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  1. #31
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,856

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    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    Don't know if it helps, but one of several reasons why so many of us up here in the north country use flat pedals is the cold feet thing. You can buy very expensive insulated Lake boots for going clipless, but flat pedals let you use just about any kind of boot or shoe you want. You sometimes have to adjust seat height to accommodate the different footwear you use, but no big deal. This time of year, I use my thinsulate hiking boots, but in sub-zero stuff, have even used pac boots.

    Another issue with clipless in cold winter is that they lock your feet into one position for the whole ride. That's asking for them to get cold. With flats, I move my feet around and that helps circulation. And, of course, if you do have to walk the bike home, hiking boots sure beat typical bike shoes with those neoprene bootie covers. I used the covers one winter and gave up on them. They lasted about a month of hard riding and were way short of having enough insulation for really cold weather riding. If you are going to ride, do it right and get insulated winter clipless biking shoes/boots or go flat pedal.

    As for the rest of my outfit, I use bicycle specific winter clothing for all my outer layers. Crazy expensive, but it does reduce that dreaded bulk and, for me, doubles nicely as XC ski wear. My insulated leggings are windproof in front, but breathable in back. My outer coat is also windproof and insulated, but the fit is fairly trim. A layer or two of poly, underneath, is all I need to handle zero kind of cold. Bulk is minimal.

    In serious cold as in single digits and sub-zero, overdressing and too much bulk is very dangerous on a long ride. if you start to sweat, that moisture can later freeze on you. It's a balancing act. I know I have it right if I'm a bit chilly for the first couple miles and then okay warm after that.

    When you get back, indoors, take your bike outer layers off, immediately, and hang them to dry. You'll be amazed at how much moisture they have picked up.

    One more thing and I'll shut up. That wet cold, of the type your described, NY, is the most dangerous. It's the closest I've come to getting a very dangerous case of hypothermia. Would rather take my chances in dry sub-zero air. Be careful.
    Thanks for this. I suspect that you need fewer layers to be comfortable in the cold than I do. I don't own thinsulate-lined hiking boots but if I did, they'd only keep my feet warm with temps in the 50s. I have ice cubes attached to my ankles where other people have feet.

    But, I might try to get out for a short ride this weekend if it's not windy. Temps should be in the mid-high 30s, maybe reaching 40 if I get lucky. Will try the windstopper knickers under the Amfib tights and wool leg warmers. Probably will go with a couple of layers of wool under the Showers Pass jacket. I know what you mean about overdressing and sweating in the cold, and wool is generally better to avoid that.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    california
    Posts
    1,204
    Quote Originally Posted by Muirenn View Post
    First, does it sound like I can dress warmly enough not to be miserable? I do have decent winter gear, and I can maybe figure out a regular winter coat to borrow from someone up there and wear it over my cycling coat. I do have good winter coats, but they are wool dress coats.
    Enjoy being with your Dad!!!!
    On our thanksgiving trip to Michigan it was in the low to mid 30’s for a morning ride but no snow. A good base layer, thermal tights, a merino long sleeve jersey and a good jacket were adequate for me and would have worked for even lower temps too.
    We had rain forecasted and it was a reality so I brought my Sugoi RSE jacket and my rain pants. I’m a big fangirl of Q36.5 base layers and especially their Intimo bra.
    I put my helmet in my carry on bag...filled with rolled up socks/underwear/t's.


    Another ride into the San Gabriel’s. Today we went further east of last weeks ride to Mt. Baldy and rode Lone Pine canyon road to Wrightwood, the Angels Crest Highway to Wilson Peak and then back through Wrightwood and Highway 2 to where we parked. Even though it was more elevation gain than our Mt. Baldy ride it was a little easier ride with less really steep sections. A beautiful view made the stop for our stretching, nutrition and water break a calm meditating time. Angels Crest Hwy is an incredibly visually stimulating ride, plus with very few cars (more other bicyclists than cars on our ride}. It can take you west to just north of Pasadena if you want to ride all of it from Wrightwood. When the snow comes the road is closed till early spring and this time of year is a good one to ride on it. Overcast with heavier clouds towards the top of our ride, temps were in the H50's to L60's…..79 miles.







    ‘The negative feelings we all have can be addictive…just as the positive…it’s up to
    us to decide which ones we want to choose and feed”… Pema Chodron

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,144
    Murienn, I second trying the x country skiing. It is nothing like downhill, except you are on snow! It's probably the hardest aerobic exercise you can do, but you can go slowly at first. And yes, I second Northwood's advice. Start on level ground and get the basic kick and glide down, learn to stop and to fall. Try some small hills to learn to climb and descend. Once you get the the technique down, you will find that cycling fitness helps a lot here.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,192
    Had to cancel our annual ride Saturday. We call it "lunch with Santa" due to snow, rain and fog. It's a gravel road ride with a cafe in the middle, thus lunch. The first year we did it a man who sure resembled Santa was at the cafe - thus the name of the ride was born. Part of the route is double track that turns into double mud hell when wet so perhaps we can get back out in January when everything is frozen. Just as well, I made 18 dozen cookies to take to family in Montana next week. Looks like the ice is off the roads today so can pedal over to the dollar store for cookie tins.
    Sky King
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  5. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    2,048
    Yesterday my husband and I did a "birding by bike" adventure in the Santa Cruz flats, a desert and agricultural area north of Tucson and south of Phoenix. We "chased" two Rufous-back Robins and saw them, plus a Burrowing Owl, an entire field full of Caracaras and Ravens, many Kestrels and Red-tailed Hawks and one Prairie Falcon. About 3/4 of the road was dirt so it's a good thing we took our touring bikes - the road bikes would not have been that happy on the dirt roads, even though they were well graded. 39 miles and about 40 species of birds.

    Untitled by Sharon Goldwasser, on Flickr
    2016 Specialized Ruby Comp disc - Ruby Expert ti 155
    2010 Surly Long Haul Trucker - Jett 143

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    2,048
    The farmhouse where the Rufous-backed Robins, American Robins, Abert's Towhees, House Finches, Gila Woodpeckers and other species were coming in to feast on pomegranates and drink at a leaking faucet. Also, some of the other birders intent on seeing the robins. Untitled by Sharon Goldwasser, on Flickr

    Untitled by Sharon Goldwasser, on Flickr
    2016 Specialized Ruby Comp disc - Ruby Expert ti 155
    2010 Surly Long Haul Trucker - Jett 143

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    2,048
    A distant view of a Burrowing Owl... unfortunately, no Mountain Plovers were in the field behind it.Untitled by Sharon Goldwasser, on Flickr
    2016 Specialized Ruby Comp disc - Ruby Expert ti 155
    2010 Surly Long Haul Trucker - Jett 143

  8. #38
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    680
    Hey, everyone, thanks for the breathtaking pics. I'm just stunned. Really am. Might as well be a different planet than what I have up here in snow country.

    And snow it is. Another three inches, so total snow depth is now edging over 6". That's not great news for the fat biking. Now deep enough for steering loss of control to become an issue on anything but wide and flat sections, not to mention plowing through snow up over the rims is just plain exhausting. Will be switching over to riding roads or groomed trails. Oh, well.

    That same 6" of snow is great news for the skiing, though, at least with my wide backcountry skis. Three miles of trail work and may head back out for more.

    AZ, did put up our feeders, today, so hope to report on some northern birds you might not see down there. If there's a species of interest, let me know. Did flush a Ruffed Grouse on the fat bike, yesterday. Our bird feeder season is basically Dec 1 to maybe the third week of March. Otherwise, you end up feeding the black bears and then you have a serious problem on your hands. Been there, done that. This guy was especially grouchy. Didn't want to leave the yard, at all.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    california
    Posts
    1,204
    nwg that's not my kind of neighbor.....had a ranger in the santa monica mountains tell me that by the time i see a cougar once they could have seen me multiple times.

    thinking with all these snow posts i shouldn't add temps to my ride posts for a couple of months
    ‘The negative feelings we all have can be addictive…just as the positive…it’s up to
    us to decide which ones we want to choose and feed”… Pema Chodron

  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    680
    Gosh, no, don't stop posting those warm temps. They warm me up in spirit, at least.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    On my bike
    Posts
    2,510
    Please keep posting the cold temps too. I'm a weather weanie - don't like to ride below 50 degrees - but love morning rides. Luckily, in Tucson we don't have months of cold weather.
    To train a dog, you must be more interesting than dirt.

    Trek Project One
    Trek FX 7.4 Hybrid

  12. #42
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    680
    Another 2" of snow, overnight, for a total, now, of over 8" on the ground. That means the fat bikes are going to need some help, either by using them on groomed trails or on paved, snow packed roads and, this time of year, all our roads are snow-packed. As for my trials around the house, they are now XC ski only, but I knew that was coming and I built the trails with both bikes and skis in mind. Truly lovely trails on the skis, with enough ups and down to make them interesting. By the time i have skied every loop and branch, I have two miles under my skis. Once the lake is just a bit more iced, will get even more miles with some lake and bike work on the ice. Headed below zero for the next few nights, so won't be long, now, and I can stretch my legs out on the ice.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 12-12-2016 at 09:44 AM.

  13. #43
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,856
    People with warm weather, please do continue to share the details. It helps me get through the winter to remember warmer days.

    I rode on Saturday, 37 miles. Personally I would have been content with a shorter ride but was with two friends, one of whom rarely rides less than 35 even on the coldest days. And she likes to start no later than 10 am even on the coldest mornings. But making plans to ride with others is the best way to get my butt out the door in the winter, and it helps to have company along the way.

    I think the temperate range was 36-41, with a NW breeze. But the sun was out with very few clouds in the sky, and it helped. I went with three layers of wool under my Shower's Pass jacket -- a midweight Smartwool base layer, a short sleeved wool jersey with wool arm warmers, and an old lambswool sweater that I wouldn't wear otherwise because it's a bit snug and has a small hole in it. For the last part of the ride I probably would have been okay without the middle layer, but I wasn't really uncomfortable, especially since we were near the Chesapeake Bay where it tends to be cooler in winter. For my legs, I wore Gore Windstopper knickers with a chamois instead of shorts under my Amfib tights, plus the wool knee warmers below my knees. And I stuck some chemical toe warmers on the outside of my shoes (inside the booties) to cover my toes. For the most part I was comfortable. So I do seem to need more layers than most people in order to stay warm. Oh well, the good thing was that I'm now able to lower my minimum temperature for outdoor riding by a few degrees. Though in the future I will try to keep the distance closer to 30 miles, max.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  14. #44
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    680
    Glad you found the combo that worked or you, NY. You're right about folks being different in how they react to the cold. No wind and sunshine sure makes a big difference for me, too. The sunshine factor is probably mostly psychological for me, but it sure helps. Today was a good example. Temp only in the teens, but calm and sunny. Had a great day on the skis, followed up by a little fat bike work on neighboring roads. Have found that it's actually much safer for me riding the fat bikes on icy, snow-packed roads than walking.

    Put my bird feeders up on Sunday afternoon and they're being mobbed by Chickadees as I write this. Way cool.

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Traveling Nomad
    Posts
    6,664
    AZFiddle, loved your pics and hearing about your birding. I have never seen a Burrowing Owl. So cool!

    We rode the past two days, and tomorrow will be our day off for recovery, laundry, grocery shopping, projects, cooking, ETC!

    Yesterday's ride was east on the West Orange Trail (the easy way!) with a couple of trail spurs, for a total of 33 miles. Today's was west to hilly Lake County (the hard way!) for a total of 36.5 miles. I've beat my yearly goal of 3K miles and am loving going sleeveless in December! Yesterday was a little cooler and overcast, so I wore a thin long-sleeved top (with shorts), but today was full-on sleeveless.

    I will say, though, for those of you who want to hear about warm temps, I am sweating big time right now! Took a shower after our ride and am going to need a second one. I don't mind the heat but could definitely do without the humidity (drip!)
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

 

 

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