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Thread: July riding

  1. #31
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    May 2013
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    north woods of Wisconsin
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    Thanks.

    The saddle is actually not bad. Has enough padding that I could ride comfy in jean shorts or slacks for a quick trip to the grocery store. Worked fine for a grab and go kind of bike. Still have the original Kona saddle, though. Has zilch for padding.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise Idaho
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    1,192
    shhhh, don't tell but we might actually get out for an S24O Friday! It has been such a crazy year between work and weather this will only be our 2nd time. We volunteer for the Owyhee Wilderness close to Boise and our friend, the Wilderness Ranger stopped in and asked if we'd go with him to ride a boundary - oh twist my arm Technically it isn't an S24O as we are base camping but hey I am not going to nikpick, especially as we get to go in the official government vehicle and to an area we have yet to explore. Taking the new Tenkara Fly Rods too. Will post photos!
    Sky King
    ____________________
    Gilles Berthoud "Bernard"
    Surly ECR "Eazi"
    Empowering the Bicycle Traveler
    biketouringnews.com

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
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    632
    Please do. I really miss that country, so very different from where I live now. Lived in Boise for a short time back in the 70s.

  4. #34
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    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
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    632
    Put my two drop bar bikes on consignment at a local bike shop and looks like I already have a nibble on the Salsa Warbird. Not surprised, since gravel specific road bikes are hot products, these days.

    One of the reasons I let the Warbird go was this bike, my 2008 vintage Trek 8000 MTB.


    It was my other bike I used for commuting in my Chicago days during the winter. With an extra wheel set with studded 26" tires, I could change wheels to suit the weather in a jiffy, thanks to disc brakes. That's one of the overlooked advantages of disc brakes, by the way. Changing wheels is much quicker and easier than dealing with center pull brakes.

    As with my Kona, I did a lot of upgrades on this bike. It's a full SRAM X9 with XT crank and I also upgraded the wheels to Bontrager's best aluminum MTB version in the Race Lite. Tires are a very fast Bontrager XR Team Issue. The reason I bought this Trek, however, was the excellent Alpha Red frame. Aluminum frames don't usually get me excited, but this one is really outstanding. It can turn on a dime, yet it tracks as straight as an arrow. This was a real plus for commuting, by the way. I could ride a perfect steady line on the narrowest of streets in heavy traffic, but I could also respond, instantly, to any situation. Definitely a better handling bike in the tight spots than a road bike. The front suspension was also a big plus on some of those crummy Chicago area streets.

    Anyway, I did a 15 mile sprint with the Trek, today, with a couple miles of gravel and some sand and then finished with an hour of serious single track work. The Trek is very nearly as fast as the Warbird on pavement, but, unlike the Warbird, it has the gearing to handle any hill. Actually a pretty decent pavement bike the way it's set up. Not sure I'd want to do a century on it, but I have done plenty of 30 and 40 mile trips on it.

    Compared to the Warbird, though, it's still the better bike on gravel and it can handle some sand, too, though it's no fat bike or plus bike. Best of all, when I get tired of roads, the Trek begs to be ridden on hard-pack single track. It really screams, there. That's something the Warbird could never do.

    I may get another drop bar road bike, sometime, but my mixed bag riding is best served with flat bar bikes on one kind or another. Just not my nature to stay on pavement all the time, I guess. Each to her own, though.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 07-19-2017 at 12:21 PM.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    6,449
    I've got great carbon, aluminum, and steel framesets. Love them all.

    I like going on and off-pavement, too. Though I'm more hiking by bike than true mountainbike riding. Sometimes I do what little single-track we have. But no one else mountainbikes around here, and I feel like I need some input from experienced riders to really progress. My CAADX sure gets a varied workout. It's commuter, road, gravel, and sometimes single-track. Though since getting a Krampus, single-track has gone away for the CAADX. Who knew, the Krampi does much better on roots...
    Last edited by Muirenn; 07-20-2017 at 10:57 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  6. #36
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    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
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    Great minds think alike, Sheila. The Warbird got sold, so we just ordered a Krampus! I also ordered a set of Surly Knard tires for more all around riding. The Krampus now comes with Surly Dirt Wizards. That's a very aggressive tire with heavy tread, designed for serious trail crunching, but way too clunky for road work. Besides, I already have the heavy duty trail thing covered with other bikes.

    Was going to order the Surly ECR, but that one is out of stock and no date on availability. Apparently, Surly is doing some design changes. Just as well, since the ECR is really a heavy duty "load up the bike with packs" and head into the wilderness kind of bike. The Krampus is a lighter built bike, designed specifically for trail work and general riding, which is really more what I do, though I do dream about heading out on an expedition like Sky is planning to do. Not likely to happen, though, since I'd have to do that kind of extended trip without my husband. It's way beyond his capabilities.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,192
    I ride the Rivet Independence on my Gilles Berthoud touring bike and I have the Rivet All Road on my Surly ECR. They do not soften like a Brooks or a Gilles Berthoud. Note the underneath has the fabric (for lack of a better word) that restricts the sag and splay factor the Brooks tend to do. Also the leather "tie" underneath will keep it stiffer. My independence with the slot is softer than my all road as it does have some give around the slot. I hope you like them. Hopefully the fitter knows that mounting a leather saddle isn't that same as other saddles. You'll want the nose at least level or slightly tilted up. For sure NO NOSE DOWN. These saddles are slippery, another comfort factor so the last thing you want is to be sliding forward. Having a nose tilt keeps your sits where you want them. Given the hardness I am certainly aware of my sit bones after a long day of riding but the next day I can get right back to riding without pain.
    Can't wait to hear the results!

    oh on conditioning - I have never conditioned either of them. One is 3 years old the other is almost 2. If we are out overnight, I do cover them and if it is raining I cover them as well.
    Sky King
    ____________________
    Gilles Berthoud "Bernard"
    Surly ECR "Eazi"
    Empowering the Bicycle Traveler
    biketouringnews.com

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    Great minds think alike, Sheila. The Warbird got sold, so we just ordered a Krampus! I also ordered a set of Surly Knard tires for more all around riding. The Krampus now comes with Surly Dirt Wizards. That's a very aggressive tire with heavy tread, designed for serious trail crunching, but way too clunky for road work. Besides, I already have the heavy duty trail thing covered with other bikes.

    Was going to order the Surly ECR, but that one is out of stock and no date on availability. Apparently, Surly is doing some design changes. Just as well, since the ECR is really a heavy duty "load up the bike with packs" and head into the wilderness kind of bike. The Krampus is a lighter built bike, designed specifically for trail work and general riding, which is really more what I do, though I do dream about heading out on an expedition like Sky is planning to do. Not likely to happen, though, since I'd have to do that kind of extended trip without my husband. It's way beyond his capabilities.
    The ECR sounds like a useful bike, but the Krampus sure is fun. You are the only other woman I've heard of who rides one, and that is asking about it on mountainbiker forums, too.

    I do need to swap out my size small for a medium, and I'm trying to decide whether I should buy a complete used medium (often with great upgrades), or just buy a new frameset. The new geometry is slightly more to my liking than the '15 model I have since the seat tube is a bit steeper (works for me). I've looked at a lot of alternative models, but the Krampus's function really does work best for my needs. I've got it set up as a single speed, a used bike would give me gears if I ever want to try them. And the wheelset are Velociety Blunt 35 mm. A used Krampus might have Rabbit Holes, which are cool, and wider.

    But ow, my wallet. Which is why it hasn't yet happened.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    Could be an age thing with the steel, at least in my case. I remember the first mountain bikes and they were all steel. My first road bikes were steel. Aluminum was the new thing, then came carbon and so on. Today, of course, if you want steel, you have to go looking for it. Not much in local bike shops. Those of us who grew up on steel understand and appreciate it for what it is, but marketing is always pushing lighter, more high tech and so on. I'm just grateful we have a down to earth company like Surly that offers steel bikes at an affordable price. Otherwise, I'd have to go looking custom and that gets expensive in a hurry.

    As for your situation, we know that it's always cheaper to buy a complete bike, but only as long as it has the components you want or at least components you can live with. Otherwise, you may as well just go frameset and build the way you want.

    The current Krampus now has solid 40mm Alex MD rims. No rabbit hole 50mm rims as on my Trek Stashe. That'll mean slightly narrower tire width with the same tires, but that might be a plus for some road work. We'll see.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,192
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    The ECR sounds like a useful bike, but the Krampus sure is fun. You are the only other woman I've heard of who rides one, and that is asking about it on mountainbiker forums, too.

    I do need to swap out my size small for a medium, and I'm trying to decide whether I should buy a complete used medium (often with great upgrades), or just buy a new frameset. The new geometry is slightly more to my liking than the '15 model I have since the seat tube is a bit steeper (works for me). I've looked at a lot of alternative models, but the Krampus's function really does work best for my needs. I've got it set up as a single speed, a used bike would give me gears if I ever want to try them. And the wheelset are Velociety Blunt 35 mm. A used Krampus might have Rabbit Holes, which are cool, and wider.

    But ow, my wallet. Which is why it hasn't yet happened.
    The new Krampus is such a great bike, we've sold several. I agree to a tire switch for the type of riding you do. I had knards on my ECR but now have Maxxis Chronicles and LOVE them. Not sure why, but with the new Karate Monkey and the new Krampus folks are tending to buy up in size. My DD bought the KM and she went with a medium (also changed her tires) and likes it. In an ECR she'd be a small. As you know, love my ECR. New models coming out mid-August. They are being introduced at Saddle Drive the first of August. Bummed we couldn't make it happen to attend.

    Keep us posted!
    Sky King
    ____________________
    Gilles Berthoud "Bernard"
    Surly ECR "Eazi"
    Empowering the Bicycle Traveler
    biketouringnews.com

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Quote Originally Posted by Sky King View Post
    The new Krampus is such a great bike, we've sold several. I agree to a tire switch for the type of riding you do. I had knards on my ECR but now have Maxxis Chronicles and LOVE them. Not sure why, but with the new Karate Monkey and the new Krampus folks are tending to buy up in size. My DD bought the KM and she went with a medium (also changed her tires) and likes it. In an ECR she'd be a small. As you know, love my ECR. New models coming out mid-August. They are being introduced at Saddle Drive the first of August. Bummed we couldn't make it happen to attend.

    Keep us posted!
    Are you saying I might need a large? I have Maxxis Ardents on the bike, 2.4 in the front, 2.25 in the rear.

    North Woods, What size Krampus did you order? Seems like you are taller than me, maybe 5'10"? I'm 5'7" with a long inseam and long arms.
    Last edited by Muirenn; 07-21-2017 at 05:18 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  12. #42
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    I went with a medium on the Krampus, though I could probably do a large, too, as far as my legs go, because I have a very long 34" bike inseam. The problem for me, though, is at the other end with my shorter reach to the handlebars. This is exasperated by my preference for riding far back on the seat for so much of my trail riding. Going large, then, always means going to a shorter stem. That worked in the old days when handlebar stems on MTBs tended to be longer. These days, stems are going shorter and shorter, so I have to resort to other tricks if I try a large. For instance, on my Pugsley, which is my only large bike frame, I went with a shorter stem and a Jones H Loop bar, which sweeps back for an easy reach. It works.

    Overall, the way the geometry keeps changing on trail bikes is making it harder for me to predict the right size - top tubes are getting longer, stems shorter. The medium Krampus, though, works, nice. Haven't had to change anything, other than going to a narrower handlebar. Me and my short arms do not get along at all with these ever wider handlebars. 760mm? Good grief. That's just nuts.

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    I went with a medium on the Krampus, though I could probably do a large, too, as far as my legs go, because I have a very long 34" bike inseam. The problem for me, though, is at the other end with my shorter reach to the handlebars. This is exasperated by my preference for riding far back on the seat for so much of my trail riding. Going large, then, always means going to a shorter stem. That worked in the old days when handlebar stems on MTBs tended to be longer. These days, stems are going shorter and shorter, so I have to resort to other tricks if I try a large. For instance, on my Pugsley, which is my only large bike frame, I went with a shorter stem and a Jones H Loop bar, which sweeps back for an easy reach. It works.

    Overall, the way the geometry keeps changing on trail bikes is making it harder for me to predict the right size - top tubes are getting longer, stems shorter. The medium Krampus, though, works, nice. Haven't had to change anything, other than going to a narrower handlebar. Me and my short arms do not get along at all with these ever wider handlebars. 760mm? Good grief. That's just nuts.
    My Krampus has Jone H Loop bars. Making the size small even more of a problem. I'm 5'7" with a 33.3 " inseam and 21 inch arms. I use a zero-offset seatpost, with the seat jammed as far forward as possible. That makes a huge difference in fit, makes a bigger than expected bike necessary, I think. Are you taller than me? Maybe it doesn't really matter! We use opposite offsets on the seatposts, and arm lengths.

    I spoke to a place that can change out my frameset for a new one, they have the scan machine to predict correct sizing. That is $50.00. Wonder if it is worth it? Or I can use a different shop in another city, skip the scan, and just hope medium is correct. Not sure how good they are with fits.

    Won't change the wheels until later. The wheels I have were purchased because they were a good price. And I just changed out the drivetrain and wheels on my roadbike. So...
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  14. #44
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    I'm 5'9", but I think the whole fit problem is complicated with riding style, especially on MTBs and trail bikes, because riding styles differ so much. I tend to be very fluid in my trail riding, constantly changing position on the pedals, the handlebars, the seat and so on. I'm standing, crouching, leaning, always moving. I like a lot of flex in my elbows for the sake of steering and absorbing shock. I find that the medium frame allows me the widest range of movements. Going to a large frame locks me in a bit more. For instance, on my Pugsley, which is a large, my range of movement seems more limited when on the trail. I do okay with it, but it lacks the playful spirit of a medium frame. The Pugs works great as a road bike, though, because I'm settled in to one position, more or less.

    The medium frame Krampus is the better trail bike for me. It let's me play more with various positions on the trail, just like my other bikes which are all medium. I also find a medium frame bike easier to lift when hopping logs and climbing rocks than the large frame. Seems like I can't get quite the leverage with the larger frames.

    In other words, not sure how much of my trail riding fit experience transfers over to someone else's. I think with road bikes and pavement riding, things are more of a constant. Trail riding is such a mixed bag. Really hard to make recommendations on fit. Over the years, though, with me being on that medium/large border, I've tended to go with medium on my MTBs.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 07-21-2017 at 11:48 AM.

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    6,449
    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    I'm 5'9", but I think the whole fit problem is complicated with riding style, especially on MTBs and trail bikes, because riding styles differ so much. I tend to be very fluid in my trail riding, constantly changing position on the pedals, the handlebars, the seat and so on. I'm standing, crouching, leaning, always moving. I like a lot of flex in my elbows for the sake of steering and absorbing shock. I find that the medium frame allows me the widest range of movements. Going to a large frame locks me in a bit more. For instance, on my Pugsley, which is a large, my range of movement seems more limited when on the trail. I do okay with it, but it lacks the playful spirit of a medium frame. The Pugs works great as a road bike, though, because I'm settled in to one position, more or less.

    The medium frame Krampus is the better trail bike for me. It let's me play more with various positions on the trail, just like my other bikes which are all medium. I also find a medium frame bike easier to lift when hopping logs and climbing rocks than the large frame. Seems like I can't get quite the leverage with the larger frames.

    In other words, not sure how much of my trail riding fit experience transfers over to someone else's. I think with road bikes and pavement riding, things are more of a constant. Trail riding is such a mixed bag. Really hard to make recommendations on fit. Over the years, though, with me being on that medium/large border, I've tended to go with medium on my MTBs.
    Most of the manufacturers recommend a medium for a 5'9" rider (at the moment, anyway), and they claim a 5'7" rider should be on a small. 5'10" is iffy. Good to know.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

 

 

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