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  1. #16
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    california
    Posts
    1,201

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    As always, thanks Emily…and NY, not editing was a very nice way of showing your positivity and helping other ride leaders feel it too.

    Very peaceful image nwg!!!!

    My very cold/wet/muddy ride in Michigan on Thanksgiving re-enforced the enjoyment/adventure that any kind of weather can give a ride….then again a fireplace, a hot chocolate and a view of falling snow hmmmmmm
    Last edited by rebeccaC; 12-06-2016 at 07:28 AM.
    ‘The negative feelings we all have can be addictive…just as the positive…it’s up to
    us to decide which ones we want to choose and feed”… Pema Chodron

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    2,045
    I braved the cold (Tucson cold) weather Friday to commute: 37 degrees is what the NWS said for my start time. My hands were cold, but everything else wasn't too bad. It was much better after the sun came up (7 miles in). Coming home was cloudy, and kind of blustery so I had all the cold weather gear on even though it was in the low 50's. Saturday I mainly did errands on the Surly- grocery shopping etc. Sunday I rode back in to work to ready for my annual formal evaluation- got the lesson plans done and ready to go. No ride today.
    2016 Specialized Ruby Comp disc - Ruby Expert ti 155
    2010 Surly Long Haul Trucker - Jett 143

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Traveling Nomad
    Posts
    6,636
    Yesterday we did our usual ride towards Apopka but tried a different way to get over to the West Orange Trail, involving more road riding on some low-traffic roads. Cut down on the number of road crossings and other (often even slower than me) cyclists we had to deal with. Also took a couple of trail spurs, so I got in my usual mileage (33) without having to ride into downtown Apopka, which is stop sign after stop sign and way too many road crossings. There's a nice rest room at Apopka Station, but not having to go all that way makes for a more pleasant ride. Super windy again though.

    Today was a planned day off, and a good thing indeed, as we got a lot of much-needed rain. Got out for a nice walk afterwards.
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

  4. #19
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    Another inch and a half of snow on top of the several we already had, but fairly dry stuff, so stable and not too tricky. Used the big Salsa Blackboro with its 4.8" tires to break trail then finished up with the Pugsley and it's 4" tires for a little variety. Dropping temps all day, but no big snow in the weekly forecast, ahead, so this girl is still riding, cold and all, with a big smile on her face. The woods in winter are so cool. My idea of heaven.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Concord, MA
    Posts
    13,101
    Yesterday we had about 2 inches of snow, which turned to a nice wintry mix on the road by the time I got home. It was 42 today and beautiful, but of course, tomorrow, there's another icy mix forecasted for the AM. So, another crappy day and no group ride. I signed up for spin. The temperatures are supposed to plummet after that. If the roads are somewhat cleaner by Saturday, I might brave a short road ride, but it looks like my outdoor rides may be numbered.
    2015 Trek Silque SSL
    Specialized Oura

    2011 Guru Praemio
    Specialized Oura

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Traveling Nomad
    Posts
    6,636
    Today we put the panniers on the Bike Fridays and rode west to the Clermont Walmart to pick up my DH's new glasses plus some groceries and household items we needed. The ride took us through some of the hilliest parts of Lake County, and I could really feel the heavier load on the back end of my bike. Glad for the low gears! I just never dreamed I'd be riding hills in Florida. There are actually some beautiful views of Lake Apopka from the high points, though I didn't take any photos this time.

    Fortunately, we can ride to Apopka tomorrow, which is a much less hilly, recovery ride. Today was tough but a good accomplishment. 28.5 miles total at a slow (12 mph) pace, about 2/3 on bike paths, and 1/3 on road, mostly with bike lanes.
    Emily

    2011 Jamis Dakar XC "Toto" - Selle Italia Ldy Gel Flow
    2007 Trek Pilot 5.0 WSD "Gloria" - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow
    2004 Bike Friday Petite Pocket Crusoe - Selle Italia Diva Gel Flow

  7. #22
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    I think we talked about those hills, Emily, back when I was that area in September. Definitely some worthy stuff if you enjoy hills. Also shopped at Wal-Mart, too. Small world.

    Maybe just enough snow to mix in some XC skiing with the biking, now, so we'll see. Headed below zero for next week, so, yeah, winter is really here. When the lake freezes over, will be doing some skiing and biking on it. Fat bikes are a pretty cool way to play out on the ice, in case you haven't tried it.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 12-08-2016 at 07:58 AM.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    northern Virginia
    Posts
    5,828
    I rode last night, likely my last post-work hill ride for this year. It was just above 40 degrees when I started, high 30s when I finished an hour and a half later, and somewhat damp. I thought I'd be able to dress right for the conditions but I was wrong. I was never really comfortable, and the whole time I felt so constricted by all the clothes. I'm curious if others who ride in cold temps or do other outdoor activities in winter have suggestions for staying warm without feeling like kid brother Randy from A Christmas Story when his mother dresses him for the walk to school ("I can't put my arms down!!").

    I have a warm Gore jacket, a softshell Windstopper fabric with fleece inside. I wore that last night over a light wool baselayer and a regular long-sleeved jersey. The jacket is a bit snug in the sleeves which was part of the constricted feeling. On top of the jacket I wore a wind vest, which was actually cutting into the front of my shoulders a bit, not enough to be really uncomfortable but adding to the constriction. This combination of layers was okay for much of the ride, though a bit cool when going downhill. On my head I wore my SmartWool balaclava, which is not something I really like wearing but kept my head and cheeks warm enough. The bigger problem was my legs and feet. I had on my Amfib tights over regular bike shorts, knee-high wool socks, DeFeet wool leg warmers on top of the tights from the knees to the ankles, Gore Windstopper booties with fleece lining, and chemical toe warmers between my feet and the metal cleats in the shoes. The problem was that my thighs and butt were cold. Also after a while my toes felt very cold, which might have been because of the cold legs or might have just meant that I need a second pair of chemical warmers in side my shoes (or maybe between the shoes and the booties). Then for the last couple of miles the jacket/vest combination was no longer enough, so I took off the vest and put on my unlined Gore wind/waterproof jacket on top of the lined softshell jacket. This was warm enough but the lightweight jacket was not big enough to fit comfortably over the warmer jacket, especially in the sleeves.

    In spite of being not generally comfortable, I would have been okay to do my usual route except for the cold toes. So I took some shortcuts and ended up with 15.5 miles in all.

    Part of me knows I need to get the indoor trainer out of storage so I can start using it, because it's kind of ridiculous to have to bundle up so much that you can barely bend your elbows. But part of me wants to try to get in a ride this weekend when it's in the 30s during the day. I mean, it's only December, and I just don't want to be stuck inside yet.

    If I try to ride outside this weekend, I think I will wear knickers instead of regular shorts under the Amfibs tights. I have a pair of knickers that are Gore Windstopper fabric. Combined with the wool Kneekers and the Amfibs, they might be enough for my legs. And I might try adding toe warmers between the shoes and booties, either the chemical kind or my toe covers. Above the waist, I have a wind/waterproof Showers Pass jacket that is always too warm for riding in spring and fall rains, but with a couple of layers of wool underneath it's been pretty good for some colder rides that I've done in past years. And it's loose-fitting enough to be comfortable with the extra layers underneath.

    So we'll see. Maybe I'll get all bundled up and head outside, or maybe not.
    Last edited by ny biker; 12-08-2016 at 10:03 AM.

    - Gray Trek Madone 4.7 road bike, mystery crack in top tube repaired by Calfee, Bontrager Affinity RXL saddle
    - Red Trek 6000 mountain bike, Bontrager Evoke WSD saddle

    Gone but not forgotten:
    - Silver Trek 2000 road bike
    - Two awesome and worn out Juliana saddles

  9. #24
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    Don't know if it helps, but one of several reasons why so many of us up here in the north country use flat pedals is the cold feet thing. You can buy very expensive insulated Lake boots for going clipless, but flat pedals let you use just about any kind of boot or shoe you want. You sometimes have to adjust seat height to accommodate the different footwear you use, but no big deal. This time of year, I use my thinsulate hiking boots, but in sub-zero stuff, have even used pac boots.

    Another issue with clipless in cold winter is that they lock your feet into one position for the whole ride. That's asking for them to get cold. With flats, I move my feet around and that helps circulation. And, of course, if you do have to walk the bike home, hiking boots sure beat typical bike shoes with those neoprene bootie covers. I used the covers one winter and gave up on them. They lasted about a month of hard riding and were way short of having enough insulation for really cold weather riding. If you are going to ride, do it right and get insulated winter clipless biking shoes/boots or go flat pedal.

    As for the rest of my outfit, I use bicycle specific winter clothing for all my outer layers. Crazy expensive, but it does reduce that dreaded bulk and, for me, doubles nicely as XC ski wear. My insulated leggings are windproof in front, but breathable in back. My outer coat is also windproof and insulated, but the fit is fairly trim. A layer or two of poly, underneath, is all I need to handle zero kind of cold. Bulk is minimal.

    In serious cold as in single digits and sub-zero, overdressing and too much bulk is very dangerous on a long ride. if you start to sweat, that moisture can later freeze on you. It's a balancing act. I know I have it right if I'm a bit chilly for the first couple miles and then okay warm after that.

    When you get back, indoors, take your bike outer layers off, immediately, and hang them to dry. You'll be amazed at how much moisture they have picked up.

    One more thing and I'll shut up. That wet cold, of the type your described, NY, is the most dangerous. It's the closest I've come to getting a very dangerous case of hypothermia. Would rather take my chances in dry sub-zero air. Be careful.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 12-08-2016 at 11:44 AM.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    I'm flying to see my dad for Xmas; he lives in NE Iowa, and I can rent a Salsa Beargrease in my size for 3 days for only $80.00. Problem is, I live near Savannah GA, where we get no snow, and it's been unusually warm this year, so I'm not remotely acclimated.

    First, does it sound like I can dress warmly enough not to be miserable? I do have decent winter gear, and I can maybe figure out a regular winter coat to borrow from someone up there and wear it over my cycling coat. I do have good winter coats, but they are wool dress coats.

    Next, has anyone ever traveled by airline with their helmet? Obviously I won't check it, but carrying it all day sounds like a pain. Experiences? I know people say to bring your saddle, but that sounds like a lot of trouble. Maybe I should, but I have a Brooks on my Krampus, and I'm not going to lug that around. I use Specialized Romins on my other bikes. So...?

    What kind of shoes should I wear? I have some Blondo boots made in Canada that will be good for winter. Not sure about using them on a mountain bike. Won't they get ruined? Or maybe not have appropriate tread? Not sure what to do, there.

    Other suggestions? Comments? I'll be there 7 days, and only have the bike for 3, so it won't interfere with the visit. My dad lives next to a rail-trail, though it's paved, right off the woods on the river. He can't really get out much, so I can do this to get away from the house for a few hours, and I've never ridden a fat bike.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  11. #26
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    Me, I'm a keep things simple and adapt as your go kind of gal. I'd say just wear your hiking boots. Most rental bikes are equipped with flat pedals, anyway, so you're good to go. If they're flat pedals with pins, even better. Should be plenty of grip with typical lugged sole hiking boots. If pins, softer sole walking shoes even work.

    As for the winter coat, light is better than big and bulky and heavily insulated. You'll do an instant sweat in a big heavy wool dress coat. Teens and twenties for temps are very doable with a windproof outer if you already have one and layers of polar fleece, underneath. Peel as needed. As above, important not to sweat too much.

    With fatties and MTBs, I wouldn't mess with dragging your own seat, along. If you'll be riding real dirt, sand, snow MTB trails, you spend a lot of time standing in the pedals or with light pressure on the seat. I'm much fussier about the seat on my road bikes. To be honest, though, if you plan to ride a paved trail, as mentioned, the Beargrease is way overkill unless you have snow over the pavement. To really appreciate fatties, you need to get into the dirt. Check with the rental place when you get there. If the trails are snow free, you could just rent a road bike or hybrid.

    Same for me on the helmet. Those usually come with the bike when you rent the bike. Can't see dragging along a helmet unless you have a hard time getting a fit.

    Have fun.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Thanks! They are nothiking boots, full leather short and waterproof. I think they'll do. I know what you mean about a fat be being overkill, but he lives next to the woods, and it would be fun to have the chance to ride in the snow. I'll call them and see.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  13. #28
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    Best of luck.

    Another couple inches of snow, today, and now just enough for some skiing on my home built trails. Did a combo with 4 miles on the fat bike and a bit over 2 with the skis. Lot more huffing and puffing on the fat bike, but definitely a lot faster and trickier. Love the skiing, though. Very civilized by comparison.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    6,449
    Quote Originally Posted by north woods gal View Post
    Best of luck.

    Another couple inches of snow, today, and now just enough for some skiing on my home built trails. Did a combo with 4 miles on the fat bike and a bit over 2 with the skis. Lot more huffing and puffing on the fat bike, but definitely a lot faster and trickier. Love the skiing, though. Very civilized by comparison.
    I asked my brother if there were snow on the ground, and whether he thought there might be at Xmas, and what I planned to do. His response? "You realize it's going to be cold, right?!"

    Ha ha!!! Anyway. I've always wanted to try riding a fatbike in the snow. Looking forward to trying. Interestingly, my dad mentioned cross country skiing, which I've never done in my life. Wouldn't that be quite difficult? I did downhill skiining when I was a kid, but it's been a very long time.
    So long as the wheels are still turning, life is good.

    Battswebb

    Pinarello Quattro~CAADX~ Zurich Lemond
    Specialized Romin Saddles

    Surly Krampus!

  15. #30
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    north woods of Wisconsin
    Posts
    632
    I strongly urge you to give XC skiing a try. Very intuitive and basic. Not hard at all. Nowhere near as technical as MTB trial riding. If you can walk, you can XC ski. Just be sure to start out on a nice level stretch. Once you get your legs under you, gradually work your way into gentle climbs and descents. Have taught my husband and several friends and had them out on the trail with me, first time. Best way to start is to rent from a shop that knows how to fit you with the right gear. Don't need wilderness to enjoy XC either. When I lived in the Chicago suburbs, would ski right out of may garden level apartment, across lawns, over to several city parks. Basically had them to myself. Fun, fun, fun.
    Last edited by north woods gal; 12-09-2016 at 08:01 AM.

 

 

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