Welcome guest, is this your first visit? Click the "Create Account" button now to join.

To disable ads, please log-in.

Shop at TeamEstrogen.com for women's cycling apparel.

Results 1 to 15 of 85

Thread: July riding

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    677

    July riding

    Hope those who can ride are still riding, despite the summer heat. That has not been a factor for me, up north, here, but I know it has been for many. Please be careful folks.

    I have been riding, daily, as always. My minimum, now, is one hour of trail work with lots of leg burner climbs, followed by stunt stuff, i.e. log hopping and rock climbing. Recently, have been adding a short 10 mile pavement ride, afterwards as a way to cool down and add a little balance to my riding.

    Ran into a bit of snag, though. Traded a trail bike for my Salsa Warbird road bike, one day this week, to finish my workout and after only 10 miles of pavement work on this drop bar bike, my old chronic back pain returned. So did my numb hands and all the other issues I used to get when riding many thousands of miles on road bikes in the old days. Didn't result in a pinched back nerve that forced me to cut back on drop bar bike riding in those days, but the pain was there, again. Not good.

    Just to be sure it wasn't a fluke, the next day I did my entire workout on the Surly Pugsley fat bike, including the 10 mile road session. Yeah, the Pugs was slower and seemed I did more pedaling, but arrived back home with no back pain and no numb hands.

    At this point I need to decide if it's worth it to mix these two different types of bikes in my riding. Figure I have only so many years of hard riding left and I don't want to aggravate those old repetitive stress injuries. I'm leaning towards going flat bar for all my biking, even my road biking. Have done it, before. We'll see.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 07-05-2017 at 08:09 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,476
    Maybe you need a new bike fit for that old Warbird...

    Is it really the drop bars that bother you? Or a low stack?
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    677
    Good question. Not one to give up, so tried a few things on the Warbird, today. I switched to a shorter stem, raised the angle of the handlebars to better reach the hoods and moved the seat forward, a bit. I then did the same 10 mile ride after my MTB workout.

    It did seem to help. No back pain when I got home, though still some numbness. Noticeably reduced hand numbness, too. Probably on the right path, since my average speed improved, too. Even did a little half mile of sandy road to practice dealing with fishtailing in the soft stuff, which is a must for riding a 700x35 bike on gravel and that, after all, is what the Warbird is designed to do. I like the bike and have put a lot of work into it. Jury is still out on this one.

    My Trek Domane WSD, though, should go to someone who will use it, so it will get sold or traded. The Warbird does equally well on pavement, but can also go off pavement, which, of course, the Domane cannot. A pavement only bike is just not very useful for my riding.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,142
    So, my bike trip was over Monday. It was hard, but I did every mile. We had one day of rain and 40 degrees, where we were up in the mountains, and we did not ride. Although this was a day of almost all descending, I was glad, in a sneaky way. I hate mountain descents and this gave me 2 rest days in a row. None of the other participants had any rain gear, or barely a wind jacket. Really dumb! I used my leg and arm warmers more than once.
    We did one 10k climb that was hard, but what I expected. There were 2 other 3-4 mile climbs that were similar. But the hardest climbs were in the second to last day and the last day. The last day had 2 very steep and shorter climbs, one where we were on a narrow road with "pilgrims" doing the Camino trek. The bike I was riding had one less lower gear on the cassette as my Trek and 2 less than my Guru. I was dying, and you know it is bad when you are going so slowly, your GPS shuts off! After that last climb, we rode into Santiago, which was hairy, but then we got off and walked our bikes. It was about 100 degrees out and since I could have cared less about the pilgramage aspect of the end of the trip, I just wanted to get to the hotel. That imvolved walking our bikes up a street with about a 20% grade.
    This was definitely our best bike tour yet. I love Spain and we are going to try and get some friends to join us for a private tour of Porto, Portugal, so the owners of the tour company can use it as the basis for a future tour. They are like family, such a different experience than Trek Travel. Not that they are bad, but this is so different.
    We rode 186 miles, with 18k ft of climbing.
    On Tuesday, we drove back to Bilbao from Santiago, stopping in a beautiful seaside town for lunch. Then we had like a 25 mile descent into Bilbao, on the freeway; it made me dizzy! Sort of the reson I hate mountain descents on my bike. We've spent the past 2 days soaking up the culture and eating. Heading back to Boston tomorrow.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,476
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    So, my bike trip was over Monday. It was hard, but I did every mile. We had one day of rain and 40 degrees, where we were up in the mountains, and we did not ride. Although this was a day of almost all descending, I was glad, in a sneaky way. I hate mountain descents and this gave me 2 rest days in a row. None of the other participants had any rain gear, or barely a wind jacket. Really dumb! I used my leg and arm warmers more than once.
    We did one 10k climb that was hard, but what I expected. There were 2 other 3-4 mile climbs that were similar. But the hardest climbs were in the second to last day and the last day. The last day had 2 very steep and shorter climbs, one where we were on a narrow road with "pilgrims" doing the Camino trek. The bike I was riding had one less lower gear on the cassette as my Trek and 2 less than my Guru. I was dying, and you know it is bad when you are going so slowly, your GPS shuts off! After that last climb, we rode into Santiago, which was hairy, but then we got off and walked our bikes. It was about 100 degrees out and since I could have cared less about the pilgramage aspect of the end of the trip, I just wanted to get to the hotel. That imvolved walking our bikes up a street with about a 20% grade.
    This was definitely our best bike tour yet. I love Spain and we are going to try and get some friends to join us for a private tour of Porto, Portugal, so the owners of the tour company can use it as the basis for a future tour. They are like family, such a different experience than Trek Travel. Not that they are bad, but this is so different.
    We rode 186 miles, with 18k ft of climbing.
    On Tuesday, we drove back to Bilbao from Santiago, stopping in a beautiful seaside town for lunch. Then we had like a 25 mile descent into Bilbao, on the freeway; it made me dizzy! Sort of the reson I hate mountain descents on my bike. We've spent the past 2 days soaking up the culture and eating. Heading back to Boston tomorrow.
    I really want to do a bike trip. But is it worthwhile for someone to go on one of these by themselves? Or would I feel like the odd one out?
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,856
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    I really want to do a bike trip. But is it worthwhile for someone to go on one of these by themselves? Or would I feel like the odd one out?
    I've never done one, but from talking to those who have, I've never gotten the feeling that I would be uncomfortable if I went on a group bike tour by myself.

    I am back from my (sedentary) vacation. While I was away I ordered a Rivet Independence saddle which I hope will solve the saddle problems I've been having. I have a bike fit scheduled for Saturday so I really really hope the new saddle arrives by then.

    Last night I did 30 minutes on a stationary recumbent bike at the gym. I guess it was a good workout; this morning at PT I did a 5-minute warmup on a stationary bike and my quads were feeling tired.

    I've been feeling vaguely unhappy that it's July already. Between the ankle problems and the saddle problems I've been missing out on summer. The cloudy windy cool weather during vacation didn't help. Fingers crossed that I'll be able to start riding more now.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,476
    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    Good question. Not one to give up, so tried a few things on the Warbird, today. I switched to a shorter stem, raised the angle of the handlebars to better reach the hoods and moved the seat forward, a bit. I then did the same 10 mile ride after my MTB workout.

    It did seem to help. No back pain when I got home, though still some numbness. Noticeably reduced hand numbness, too. Probably on the right path, since my average speed improved, too. Even did a little half mile of sandy road to practice dealing with fishtailing in the soft stuff, which is a must for riding a 700x35 bike on gravel and that, after all, is what the Warbird is designed to do. I like the bike and have put a lot of work into it. Jury is still out on this one.

    My Trek Domane WSD, though, should go to someone who will use it, so it will get sold or traded. The Warbird does equally well on pavement, but can also go off pavement, which, of course, the Domane cannot. A pavement only bike is just not very useful for my riding.
    I don't know what kind of handlebars you have on the Warbird, but perhaps check into the Salsa Woodchipper or Cowbell bars. The drops flare, could be a good in betweener for your hands. (Wait, you had a Fargo, you know better than me).

    Haven't looked at the Warbird geometry in awhile, but it seems like it was an aggressive build.

    I suppose the Vaya would be a good option. Unless you really do miss your Fargo. I'm the member of a Surly/Salsa used bike group on Facebook that Skyking told me about. A lot of used Fargos on there. What size is the Warbird?
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    677
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    I don't know what kind of handlebars you have on the Warbird, but perhaps check into the Salsa Woodchipper or Cowbell bars. The drops flare, could be a good in betweener for your hands. (Wait, you had a Fargo, you know better than me).

    Haven't looked at the Warbird geometry in awhile, but it seems like it was an aggressive build.

    I suppose the Vaya would be a good option. Unless you really do miss your Fargo. I'm the member of a Surly/Salsa used bike group on Facebook that Skyking told me about. A lot of used Fargos on there. What size is the Warbird?
    I actually replaced the original handlebars with a slightly narrower Woodchipper. Love them. The bike is a 56cm. Have always been a struggle to get a good fit because I'm all legs and need a 55cm or a 56cm for my legs, but then I have to monkey with shorter stems, seat positions and so on to get the right reach to the bars. Old story for me.

    The Warbird geometry is actually endurance for the sake of doing long days of racing in gravel. I rate it about as comfy for distance work as a road bike is going to get.

    Good news is that I woke up this morning after doing a ride on the Warbird, yesterday, and no back pain and no leg numbness, so made up my mind to keep it. We all know how big a hit we take when selling or trading in a used bike. Did check on getting the new Fargo Rival in 27.5+, but they're all sold out. Oh, well.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,142
    There have been single travelers on every bike tour I've been on. Most were women, and no one was left out on any activity. To me, it's a perfect option for a solo traveler. I will describe the solo traveler on this trip, in a future post... it will take too long to do on my phone!
    Sitting in the Bilbao airport, waiting for flight to Paris. Then we have a 5 hr layover. Not a lot of choices flying from Bilbao. We both are exhausted. DH has been coughing the whole trip and I suspect he may have a brochial infection. We must have walked at least 5 miles Wednesday and Thursday. And the eating and wine... we get into Logan at around 8:30 pm, which will feel like 2:30 am to us. Thankfully, we got an offer to upgrade to business class for a very reasonable price and we spent the $! I may have hated all those years DH traveled every week, but it is paying off now, as he has permanant gold status on Delta/Air France. I hope i can sleep, as Lily is arriving for a full day of babysitting at 6:30 am Saturday, while her parents go to a wedding in CT.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,192
    shhhh, don't tell but we might actually get out for an S24O Friday! It has been such a crazy year between work and weather this will only be our 2nd time. We volunteer for the Owyhee Wilderness close to Boise and our friend, the Wilderness Ranger stopped in and asked if we'd go with him to ride a boundary - oh twist my arm Technically it isn't an S24O as we are base camping but hey I am not going to nikpick, especially as we get to go in the official government vehicle and to an area we have yet to explore. Taking the new Tenkara Fly Rods too. Will post photos!
    Sky King
    ____________________
    Gilles Berthoud "Bernard"
    Surly ECR "Eazi"
    Empowering the Bicycle Traveler
    biketouringnews.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    677
    Please do. I really miss that country, so very different from where I live now. Lived in Boise for a short time back in the 70s.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    677
    Put my two drop bar bikes on consignment at a local bike shop and looks like I already have a nibble on the Salsa Warbird. Not surprised, since gravel specific road bikes are hot products, these days.

    One of the reasons I let the Warbird go was this bike, my 2008 vintage Trek 8000 MTB.


    It was my other bike I used for commuting in my Chicago days during the winter. With an extra wheel set with studded 26" tires, I could change wheels to suit the weather in a jiffy, thanks to disc brakes. That's one of the overlooked advantages of disc brakes, by the way. Changing wheels is much quicker and easier than dealing with center pull brakes.

    As with my Kona, I did a lot of upgrades on this bike. It's a full SRAM X9 with XT crank and I also upgraded the wheels to Bontrager's best aluminum MTB version in the Race Lite. Tires are a very fast Bontrager XR Team Issue. The reason I bought this Trek, however, was the excellent Alpha Red frame. Aluminum frames don't usually get me excited, but this one is really outstanding. It can turn on a dime, yet it tracks as straight as an arrow. This was a real plus for commuting, by the way. I could ride a perfect steady line on the narrowest of streets in heavy traffic, but I could also respond, instantly, to any situation. Definitely a better handling bike in the tight spots than a road bike. The front suspension was also a big plus on some of those crummy Chicago area streets.

    Anyway, I did a 15 mile sprint with the Trek, today, with a couple miles of gravel and some sand and then finished with an hour of serious single track work. The Trek is very nearly as fast as the Warbird on pavement, but, unlike the Warbird, it has the gearing to handle any hill. Actually a pretty decent pavement bike the way it's set up. Not sure I'd want to do a century on it, but I have done plenty of 30 and 40 mile trips on it.

    Compared to the Warbird, though, it's still the better bike on gravel and it can handle some sand, too, though it's no fat bike or plus bike. Best of all, when I get tired of roads, the Trek begs to be ridden on hard-pack single track. It really screams, there. That's something the Warbird could never do.

    I may get another drop bar road bike, sometime, but my mixed bag riding is best served with flat bar bikes on one kind or another. Just not my nature to stay on pavement all the time, I guess. Each to her own, though.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 07-19-2017 at 12:21 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,476
    I've got great carbon, aluminum, and steel framesets. Love them all.

    I like going on and off-pavement, too. Though I'm more hiking by bike than true mountainbike riding. Sometimes I do what little single-track we have. But no one else mountainbikes around here, and I feel like I need some input from experienced riders to really progress. My CAADX sure gets a varied workout. It's commuter, road, gravel, and sometimes single-track. Though since getting a Krampus, single-track has gone away for the CAADX. Who knew, the Krampi does much better on roots...
    Last edited by Muirenn; 07-20-2017 at 10:57 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •