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  1. #31
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    485

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    Plus one on the kayaking suggestion for anyone with leg or foot issues, but, yes, getting in and out is the challenge. My hubby can't walk or stand for long periods of time and struggles, at times, to get in and out of his kayak, but once in, he loves it. Kayaking is a great sport in its own right. My preferred watercraft is a solo canoe. Pretty much grew up in a canoe. One advantage for a canoe is that getting in and out of a canoe is a much easier thing to do. Does require more expertise as far as knowledge of paddling and paddling strokes, but you can use an extra long double bladed kayak style paddle designed for solo canoeing and do quite well. Not as traditional, but using a double-bladed canoe paddle is easier than using a single blade canoe paddle. I carry both in my canoe.

    Last edited by north woods gal; 03-17-2017 at 04:53 PM.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    IL/FL
    Posts
    3,795
    Only way I can get in or out of a kayak is at wading depth, docks don't work, thankfully not an issue where we are in FL.

    For all you gals that say you can't swim or don't swim well, I dearly wish I could get an hour of pool time with each of you! Swimming is a complicated mix of movements, and one piece of the movement being out of sync is usually what causes the issue... a short time with someone who knows what they're looking for, a bit of coaching, and it almost always fixes the issue.

    Electra Townie 7D

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    12,870
    I find that I can't lift my left arm up and back enough to do the front stroke. I can't float on my back, either. Just sink... Plus, I just hate putting my face in the water. Wearing contacts makes it worse. I can't get them wet, but even after finding jr. sized goggles for my pinhead, I struggle. Covering up any one of my 5 senses makes me feel claustrophobic and sends me into a state of near panic. Swimming without my contacts just renders me blind and gives me the same claustrophobic feeling. Then, I worry about drowning. I mean, I can swim enough to tread water, etc, but I feel like I need to be able to stand up if I am tired. So, during those times I have had to swim for exercise, I do the breast stroke, pretty much without putting my face in the water. I spent the first 15 years of my life at the Cape every summer, in the ocean, but I didn't really swim, like for exercise. And was always wearing a pfd when sailing, which was a big thing for me (I did Sunfish racing as a young teen). So, this is why I always laughed about 10 years ago, when people tried to get me to do a triathlon.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    IL/FL
    Posts
    3,795
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankin View Post
    I find that I can't lift my left arm up and back enough to do the front stroke. I can't float on my back, either. Just sink... Plus, I just hate putting my face in the water. Wearing contacts makes it worse. I can't get them wet, but even after finding jr. sized goggles for my pinhead, I struggle. Covering up any one of my 5 senses makes me feel claustrophobic and sends me into a state of near panic. Swimming without my contacts just renders me blind and gives me the same claustrophobic feeling. Then, I worry about drowning. I mean, I can swim enough to tread water, etc, but I feel like I need to be able to stand up if I am tired. So, during those times I have had to swim for exercise, I do the breast stroke, pretty much without putting my face in the water. I spent the first 15 years of my life at the Cape every summer, in the ocean, but I didn't really swim, like for exercise. And was always wearing a pfd when sailing, which was a big thing for me (I did Sunfish racing as a young teen). So, this is why I always laughed about 10 years ago, when people tried to get me to do a triathlon.
    I could so help you! I'd modify your stroke or teach you a better form for backstroke until you got comfortable. I taught adult TOW (terrified of water) classes for years and never failed to get someone comfortable in the water, basic desensitization techniques... although a therapist who recognizes what I'm doing would be more challenging.

    My wife also has a tiny head and awful vision, I got her some of these and they helped a bunch: http://www.speedousa.com/jr-vanquish.../style-7500602

    Electra Townie 7D

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    12,870
    Ha, I know I could conquer it if I wanted to, I just don't. I don't even have a swim membership at my gym, too much $ for something I will never use.
    Those are the goggles I bought at one time, thanks to everyone here at TE.
    We do have a very nice kevlar canoe, that we haven't used in 3-4 years. DH did some repair on it last summer, when he wasn't working, so we will try to use it a bit this year. We only do flat water ponds, though. I always feel that canoeing for an afternoon is taking away from my riding time, though, at the peak of summer weather. Will force myself this year, after my cycling vacation.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    IL/FL
    Posts
    3,795
    You sound so much like my wife, she just sees "water things" as not very interesting. Although she's coming on board with the kayaking.

    Electra Townie 7D

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    4,080
    I used to be a bad swimmer, in the sense that i could swim fine, but I was tense and anxious, used a lot of energy, didn't want my face in the water, and was mildly afraid of deep water. I even took a scuba diving class to get to grips with some of it. That helped some, but what really made a huge difference was trying snorkelling. Being able to just hang around in the water, completely relaxed, face down, getting lots of air, and seeing lots of interesting stuff was amazing! And it was so much easier to gear up and go than for scuba diving, which always felt like I was buckling up for war. I'm a much better swimmer for it, and a happy kayaker now that I have a certain feel for the water and what's below the surface.
    Winter riding is much less about badassery and much more about bundle-uppery. - malkin

    1995 Kona Cinder Cone commuterFrankenbike/Selle Italia SLR Lady Gel Flow
    2008 white Nakamura Summit Custom mtb/Terry Falcon X
    2000 Schwinn Fastback Comp road bike/Specialized Jett

  8. #38
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    485
    Really an apples and oranges thing to compare my canoeing to my bicycling. Love them both for what they are. Will admit that I do far more bicycling, though, and it's not a matter of access, either, because I can walk down to our dock and canoe anytime I want, just as I can get on the bike and ride right out my back door into the trails in our woods. The bicycling, in particular the mountain biking, is certainly more aerobically physical and that's a big part of the attraction for me. Two hours of paddling leaves me a bit sore in the arms and very stiff in the legs when I get out of the canoe, but two hours on the mountain bike or fat bike, riding the trails, or a long run on the road bike leaves me winded and tired all over, but in that good kind of tired that brings a big smile to my face and, now and then, an outright cheer for having completed a great ride.

    That was the point, though, about using kayaking as physical therapy due to its lower impact on the legs and feet and so on.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    12,870
    I actually like canoeing and my upper body always feels it!
    You'd have to kidnap me and tie me up to snorkel. That hits me exactly where I cannot tolerate. To cover my nose, and ask me to breathe through a tube by mouth would immediately put me into suffocation mode. I can't cover any sensory organ, or I am done.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,685
    Last summer when we were in Massachusetts we rented a house next to a pond near Plymouth. They had a 2-person kayak which looked more like a canoe to me. It was great going out on the pond. My brother went out with my 80-year- old father, who insisted on sitting in back and reportedly did his fair share of the paddling. Back in the day they went on many Boy Scout canoe trips together. I got a great photo of them while they were out on the water, which I printed and framed for Christmas gifts.

    I always enjoyed canoeing when I was younger. I have minimal interest in snow cycling, North Woods, but your dock and canoe look might inviting.

    I certainly am hoping to get back on my bike soon, but if things don't go well with the ankle I will have to find a place to rent a kayak and give it a go.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

 

 

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