that kind of super aggressive stuff down the side of a mountain, both wheels off the ground, over what some wouldn't even consider a trail is out of my league. Might get there, someday, but not there right now. At this point, I'd rate myself as an intermediate or advanced intermediate single track rider (one wheel off the ground) and though our trails can be a bit rocky at times, nothing I can't manage without resorting to a dropper post. I tend to keep my seat lower on my trail bikes than on my road bikes, anyway, and that works, fine. I can tuck down very low when needed. Might be fun to try a dropper post, sometime, and knowing me, I probably will, but for now I'd be much more inclined to put my money in other kinds of upgrades. Something you can always add, later.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 07-26-2017 at 03:41 PM.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,100
    Tabata is a high intensity interval training class. 45 minutes of the hardest stuff you can imagine. It's different every time, combo of cardio and weights. Usually 8 sets of 4 exercises each. 45 seconds of each one, with a minute rest between each set.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,448
    Thanks Northeood. So it won't be a waste to invest in a new Thompson normal seat post when I get a new frameset. Seatpost diameters changed, unfortunately. It's the only piece of equipment that won't transfer to a new bike.

    Sounds like an interesting class, Crankin. Don't know of any around here.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 07-26-2017 at 04:53 PM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  11. #71
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    630
    Thompson makes a great seat post. Have several. Quality item.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,448
    Yes. The Thompson on my current Krampus is impressive. But the diameter is 27.2, and the new Krampus (and Karate Monkey) is 30.9.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  13. #73
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,824
    They have Tabata classes at my gym. I think they do them up on the roof during the summer.

    So I did manage to get out and ride last night. As usual I got out of work late, so it was around sunset when I reached my ride start (a community center) and got everything out of the car. Removed the rear wheel with the flat tire, spread all the tools out in the back of the car, got a spare tube from my gear bag. Noted the location of the tire logo relative to the valve stem. Struggled to get the tire off the rim, I think maybe I should get better tire levers. Pulled out the tube, pumped air into it, searched for the hole, no luck. It was too slow a leak. Put on my reading glasses, got out my daytime blinky headlight, set it to steady beam, used it as a flashlight as I inspected the tire. Didn't find any cuts or anything sharp on the inside. Did find numerous small cuts on the outside. Scratched a couple of tiny pieces of glass out of two of the cuts. Checked the rim tape inside the wheel. Put a new tube in, struggled to get the tire back on the rim. Made sure the tire was situated with the same logo lined up with the valve stem, for reference. Pumped it up. Took a restroom break. When I returned, the new tire appeared fine. Still not confident, though. So I did a few short laps on the roads immediately around the community center. Tire was okay. Headed out on my normal route, but when I reached the next residential neighborhood a mile or so away I decided to so some laps there so I wouldn't be too far from my car if the tire went flat again. Zig-zagged through the streets up a big hill and back down again, four times. Tire still good, ride distance about 6 miles so far. Headed out on the main road for a couple of miles to connect with the flat neighborhoods that I usually ride through on the end of the ride. Did a few laps there. Returned to the community center. Total distance 17 miles, about what I would have done if I'd ridden my normal route, but with fewer hills. So glad I've learned the roads well enough over the years to improvise like this.

    This morning I pumped the bad tube up again and held it under water to find the leak. It was roughly opposite the valve stem. The new tire is still holding air so I think either I removed the offending glass or the cause of the puncture was not stuck in the tire. I will check the tire again tonight with a magnifying glass just in case. And perhaps I will use the bad tube to practice patching tubes, which is a thing I am very bad at.

    We're expecting lots of rain tomorrow and Saturday, so I have a club ride planned for Sunday.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,100
    The other club I belong to (not the one I lead for) is doing a flat century in the cranberry bogs of SE MA on 10/1. DH and I are thinking of doing it. I've done one century, also flat, in 2006, with no real training. I just need to do a few 50-75mile rides and I'll be fine, since all of the rides I do around here are hilly and require time in the saddle.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  15. #75
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    630
    Yeah, no substitute for time in the saddle to prepare for a big ride like that. It's part of my bicycling regimen that needs a little work. One hour of trail riding, every day, is a good workout and very healthy, but that long distance stuff is another type of workout.

    Been riding the Surly Krampus all week and switching back and forth with various bikes for the sake of comparison. The closest bike to the Krampus is my other 29+ rigid, my Trek Stashe. Okay, well, duh! Still, the two are surprisingly different. Shorter chain stays on the Trek, lighter frame and more XC geometry make it a more nimble, agile bike. You might expect a 29+ bike to be kind of clunky in the handling department, but not this one. Reminds me of my old classic 26" MTBs.

    The Krampus, though, amazes me. With the new Knard tires, it's actually a slightly faster bike than the Trek on a straight run. Plenty agile, but not as twitchy as the Trek. Better climber in the steeps and easier to hop logs with it's trail geometry. And that steel? Oh, yeah, what a difference it makes on the rough stuff.

    What is especially noticeable on the Krampus is its ability to track a straight line. This could be the result of it fitting me better than than the Trek, but it is the more stable bike. I used to ride the Trek on 6 to 10 miles of pavement to get to my favorite gravel and sand roads, but the Trek just felt like a mismatch on the pavement as in, what are we doing on this stuff? Get the Krampus out on a road, though, and it begs to cover some miles. I had originally hoped that the Krampus would give me a narrow tire, lighter version of the Pugsley for a do it all, utility bike and looks like I hit the jackpot. The Pugs will still get the call in extreme conditions or when things turn soft and the Pugs can be ridden in all four seasons, but the Krampus will take over for the longer rides until the snow falls.

    Love the Pugs and now the Krampus, too.

 

 

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