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Thread: Advice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Advice

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    I need some advice. I am planning on starting a training program to do a gran fondo in a couple of mos. (the training...the gran fondo will be Spring 2018) and I am going to have a guy from Canada coach me via email. I just bought a new road bike (carbon), and he is strongly suggesting that I purchase a lighter wheel set. The bike has rim brakes (I live in San Diego and with the exception of the last three/four mos, we receive very little rain), so I won't have the added weight the disc brakes would have. It also has Shimano 105 components. Would lighter wheels really make that much of a difference? I am not out for speed--or be the first one in, but I don't want to be crawling in either. Ha, I am 65 years young, and the only person I compete with is myself. I didn't purchase a TOL bike, I bought a bike that was the best that I could afford without having to sell my beloved dogs! �� Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    Last edited by CAS; 04-01-2017 at 02:25 PM.

    Specialized 2017 Ruby SL4 Sport
    Specialized 2010 Sirrus Expert

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    681
    Listen to your coach. 105 grade bikes are usually spec'd with basic, utility grade wheel sets. I was a doubter until I upgraded an early Trek Carbon 105 grade bike I had with an expensive, lighter wheel set, but noticed an immediate difference in average speed. Bike accelerated, quicker, and was more responsive. Almost like getting a new bike. Even if you're not interested in speed, it still means less work over the course of a long day. Was well worth spending the money to do it. I think it's the most effective way to improve performance on a typical 105 class bike.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 04-01-2017 at 05:16 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    Listen to your coach. 105 grade bikes are usually spec'd with basic, utility grade wheel sets. I was a doubter until I upgraded an early Trek Carbon 105 grade bike I had with an expensive, lighter wheel set, but noticed an immediate difference in average speed. Bike accelerated, quicker, and was more responsive. Almost like getting a new bike. Even if you're not interested in speed, it still means less work over the course of a long day. Was well worth spending the money to do it. I think it's the most effective way to improve performance on a typical 105 class bike.
    Thanks! I appreciate your real world experience, which is very helpful.

    Specialized 2017 Ruby SL4 Sport
    Specialized 2010 Sirrus Expert

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    18
    I recently replaced the Mavic wheels on my 2011 Ruby Elite with Shimano RS81 C24 wheels and noticed an improvement in handling as well as acceleration.

    Given that you are a female cyclist, you too will probably notice a decrease in wheel weight. If the weight reduction is meaningful, it should be noticeably easier to accelerate (e.g., taking off from a stop or accelerating into a gust of wind, or going up a hill).

    You don't necessarily have to spend lots of money to get a set of light wheels. On the "BikeForums" and "RoadBikeReview" web sites you can find lots of suggestions for light road wheels. (Among the least expensive and most talked about are the Vuelta wheelsets.)

  5. #5
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    P
    Quote Originally Posted by Jean_TZ View Post
    I recently replaced the Mavic wheels on my 2011 Ruby Elite with Shimano RS81 C24 wheels and noticed an improvement in handling as well as acceleration.

    Given that you are a female cyclist, you too will probably notice a decrease in wheel weight. If the weight reduction is meaningful, it should be noticeably easier to accelerate (e.g., taking off from a stop or accelerating into a gust of wind, or going up a hill).

    You don't necessarily have to spend lots of money to get a set of light wheels. On the "BikeForums" and "RoadBikeReview" web sites you can find lots of suggestions for light road wheels. (Among the least expensive and most talked about are the Vuelta wheelsets.)
    Oh, that's good to know! I have to admit, that when I rode my Ruby for the first time (yesterday), I couldn't believe how hill climbing was so much easier than on my Sirrus. I can only imagine what it will be like to get lighter wheels. I certainly will take your advice by researching on the two websites you suggested. I have surgery next week, so my cycling days will be numbered until I recover. I just love this bike!

    Thank you for your wonderful advice. Everyone who responded has convinced me to upgrade my wheel set.

    Specialized 2017 Ruby SL4 Sport
    Specialized 2010 Sirrus Expert

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    Mrs. KnottedYet
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    8,983
    Quote Originally Posted by CAS View Post
    Thank you for your wonderful advice. Everyone who responded has convinced me to upgrade my wheel set.
    Yes, upgrading wheels may be the single most cost effective upgrade on a bike you love but otherwise want to improve. You decrease rolling resistance while you increase acceleration and usually less weight.

    I'm considering downgrading my wheels somewhat. My road bike has an awesome carbon wheelset. Ultimately we worry about carbon fiber because I've had and ridden the bike for a while and a lot of miles. So I'm researching what would be the lightest, fastest and of course loveliest "standard" wheels.

    My LBS has suggested a few but with tubeless tires and I'm not sure I want to go tubeless. While I tend to have few flats but the idea of having to fix a tubeless flat when in a remote location sounds daunting.

    Of course there's always Uber at that point.
    Custom Road bike ~ Mondonico Futura Legero
    Found on the road ~ Motobecane Mixte
    N+1 new bike ~ Salsa Vaya
    Commuter ~ Soma Buena Vista Mixte

    http://madeinusareviews.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    SoCal
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trek420 View Post
    Yes, upgrading wheels may be the single most cost effective upgrade on a bike you love but otherwise want to improve. You decrease rolling resistance while you increase acceleration and usually less weight.

    I'm considering downgrading my wheels somewhat. My road bike has an awesome carbon wheelset. Ultimately we worry about carbon fiber because I've had and ridden the bike for a while and a lot of miles. So I'm researching what would be the lightest, fastest and of course loveliest "standard" wheels.

    My LBS has suggested a few but with tubeless tires and I'm not sure I want to go tubeless. While I tend to have few flats but the idea of having to fix a tubeless flat when in a remote location sounds daunting.

    Of course there's always Uber at that point.
    Thank you Trek! If I ride for the shear enjoyment, but also want to do gran fondos or century rides, what are the disadvantages of carbon wheels? Our streets are in horrific condition (although, gas tax and car registration will rise to pay for the repairs in California), so, I am kind of flummoxed to the type of wheels (taking into consideration our lousy roads) I should look at.

    Specialized 2017 Ruby SL4 Sport
    Specialized 2010 Sirrus Expert

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by CAS View Post
    Thank you Trek! If I ride for the shear enjoyment, but also want to do gran fondos or century rides, what are the disadvantages of carbon wheels? Our streets are in horrific condition (although, gas tax and car registration will rise to pay for the repairs in California), so, I am kind of flummoxed to the type of wheels (taking into consideration our lousy roads) I should look at.
    To answer to your specific question, check out http://road.cc/content/feature/17111...n-fibre-wheels.

    In general, bear in mind that with bike wheels you can only achieve two of the following three goals: low cost, low weight, high durability.

    When it comes to choosing new wheels, there are several specifications you should consider:
    - material (all aluminum, carbon fiber with aluminum brake track, or all carbon),
    - width of the rim when viewed from head on,
    - rim profile/section (the height of the rim from the bead where the tire mounts to the rim’s shoulder area where the spokes enter),
    - whether you want to run tubeless tires, and
    - and reparability.

    Google for “bike wheel buying guide” if you aren’t familiar with those rim & wheel specifications. Then you can choose new wheels based on your particular needs, wants, and budget.
    2011 Specialized Ruby Elite - my "go fast, go long" road bike
    1997 DiamondBack Expert - old road bike currently serving duty as a gravel bike
    1989 Klein Pinnacle - classic unsuspended mountain bike

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,479
    Quote Originally Posted by Trek420 View Post
    Yes, upgrading wheels may be the single most cost effective upgrade on a bike you love but otherwise want to improve. You decrease rolling resistance while you increase acceleration and usually less weight.

    I'm considering downgrading my wheels somewhat. My road bike has an awesome carbon wheelset. Ultimately we worry about carbon fiber because I've had and ridden the bike for a while and a lot of miles. So I'm researching what would be the lightest, fastest and of course loveliest "standard" wheels.

    My LBS has suggested a few but with tubeless tires and I'm not sure I want to go tubeless. While I tend to have few flats but the idea of having to fix a tubeless flat when in a remote location sounds daunting.

    Of course there's always Uber at that point.
    I'm in the process of changing out my group from SRAM to Ultegra. Wanted new wheels, too, and I almost bought CERO AR30's, but decided to go cheaper (Nice set of Ultegra wheels, much less money). The AR30's aren't overly expensive, but buying the drivetrain plus wheels at the same time necessitated some savings. The reviews on many forums and official review pages are compelling, which is why I even know they exist. I was trying to find out about DT Swiss, and someone recommended these instead. They are super lightweight, and I can see them on your Mondonico. Cycledividion has them for the best price. I don't think they are available stateside.

    https://www.cycledivision.co.uk/cero...-wheelset-2057


    Quote Originally Posted by CAS View Post
    I need some advice. I am planning on starting a training program to do a gran fondo in a couple of mos. (the training...the gran fondo will be Spring 2018) and I am going to have a guy from Canada coach me via email. I just bought a new road bike (carbon), and he is strongly suggesting that I purchase a lighter wheel set. The bike has rim brakes (I live in San Diego and with the exception of the last three/four mos, we receive very little rain), so I won't have the added weight the disc brakes would have. It also has Shimano 105 components. Would lighter wheels really make that much of a difference? I am not out for speed--or be the first one in, but I don't want to be crawling in either. Ha, I am 65 years young, and the only person I compete with is myself. I didn't purchase a TOL bike, I bought a bike that was the best that I could afford without having to sell my beloved dogs! �� Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
    CAS: I ordered this wheel package for my new build: wheelset, set of tires, tubes. It even comes with skewers, though that is not mentioned (which retail for $40.00 per set at other places). And they have a special if you spend $400.00, you get $45.00 off. Prices change frequently, but that means you would need to add just $19.00 worth of stuff to pay a total of $355.00 (I suggest looking at their socks ). I think shipping is $20.00. Those Conti 4 season tires retail for about $120.00 for a set, and good tires are also a big deal. The 4 season tires would be what I'd recommend for your plans, anyway. The wheels are also very pretty and understated. Feel light and very well-made. You have the option of going tubeless, but don't have to do that. (Like Trek 420, I don't like that idea). This is an amazing deal. I've ordered from Ribble intermittently over the years. They are very dependable. Analogous to Performance or Nashbar, stateside.

    http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/shiman...tal-4-seasons/
    Last edited by Muirenn; 06-29-2017 at 05:40 AM.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

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